Tuesday, June 21, 2016

BRAMBLETTE FAMILY IN AMERICA:
Descendants of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet and/or William Bramlett I/Sr.
Original "Caravel Discovery Ships" digital image by Deborah G. Dennis, 2014 Cooper River, Charleston, S. C.

COPYRIGHT 2016 DEBORAH G. DENNIS
Charleston, South Carolina
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED,
INCLUDING THE RIGHT OF REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR PART IN ANY FORM



"Charleston, You Are Beautiful!" courtesy Chad Matthew "Chad Wick" Dennis
One View of Charleston at Christmastime

Please scroll down for text and/or use your search engine to locate individuals in the following emerging consecutive chapters.


PREFACE
BRAMBLETTE FAMILY
The Bramblette family in America appears to have originated with William Bramlett I/Sr., born in/before 1694, most likely in Colonial Virginia, and perhaps his father, Ambrose "Bamblet" or Bramblet, probably born in western Europe, who reportedly immigrated to America from Great Britain in 1690. Unfortunately, the names of Ambrose's wife and William I/Sr.'s first wife are unknown. William I/Sr. second married Elizabeth Callaway, who is the mother of some of his younger children. With few Bibles, wills and probate records to fully document the early Bramblette generations, we find only thin trails and hints of trials of historical existence and life struggles, tragedies and triumphs in a few Virginia deeds, plat maps, tax records and other court documents. We piece together what we can and conclude, while the nuggets of information are interesting and valuable to us alone, the ancestors' true legacies live on in the DNA of thousands of descendants with the name Bramblette, Bramblett, Bramblet, Bramlet, Bramlett, Bramlette and other variations and different allied surnames. Hopefully, DNA comparisons, while helpful in genealogy, will someday be replaced by a better mechanism of comparing our paper trails with matches and measuring the connections of relatives. Our familial multitude of thousands in the past and today populate the records of many areas of the country from the original Thirteen Colonies to California and states between. Many of us honor the early ancestors with respect and gratitude after realizing how fortunate we are to have been born into such a courageous, adventurous, prosperous family, let alone to have been born at all and survived in a dangerous world to adulthood. The world seems even more dangerous today with the struggle between opposite extremist ideologies and the innocents trapped in conflicts. Choose courage and encourage others. Love Wins.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1: Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet I/Senior

Chapter 2: William Bramlett I/Senior (not yet fully uploaded)

Chapter 3: Henry Bramlett I/Senior (not yet fully uploaded)

Chapter 4: Rev. William Bramblett Junior (not yet uploaded)

Chapter 5: Sarah Bramblett (not yet uploaded)

Chapter 6: James Bramblett (not yet uploaded)

Chapter 7: Nancy Bramblett (not yet uploaded)

Chapter 8: Ambrose Bramblett (not yet uploaded)

Chapter 9: Agatha “Aggie” Bramblett (not yet uploaded)

Chapter 10: Elizabeth “Betty” Bramlett (not yet uploaded)

Afterword
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Chapter 1: 
Generation 1
AMBROSE BAMBLET/BRAMBLET I/SENIOR
(Possible Immigrant 1690; Possible Patriarch of Bramblettes in America)
(Children: William I/Sr.? Others?)
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Possible Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis
AMBROSE BAMBLET (BRAMBLET) I/SR., parents unknown, was born before 1690 when he apparently immigrated to America. Assuming he was an adult at the time, he was born circa 1669-1672 or earlier. One immigration document recorded in Virginia Land Patents suggests Ambrose was transported from England in 1689 or 1690, apparently alone without wife or other close relatives, to help populate New Kent Co., Va. It is not known if he actually boarded the ship, survived the journey and arrived in America. His name, “Ambrose Bamblet,” which appears on a Virginia Land Office Patent, is the only evidence yet found of his existence. In the land patent record, the scribe may have just misspelled the name by omitting the R from Bramblet, a common variant spelling. Ambrose reportedly was one of forty-five persons transported to America by John Lyddal, who received 648 acres of land in St. John's Parish, New Kent Co., Va., for bringing in the new settlers. St. John's Parish was created in 1680. The original handwritten patent, difficult to decipher, contains a description of the land and indicates it may have been part of more than 2,200 acres previously granted to Capt. Geo. Lydal and others. 
To all &tc. whereas & Now Know ye that ... lying and being in New Kent County in St. John's Parish ... 1690 beginning on south side of Black Creek at mouth of the south branch about 35 two pole chains below the new mill adjacent to ... &tc now or late, of Mr. Napier &tc ... acres granted to Capt. Geo. Lydal ... & deserted & granted to Mr. John Langston ... March 1672/3 but never present & deserted & granted to sd. John Lyddal by order &tc court 648 acres bering date of 17th of October 1689 by and for the importation of forty-five persons into the Collony, whose names...to have and to hold...the 21st of April anno dom 1690....Ambrose Bamblet...." (Virginia Land Patent Book 8, p. 45)
Digital Record of John Lyddal's 1690 Virginia Land Office Patent, courtesy Library of Virginia 
Ambrose Bamblet is located at the bottom, left, last line.
The patent identifies 44 other immigrants with different surnames; no wife or children were transported with Ambrose. Without later records with the same names, we have no way of connecting the other persons to Ambrose. The other immigrants and Ambrose were most likely indentured servants who planned to work as farmers for a specific amount of years without pay in exchange for transportation to the new land. Ambrose apparently came to America to become a farmer in Virginia. No record of the exact plot of land he planned to farm or actually farmed in St. John's Parish has been found. No marriage record or other public or official or private record of him has been yet located in existing documents: New Kent is a burned county with few surviving early records. No other details of his life are known. The cause of his death, his death date and place and burial place are unknown. The name of his wife, if he married, is unknown. The names of his children, if he had any, are undocumented. However, he may be father of William Bramlett I/Sr., most likely born as an English citizen before 1694 in Colonial Virginia, then ruled by Great Britain. Ambrose and William I/Sr. do have geographical proximity in common: New Kent County, created 1634, where Ambrose reportedly lived, is very close--only two narrow counties away--from Essex County, created 1692, where William I/Sr., lived in 1715-1716. No definitive record of immigration has been found for William. (One of William’s sons is named Ambrose Bramlett, perhaps a namesake of this paternal grandfather.) If Ambrose Bamblet had other children, in addition to William I/Sr., they are not yet known.
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Chapter 2:
Generation 2
WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR. and UNKNOWN FIRST WIFE and ELIZABETH CALLAWAY
(Patriarch of Essex, Caroline, Lunenburg, Bedford and Most Likely King George, Prince William, Fauquier Bramblettes)
(Children: Henry Sr., William Jr., Sarah, James, Nancy, Ambrose, Agatha, Elizabeth)
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Most Likely Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis
WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR., perhaps child of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet I/Sr., was born in 1694-1695, most likely in Colonial Virginia. He witnessed a deed in 1715-1716, which indicates he was at least age 21 and born in/by 1694-1695, and much later successfully petitioned the Bedford County Court for an exemption from levies at about age 60 on Nov. 25, 1755, which suggests he indeed was born in 1694-1695. With a tax exemption, he was no longer required to pay taxes or work on roads or participate as an active member of the county and state militias. Although William I/Sr. has long been identified as our “immigrant ancestor,” no clear evidence of immigration has been found for him: He most likely was born here, in Virginia, to Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet who reportedly arrived here in 1690 to help populate land in New Kent Co., Va. The name of William I/Sr.'s mother and first wife are unknown. William I/Sr. died between 1759 and 1762 in Bedford Co., Va. He probably died shortly before Nov. 26, 1759, the recording date for a deed he wrote six months earlier on May 3 that year. His burial place is unknown. He may be buried in the lost family graveyard on Bramblett land that later became Cedar Hill in Bedford, Va., the plantation established by his son Rev. William Bramblett Jr. in 1760. Or he may be buried in one of the church cemeteries nearby or in Callaway Cemetery.
   William Bramlett I/Sr. and his daughters and sons are all early settlers of Bedford since they already were living there in 1754 when the county was founded and created from Lunenburg. At some point, between 1747 and 1768, Bramblett Road was surveyed and cleared by William I/Sr. and/or some of his sons, perhaps including Rev. William Jr., to facilitate travel along or through an area now known as the former Cedar Hill Plantation in present day Bedford, Va. William Bramlett I/Sr., a surveyor living in Caroline County at least until late 1747 and living by 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg that became Bedford County in 1754, no doubt was involved in building his own road on his land or wherever he lived there. He did not retire until 1755, and Bramblett Road ran right past or through his son Rev. William Jr.'s Cedar Hill property: today it is known as West Main Street. The road existed on April 26, 1868, when son Rev. William Jr. was appointed surveyor for a road "from Bramblett's [Road or house] to Augusta Road" (CB-3:424). Celebrated historian Lula Eastman Jeter Parker describes the thoroughfare but offers no date for its creation in Parker's History of Bedford County, Virginia:
'Bramblett's Road' is the first road of importance mentioned in Bedford County records. This was an east-to-west thoroughfare passing through New London, and what was later the town of Liberty, and on to the Botetourt County line. It was probably the same route as that followed by the Lynchburg and Salem Turnpike, built i the early 1830s, and practically the same, from Bedford to Roanoke, as State Highway 460 of today. (85)
Lula is a direct descendant of William Bramlett I/Sr. through his daughter Elizabeth Bramlett, an early settler of Bedford in 1754, who married Col. James Buford. Able-bodied landowners and non-exempt residents were asked/required to clear and construct roads for their and public use by county courts in colonial and early America. County orders to "view a road" (meaning to suggest a location and/or survey the site) are common in early records.
William's Marriages
   William I/Sr. married at least twice and had at least eight children. He probably married his first wife, unknown, circa 1710. She most likely is mother of Henry I/Sr., Rev. William Jr., Sarah, James and Nancy. William I/Sr. married his second wife, Elizabeth Callaway, circa 1732 in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. She most likely is mother of Ambrose, Agatha “Aggie” and Elizabeth “Bettie” Bramlett. Elizabeth Callaway, daughter of unknown mother and Joseph Callaway, was born circa 1710 in Virginia, according to the late Bobbie Callaway, former Callaway Association Historian. (Elizabeth cannot be mother of William I/Sr.’s probable eldest son Henry I/Sr. since Henry I/Sr. and his stepmother Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett share the same birth year--1710.) Elizabeth died before 1759, probably in Caroline, Lunenburg or Bedford County, since she is not mentioned in the deed of gift dated that year which William I/Sr. wrote to transfer property to his son-in-law Stephen White, husband of Agatha “Aggie” Bramblett. He would have made living arrangements for Elizabeth as well if she were still alive. William I/Sr. wrote a will in 1758 that names heirs and legacies; however, unfortunately, its location is unknown and it apparently was not recorded.
William's Life in Colonial Virginia
   William I/Sr. is the oldest definite Bramblette found so far in existing records, not counting Ambrose I/Sr. William I/Sr. first appears as an adult, at least age 21, as a witness on a Feb. 16-17, 1715-1716, deed recorded in Essex County (DB-11:62). "William Bramlit" signed the deed, which records the lease or sale of 53 acres of land in St. Mary's Parish, Essex Co, Va., by Matthew Collins to John Morgan, both of Essex County. George Robinson and John Smith also witnessed the document, which was recorded March 20, 1715-1716. The land, adjacent to a corner of John Ellitt's land and the south fork of Peumansend Creek swamp called the Beaverdam branch, was formerly granted/patented April 17, 1667, to Henry Peters who was deceased. The land was located in an area of St. Mary's Parish that later became Caroline County. Essex County, created 1692, is near New Kent where Ambrose I/Sr. reportedly settled in 1690. Since William I/Sr. was required to be at least age 21 to legally witness the 1715-1716 record, the signature allows us to calculate his birth year as in/before 1694-1695. Essex also is adjacent to King George County, created 1721, where planter Henry Bramlett I/Sr., believed to be son of William I/Sr., was living in 1735. The early found and documented Bramblettes in 1690-1715-1735--Ambrose I/Sr., William I/Sr., Henry I/Sr.--lived in relatively close geographical proximity to each other, within the same small region in three counties of eastern Colonial Virginia. William I/Sr. is mentioned in several Essex and Caroline County records, a few times as a witness to land transactions and a few times as the plaintiff and defendant in court cases. He and John Sanders witnessed a deed on Feb. 18-19, 1716, when Thomas Griffin leased or sold 100 acres of land in Essex County to George Robinson (DB-11:64). He also witnessed a deed on July 13-14, 1722, when Allin Frazier of Essex County sold land to William Blanton of the same county (DB-11:84). Thomas Smith, George Robinson and Joan Frazier also witnessed (made their marks on) the document. William I/Sr. also served on several Caroline County juries between 1733-1736. He most likely lived in a portion of Essex that became Caroline in 1728, based on a legislative act of 1727. It is not known if he owned land in Essex and/or Caroline County. Exactly which land he owned in Lunenburg/Bedford County is not known, but the items in his personal possession in 1759, including livestock and household goods, suggest he owned a home and land and his occupation was planter and farmer. He may have first owned the land his son Rev. William Jr. acquired or inherited from the mysterious will, with a majestic view of the Peaks of Otter, perhaps part of more than 700 acres of land used to establish Cedar Hill Plantation circa 1760-1761.
   An important court record involves William I/Sr. and the Callaway family: Ann Callaway, sister of Thomas Callaway, petitioned the Caroline County Court to choose "Wm. Bramblitt" her guardian on Oct. 12, 1732. (Ann would have been at least age 12 and under age 18, thus born between 1715-1720, in order to legally choose a guardian in Virginia in 1732.) Thomas Callaway was summoned to answer the petition (OB-1732-1740:43). Both Thomas and Ann are children of Joseph Callaway II of Essex County, who reportedly died of a fever in 1732, according to family tradition. His other children include Elizabeth Callaway, born in 1710, second wife of William I/Sr., and Richard Callaway, a resident of Essex/Caroline County who moved to Lunenburg County by 1752. "Rich. Callaway" is included in the Tithe List that year living near William Bramlett I/Sr. and with the latter's son "Amb. Bramlet" as a tithable, a white male over 16, in his Callaway house. Richard paid three tithes. Thomas Mosely created the list for John Phelps. (Richard Callaway and brother William Callaway were among the first justices appointed in Bedford County in 1754. Their brother also is Col. James Callaway who married Sarah Bramblett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr. Richard Callaway later moved to Fort Boonesboough, Ky., and was killed at his ferry by Indians.) "Wm. Bramlet Jr." is listed as a tithable with his father, William I/Sr., on John Phelps' list of residents whose names were collected by Matthew Talbot for Lunenburg County in 1752. William and Richard also may be on other tithe lists for earlier and later years. (This Ambrose later married Janny Woodson and moved to North Carolina and Georgia; he is not the elder Ambrose Bamblet, possible immigrant, would have been at least 80-85 in 1755 if still alive, and exempt, thus not of tithable age.) Ann Callaway is believed to be the youngest sister of Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett, the reason Ann selected William Bramlett I/Sr. as her guardian. There is no other documentation for the implied marriage of Elizabeth and William I/Sr., but he and sons are named with Callaways in several other Virginia records as well.
   William I/Sr. and Elizabeth, if still living, resided in Caroline County until at least 1747 before moving south to Lunenburg County. On Nov. 13, 1747, "The Court proceed to lay the County levy" and paid William Bramlett 300 pounds of tobacco, perhaps for surveying. The court had appointed William Bramlett surveyor "in the room of" (to replace) John Ralls on April 10, 1741.
   William I/Sr. moved his family by 1752 to a portion of Lunenburg Co., Va., that became Bedford County in 1754. He was considered an early settler of Bedford County since he was living in the area when land boundaries changed to create Bedford. He was still living in Bedford a few years later when the county court on Nov. 25, 1755, gave him the above mentioned tax exemption due to his age: 60 years or older.
   "Wm. Bromlet Senr."--either William I/Sr. in 1762 or his son Rev. William Bramblett Jr. in 1766 -- is referenced as a creditor who was due 5 shillings in the Bedford Co., Va., estate of William Boyd, dated between 1762 and Sept. 23, 1766 (WB-1:21-24). By the latter date, Rev. William Bramblett Jr. may have been the senior William "Bromlet" in Bedford. The scribe/clerk would not have referenced William Bromlet Senr.'s estate because there was no estate: William Bramlett I/Sr. had deeded his property to son-in-law Stephen White in 1759 and bequeathed other legacies to heirs named in his mysterious, lost 1758 will, which was not recorded. The deed of gift to his son-in-law was not a probate record and does not name the heirs of those legacies or the items bequeathed in the 1758 will.
   "William Bramblet Sr." signed the bill of sale for livestock and other property to son-in-law Stephen White on May 3, 1759, and it was recorded as a deed of gift in Bedford County in 1759:
Bramlet to White Bill of Sale: Know All Men by these Presents that I William Bramlet Senr. of the County of Bedford & Parish of Russel, do Bargain, Contract & Deliver unto Stephen White for a Valuable Consideration, that is to say for my maintainanse in a Decent and Wholesom manner with Clothing agreeable to my age, diet, washing & Lodging in a good & Wholesom & becoming Manner During Life, all & singular my Stock of Cattle & Hoggs & Horses, Household goods & all other appertenance to me Belonging of what Nature or Kind soever after the Legacies mentioned in my Will bearing date 6th of February 1758 are paid as I give this Bill of Sail only to Stringthen the Right & ... Impower the said Stephen White in his Part and do warrant the same from myself and from any Person or Persons Whatsoever given under my Hand this third day of May 1759 William Bramlett (DB-A-1:238)
John Robinson and William and Anester Young or Going witnessed the document, which was recorded Nov. 26, 1759, in Bedford Co., Va. Mortimeyer and Revesz read the Young surname as "Gowing" and note the Gowing family name has evolved to Gowan, that some of William and Anester's descendants may have moved to Bedford Co., Tenn. (201). 
   William I/Sr.'s children are listed in an unpublished manuscript titled "Bramblett" written by Bedford County historian and Bramblette-Buford descendant Lula Eastman Jeter Parker in Bedford County on Sept. 28, 1933. Parker and the late Mrs. Sarah A.. Bell Buford (second wife of Rowland Dabney "R. D." Buford), who was then in 1933 deceased, "both searched the records of Bedford County, Va., for data of the Bramblett family, and often talked over our findings." Parker deposited her brief history with the Bedford County clerk. She writes, 
We concluded that William Bramblett, Sr., settled in Brunswick County in the early 1700’s, perhaps in territory that was cut off into Lunenburg in 1748, and into Bedford in 1754; and that, since we found no other Bramblett who could have been his contemporary, he must have been the progenitor of the family in Virginia, and that he was the father of all of the older Brambletts in this section. He died after November 26, 1759, when he made a Bill of Sale to Stephen White, and perhaps before 1761, when his daughter, Elizabeth, (my ancestress) married James Buford, for she signed her own marriage bond.
William I/Sr.'s 1759 deed was written in May and recorded Nov. 26, so he may have died before or on the latter date. These family sleuths focused mainly on their beloved Bedford records for Bramblettes and did not check other Virginia counties, which would have introduced them to a whole new world of family activities in Essex, Caroline, King George, Prince William and Fauquier. They would have discovered in Caroline County Court records William Bramlett I/Sr.'s residence was not Lunenburg County when it still was Brunswick County--before May 1, 1746; recorded documents at that time prove he was living in Essex and then Caroline County until at least November 1747. However, he did live in 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg, formerly Brunswick, that became Bedford in 1754. Historians in the 1930s did not have the easy access to the large amount of information that we enjoy today, but Parker and Mrs. (Mary A. Bell) Buford did have easy access to Bedford records because Mrs. Buford was the wife of the county clerk. Rowland Dabney "R. D." Buford, 1827-1921, served 32 years in that capacity. (Mary A. Bell Buford was born in 1838 and died in 1930. She and Rowland are buried in Longwood Cemetery.)
   Parker lists the following children for William Bramlett I/Sr. in her brief history:
1) William Bramblett Jr., who married Anna Ballard and died in 1779; 2) Ambrose, who lived in North Carolina in 1779; 3) James who married a woman named Winifred and died in 1758; 4) Elizabeth who married James Buford in 1761; and 5) Nancy, mentioned in her brother James Bramlett’s will. [Parker also lists as possible children of William I/Sr.:] 6) Lucy who married Thomas Lumpkin on March 4, 1778; 7) Molly who married Stephen Dooley on July 24, 1781; and 8) Aggy, wife of Stephen White. 
However, Lucy and Molly were born and married much later, between seventeen and twenty years, respectively, than Elizabeth Bramlett Buford. Molly [Bramlett] Dooley is a grandchild of William Bramlett I--the daughter of Rev. William II/Jr. and Anna, according to their estate records. Lucy [Bramlett] Lumpkin also is probably a grandchild of William Bramlett I: She may be the only child of James Bramlett who died in Bedford County in 1758 and his wife, Winefred. She is not the daughter of Ambrose Bramlett: He names all of his children in his 1804 will. Nor is she the daughter of Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. and Anna: Their daughter Lucy married Patrick Nenney in 1796 in Bedford County and moved to Tennessee. No daughters have surfaced for Henry I/Sr. of Prince William/Fauquier.)
   Other children of William Bramlett I/Sr. not mentioned by Parker are Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett who first married James Callaway Sr., son of Joseph Callaway, and then second married Leonard “Linus” “Lynah” “Liner” “Leo” Brown, and Henry Bramlett Sr., a planter living in King George County, Va., in 1735 when he bought land in a portion of Prince William County that later became Fauquier County, whose wife is unknown. (King George County in 1735 was adjacent to a portion of Essex County that later became Caroline County where William Bramlett I lived from 1715 to 1747.)
   (Note: Lula Eastman Jeter Parker's 1930s history books, although out of print, are still in high demand and treasured today. She and her White cousin Mary Denham Ackerly co-authored a wonderful book, Our Kin, which includes Boones, Callaways, Bufords, Whites and other allied relatives.) 
   Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America: A Collection of Genealogical Studies, Completely Documented and Appropriately Illustrated, Bearing Upon Notable Early American Lines and Their Collateral Connections (New York: American Historical Company, 1939) contains the following information about the sons of William Bramlett I/Sr. in a section entry titled “Bramlette”:
   William, Ambross and Amhus Bramlette or Bramlett were early bearers of the name in Bedford County, Virginia. It is possible that they were brothers....In the militia rosters contained in Hening’s "Statutes at Large" is found a Bedford County list of September, 1758, in which appear the names of Ambrose Bramlett, sergeant; Amhus Bramlett, and William Bramlett. [Note: Their brother James died 1758 also is listed in the record as a soldier.]
   A William Bramlett was "one of the oldest settlers in Bedford County, and a sergeant in the Colonial Army." He was father of Elizabeth, who married, July 4, 1761, in Bedford County, James Buford, son of John and Judith Beauford, of Culpeper County, Virginia. After carefully considering the land transactions...between Ann Bramlette (widow), her sons, James and Reuben Bramlette, and James Buford, it seems highly probable that William Bramlette, the sergeant, was also the father of William Bramlette [husband of Anna]....” (209-210)

Actually, Hening's Statutes does not designate William I/Sr. or II/Jr. as sergeant, and since William I/Sr. was age 60 in 1755, it seems unlikely he would have served as a sergeant in the military at age 63 in 1758; but perhaps he served as a sergeant during an earlier time. In either case, William I/Sr.. was an early settler of Bedford, as were his children, when it was created in 1754, and he was the father of William II/Jr., James who died 1758, Ambrose, Elizabeth and others. "Amhus" may be a misspelling of Ambrose (Ambus/Ambos); no other reference to "Amhus" has yet been found.
   Since Bible and probate records have not surfaced for some of the early generations, extensive research in official Virginia and South Carolina records has been used to reconstruct William Bramlett I/Sr.’s family: Henry Bramlett Sr., Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr., Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett Callaway Brown, James Bramlett, Nancy (Ann?), Ambrose Bramlett, Elizabeth Bramlett Buford and Agatha “Aggie” Bramlett White.
End Note
   In addition, the Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages biography in a footnote incorrectly identifies Reuben, brother of James and son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr., as Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky.: but the two Reubens lived in different areas in Virginia and definitely are not one and the same. The biography quotes an abstract from Reuben Sr.'s will: “Reuben; his will, dated December 10, 1806, and proved in January, 1807, in Bourbon County, Kentucky (WB-C-198), mentions wife Peggy; son-in-law, John Grinstead; son Hugh; three children in South Carolina, Reuben, Jr., Milly Robertson and Polly Robertson; son William; son Lewis; land I claim from heirs of Martin Pickett, deceased; son Henry. Executors, John Grinstead, Henry and Hugh Bramblett. Witnesses, Will Mitchell, Edward Riley, Reubin Bramblett, Jr.” (209-10). The following portion of the footnote, citing marriages from two different Reubens as the marriages of one Reuben, is incorrect: “Reuben Bramlette married (first) December 10, 1789, Sally Ashton [Abston]; probably (second) Margaret (‘Peggy’)." Reuben, son of Anna Ballard and William Bramlett Jr., returned to Bedford Co., Va., from Fayette Co., Ky., and married Sally Abston; they remained in Virginia, appearing in census records in 1810 and 1820 and court records in 1830. Census records indicate Reuben lived there in 1810 and 1820. Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky., is the son of Henry Bramlett Sr. of Prince William (later Fauquier) Co.,Va., and grandson of William Bramlett I; Reuben Sr. never lived in Bedford County and never married Sally Abston. Reuben Bramblett Sr. married a woman named Margaret “Peggy,” surname unknown, perhaps Darnell/Darnall, and went to Bourbon Co., Ky., from Fauquier County in 1794-95 after trading his Virginia land to Martin Pickett, as documented in Fauquier County deeds and the 1796 tax list for Bourbon Co., Ky. (DB-12:145; DB-12:324). A completely different man, not Reuben Sr. of Bourbon, the Reuben who married Sally Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, may have first applied for a marriage license to wed Lucy Abston, also a daughter of Jesse Abston and sister of Sally Abston, whom Reuben married in 1790. (Jesse Abston signed as surety.) Or Bedford County may have made a mistake, wrote Lucy instead of Sally, when they entered the following record: Dec. __, 1790, Reuben Bramblett and Lucy Abston Married by Joseph Drury.” If Reuben and Lucy did marry, their marriage was later annulled: Lucy Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, later married Joel Callaway in Bedford County on Dec. 27, 1793. Alderson Weeks performed their marriage ceremony. Lucy and Joel applied for their marriage license on Dec. 24, 1793. Thomas Pullen signed as surety, and Lucy is named as the daughter of Jesse Abston. So, Reuben Sr. of Bourbon County is not the son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr.; however, as a son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr., Reuben Sr. is considered a grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr., as is Reuben, son of Rev.W illiam IIJr./II, who married Sally Abston in Bedford County. (No son named Reuben has yet been found for William Bramlett I/Sr.)
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Chapter 3:
Generation 3
HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR. and UNKNOWN
(Known Children: Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr., William Bramblett, Reuben Bramblett Sr.)
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Definite Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis
HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR., believed to be child of Unknown First Wife and William Bramlett I/Sr., was born in or before 1710, most likely in Colonial Virginia. No documentary evidence has been found to connect Henry I/Sr. and William I/Sr. as father and son; however, they lived near each other and William I/Sr. is the only known documented Bramblette who was old enough to have been Henry I/Sr.'s father. Henry I/Sr. probably died intestate between 1752 and 1758, in Prince William (later Fauquier) Co., Va., after he was replaced as constable there in 1752 and before his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture and began paying taxes on it for 1758 in 1759. No will, probate or Bible records have surfaced for Henry I/Sr. His burial place is unknown. The name of his wife is unknown.
Henry Bramlett Sr.'s Life in Virginia
   Henry I/Sr. was a planter living in Brunswick Parish in King George Co., Va., in 1735 when he purchased half of a contiguous tract of 500 acres--250 acres--of land in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., from a man named John Ambrose. The recorded “lease” or first deed of their transaction indicates “John Ambrose of Brunswick Parish King George, planter” sold 250 acres on Elk Marsh Run adjacent to Jonas William’s line to “Henry Bramblet of same, planter” for twenty-five pounds sterling. John Ambrose owned about 500 acres of land in Prince William County, which he may have inherited He sold half of it to Henry Bramlett I/Sr. John Ambrose then acknowledged the sale to “Henry Bramblet” in a “release” or second deed for the land, which was recorded in Prince William Co., Va., Court on Sept. 17, 1735 (DB-B:480-482). The transaction was witnessed by George Harrison, John James and Hugh West. (In Virginia in the early 1700s, one deed, known as a bargain and sale--or two deeds--a lease and release--could be prepared and recorded to transfer a full title when land was sold or traded.) Available land at that point was scarce in Virginia and generally sold or transferred to family, so it is conceivable to consider a familial relationship by blood or marriage between Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and/or William Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose and/or his wife, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington. John Ambrose was born in Rappahannock Co., Va., circa 1684, according to a 1747 deposition stating his age as 63, (making him a contemporary of William Bramlett I/Sr.) and died at about age 72 in 1756. Elizabeth Ambrose states her age as 36 in her 1747 deposition, which meaans she was born circa 1711-1712 (DB-L:12-13). They were deposed witnesses in a case regarding a land title dispute between neighbors. Planter Henry I/Sr. and planter and church warden John Ambrose both moved their families from King George County and farmed adjoining tracts of land on Elk Marsh Run, Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, beginning in 1735.
   John Ambrose and John Champe, relationship unknown, both Church Wardens of the Parish of Brunswick, King George Co., Va., bought 200 acres of land in Parish of Brunswick, King George Co., Va., for 100 pounds sterling money of Great Britain from Hugh French, Gentleman, of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., Va., on May 31, and June 1, 1733 (DB-1729-1735:260-262/DB-1A:260-262). Deeds of lease and release with receipt of money recorded June 1, 1733. Hugh French's wife on May 4, 1733, appointed a representative for her dower release: "Know all men I Mary French, wife of Hugh French appoint Thomas Turner my lawfull Attorney" in the "sale of 200 acres conveyed by my husband to John Champe & John Ambris Church Wardens for a Glebe for the said Parish of Brunswick" in order to "relinquish my right of dower." The power of attorney was recorded June 1, 1733. Mary French, daughter of Original and Jane (Brooks) Browne and wife of first husband, Francis Triplett, died after the above record and before Oct. 5, 1736, when Hugh French wrote his will in Stafford County and named children but no wife (WB-M:247).
   Henry Brinbett” is included on a 1738 Virginia Rent Roll.
   Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose’s residences are mentioned as landmarks in several recorded deeds, and Henry I/Sr. witnessed a few documents in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., during various years up to 1750-51. They lived near Tinpot Run and Elk Marsh Run and Licking Run and Welches' Rolling Road. Henry Bramlett I/Sr.’s property is mentioned as a landmark on a deed written March 16, 1744, when James Genn bought some land for his neighbor Catesby Cock/e of Fairfax County. The land, situated on Elk Marsh Run and Tinpot Run and Welches Rolling Road, was adjacent to property already owned by Catesby Cock/e and adjacent to property then owned by Henry Bramblet, Jonas Williams, Morgan Darnall, Nathaniel Dodd, John Bush and someone named Garner, Gardner or Gardiner. James Genn surveyed the property. Daniel Marr, Nathaniel Dodd and William Cairn witnessed the deed, which was recorded in Prince William County on Aug. 30, 1745 (DB-1745/46). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on Aug. 21-22, 1746, when James Genn of Prince William County sold to John Higgins some property in Hamilton Parish on the branches of Elk Marsh and Tinpot runs. The property “bounded...along the land of Morgan Darnall to a Hickory and one red and 1 box Oak corner of said Darnall & Jonas Williams then with Williams line N. E. to a black Oak & Hickory in the said line Corner of Henry Bramblets land thence with Bramblets line N.W. to a large marked Hickory another of Bramblets corners thence No. W. to a box Oak by Welches Roling Road Corner of said Bramblet thence with another of his lines No. E. to a Spanish Oak on the side of a stony Ridge thence N. Wt. to a large live Oak in a Pond...” (DB-1745/46:173-77; GB-F:244). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on March 11, 1745, when Augustine Jennings, planter of Prince William, bought property next to him from Honer and planter Jonas T. Williams: a “parcel of land containing One hundred and eight acres being in the Parish of Hamilton and County of Prince William adjoyning to a tract of land one part whereof in possession of John Ambros the other part whereof in possession of Henry Bramlet....” The acreage was granted to Jonas Williams on March 6, 1718, and was currently in possession of Augustine Jennings as a result of a one-year indenture. The cost was 3,000 pounds of lawfull Tobacco Current money of Virginia. Jno. Crump and John Bohanan witnessed the deed on March 24, 1745 (DB-1745/56:36-40). Henry Bramlett later witnessed Augustine Jennings's will on Dec. 13, 1776, in Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, and it was probated there Aug. 24, 1778 (WB-1:348). (Peter Barker and Lucretia Russell also witnessed the document. Heirs include wife Hannah, daughter Betty, daughter Hannah, daughter Sally, daughter Jemima Hudnall, daughter Nancy Weathers, son William, son Benjamin, son Baylor, son George, son Berryman, son Lewis, son Augustin Jennings. One Jennings daughter, Fanny, married curca 1767 Thomas Obannon, son of Samuel Obannon, nephew of Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington. One of Thomas Obannon's sons is named John Ambrose Obannon.) Henry I/Sr.’s property is again mentioned as a landmark in a deed written March 30, 1748, when William Kernes bought some Prince William County land nearby. The land, situated on Licking Run, adjoined property then owned by someone named Page, Major Catesby Cocke, Thomas Stone, Henry Bramblet and John Ambrose who farmed adjoining tracts of land, and Colonel Carter. The deed was recorded April 2, 1748, in Prince William County (DB-1745/56:42). Henry I/Sr. also is listed on the 1751 Prince William Co., Va., tithable list, which records taxes for certain tithables and particular items of personal property. Henry I/Sr. witnessed a deed on Feb. 5, 1750/51, which records a transaction between John Darnall and Morgan Darnall regarding the dividing line of property left to them by the Darnall's deceased father, Morgan Darnall Sr., in Hamilton Parish of Prince William County. The bond later was recorded Feb. 28, 1760 (DB-1759/78:59-60).
   One recorded reference to Henry I/Sr. in Prince William County Court documents indicates that, in addition to being a planter, he also was the constable there in 1752 when he was replaced. No reason was given. An entry in Prince William County Court Minute Book on Nov. 27, 1752, indicates Thomas Gardner was appointed constable “in the Room of Henry Bramlet.” Gardner was ordered that day to “go before some Justice of the peace and be sworn accordingly” there (MB-1:77). Although no reason is given in the court record, the act of replacement suggests Henry I/Sr. may have been seriously ill or already dead. At about age 42-50, he probably was not ready to retire due to old age. No other existing court, land or tax records have been found that refer to him as being alive or dead in Prince William or Fauquier County or any other place in Virginia after 1752. It appears his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture by 1758. Tax records indicate Henry I/Sr.'s other two sons--William and Reuben Sr.--had their own separate land in 1759. Henry I/Sr.'s three sons also owned their own land in Fauquier Co., Va., in 1770, according to the Rent Roll, which lists Henry Bramlett (Jr.) with 250 acres. father's former land, Reuben Bramlett with 150 acres and William Bramlett with 123 acres. Henry II/Jr. apparently did not farm the plantation while living next to John Ambrose since the latter died circa 1756. The latter's wife, Elizabeth Obannon, married again to John Etherington (a.k.a. Edrington) circa 1762, and he also died before October 1769, before Nov. 29, 1776, when she wrote her will as Elizabeth Etherington in Fauquier County (WB-1:323). Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. witnessed her will, which was probated March 23, 1778. (Elizabeth's heirs include Catherine Nelson, Betty Allen, Catherine Duncan, Benjamin Russell, nephew Thomas Obannon son of her brother Samuel and wife, Stelle Obannon, Capt.. John Wright. Elias Edmonds Sr. and Jeremiah Darnall were named executors; other witnesses: Berryman Jennings, James Wright.) Elizabeth Obannon was born circa 1716-1720, the daughter of Bryant Boru Obannon, as he named himself in his will, reportedly an immigrant from Ireland, and, according to family tradition, first wife, Zena Sarah Isham. (Daughter Elizabeth Ambrose is named as an heir of 60 pounds current money and horses in Bryant Boru Ambrose's 1760 will [WB-1:41].)
   Henry I/Sr. and wife had three known sons: Henry Jr., William and Reuben Sr. If he had daughters, unfortunately, their names are unknown.
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Chapter 3:
Generation 4
Henry Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. and Margaret “Peggy” Unknown
(Children: Marianne, Benjamin, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, perhaps William, John, Nathan, perhaps Sarah, Nancy)
Virginia State Seal aand Motto: Thus Ever to Tyrants
Definite Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis
Henry Harry” Bramlett II/Jr., child of Unknown and Henry Bramlett I/Sr., was born circa 1730 in Colonial Virginia. Since Henry II/Jr. had possession of his father's former plantation in Fauquier County and Henry Sr. died intestate under the laws of primogeniture, Henry II/Jr. can be considered the eldest son and heir to his father's property. He died in 1779 or 1780, definitely before Aug. 5, 1780, most likely in Virginia. His burial place is unknown. Recorded deeds indicate Henry Jr. died a suicide but do not indicate where or why. No documentation has been offered or independently discovered, but family tradition holds that Henry II/Jr. became distraught and inconsolable and took his own life after the death of his eldest son, Benjamin, who reportedly perished as a soldier or patriot while being held on a British prison ship during the American Revolution.
   Henry II/Jr. married Margaret Unknown circa 1750, probably in Virginia. Her birth date and place and parents are unknown. She died sometime after she sold her Laurens Co., S. C., farm to her son Nathan in 1809. Her burial place is unknown, but she may rest near Gray Court, S. C., in the old cemetery section of Bramlett United Methodist Church, which she co-founded, next to the graves of her son Nathan and his wife, Elizabeth Gray, whose graves are still marked with inscribed tombstones and footstones: N. B. and E. B. There are three field or native stones without inscriptions next to Elizabeth and Nathan's graves.
   Henry II/Jr. was a planter who inherited his father’s 250-acre Bramlett Plantation through primogeniture between 1752 and 1758. Henry II/Jr. and his brother Reuben Sr. witnessed a deed for Morgan Darnall, perhaps one of Reuben Sr.’s in-laws, in 1760 in Fauquier County (MB-1:92). Henry “Harry Bramblett” II/Jr. witnessed neighbor Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington’s will, which was proved in court in 1778 (MB-5:307). Henry II/Jr.’s relationship to her is not given in the document, but family or close friends traditionally witnessed important documents such as wills and deeds. The will identifies her as the widow of John Etherington deceased and names a nephew with the surname Obannon as one of her heirs. Elizabeth may not have had children who survived since none were named as heirs in the will.
   After Henry II/Jr. died by Aug. 5, 1780, and his son Henry III inherited the Bramlett Plantation, the land was resurveyed as a tract of 231 acres. Henry II/Jr.’s widow, Margaret “Peggy” Bramblett/Bramlett paid taxes on the property in the county from 1782 to 1784. When the land was sold by Henry Bramlett (III) of “96 District, S. C.” to James and Ann Dobie/Dobey in 1784, the deed indicated the widow, Margaret Bramlett, was occupying the plantation (DB-9:144). Margaret then moved to live on a different tract of land there--50 acres--until 1790 when she left the state. She lived in the land tax district of B. Edward Humston, Fauquier County Tax Commissioner. Margaret Bramlett paid her taxes--125 pounds or 18 shillings 9 pence after deducting quitrents--on 250 acres, her former husband's plantation, in 1783. On the smaller property after she moved, she was assessed to pay 17 pounds 18 shillings 4 pence in taxes on the 50-acre tract in 1790--but only paid 5 shillings 4 pence after deducting quitrents. She last paid taxes in the same amount on the second property in 1791 for the year 1790. When the Dobies later sold the Bramlett Plantation and additional property, amounting to 244 acres, in 1794 to Benjamin Dodd, the deed described it as once belonging to “Henry Bramblet, a suicide” (DB-12:60).
Margaret Bramlett, Wife of Henry "Harry" Bramlett II/Jr.
Resident of Virginia, Patriot of the Revolution, Resident of South Carolina, Methodist Leader 

Margaret Bramlett, Wife of Henry "Harry" Bramlett II/Jr.
   Not much is known about Margaret, but she is highly regarded today as a Patriot of the Revolution and an individual with deep religious convictions. Margaret, named as “Peggy Bramlett” and “Margaret Bramlett,” is documented as a Patriot of the Revolution in Fauquier County “Publick Claims” that she filed after the war for providing supplies--beef and brandy--to Gen. George Washington's Continental Army. “Peggy Bramlett” first presented a certificate and applied for compensation for the listed provisions "At a court held for Fauquier County 24 March 1782 and continued by several adjournments till 3 May following. The court pursuant to the act of Assembly entitled 'an act for adjusting claims for property impressed or taken for public services' [by the military] examined the...claims and valued each article in specie viz Beef at the rate of 3p [pence] per pound....” Peggy Bramlett 225 (1). The claims lists also indicate “Margt. Bramlett” also presented on Nov. 25, 1785, a certificate granted by Col. William Edmonds for compensation by the county for earlier providing 3 1/2 gallons of brandy to the American troops (13).
   Shortly before or just after husband Henry Jr. died, Margaret and her children joined the Methodist Church in Virginia and in 1780 or 1781 founded their own meeting house or religious group which became Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court, Laurens Co., S. C. Her sons Henry III, Nathan and John were the co-founders with Margaret of Bramlett Methodist Church. Margaret had a meeting house near the present-day location of Bramlett Church after she relocated from Virginia in 1790. Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) is the mother church of John Bramlett’s meeting house, Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church, founded circa 1799-1801 in Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S. C.

   One of the most important records yet found for Henry II/Jr. and Margaret's family: a Diary kept by their grandson Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette. The Burditt Diary was located in family papers in South Carolina and preserved and shared, Thank God, by Martha Anne Curry Duke of Texas. The Burditt Diary not only documents the early founding year of Bramlett Church and the names of the founders and surnames of members, but also provides documentation for the connection between Henry III, John and Nathan as biological brothers and sons of Margaret. (Other records definitely connect the brothers with their father, mother and siblings, including Marianne and Reuben.) Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt is the son of Frederick Reuben Burdett and second wife, Sarah Elizabeth Rhodes. Born in 1833, he died in 1892 and rests in the old section of Bramlett Church Cemetery with a tombstone that identifies him as Rev. F. H. Burdette. He was a resident of Laurens County, a member of the church and acted as a lay minister before being officially ordained in 1866 after he returned to the community from serving as a soldier during the War Between the States. He apparently wrote or dispatched a verbal question via a messenger to his Great-Uncle John Bramlett in Greenville County before John died in 1855 and got a reply that John "sent" to a question about the origins of the church. A transcript with additions in brackets for missing words on the copy follows:
First Qurt. [Quarterly] Con[ference] in 1783 John Bram[lett] sent. from the [best] information the [church] had been organized three years before Preachers who they wer[e] is unknown only as we remember hearing old pe[ople] speak such as Bingham, Travice, Tarply, Hilly[ard] Judge, Stafford, Asbury and others. The members consisted of three or four families viz Wm. Bramletts, Dacus, Robertson and prob[ably] Stone. John, Nathan or Henry Bramletts were th[e] founders with their Moth[er] in the year 1780 or 81 but the best information say[s] in 80 by what minis[ter] is unknown. Some supp[ose] Asbury others Travice while others Hillyard Judge, but the last name live[d] some where from 1800 to 1820.
[Burditt Diary Image]
The given name of the Bramlett Mother Founder is not written on the page, but other South Carolina and Virginia records name her in connection with her husband and children as Margaret, widow of Henry Bramlett II/Jr. The diary entry itself is not dated and Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt could have written it anytime before he died in 1892, but it probably was written in the early 1850s before John Bramlett died in 1855.


Bramlett United Methodist Church was co-founded in 1780 or 1781, according to Father John Bramlett, by John, his mother, Margaret Bramlett, and two of her other sons, "Nathan and or Henry" (III). The church still holds services on the same property deeded by Nathan Bramlett and George Sims and sold to the trustees for $5 in 1807.
Margaret was recognized as leader of Bramlett Church in Laurens County in November 1801 by Methodist Episcopal Bishop Francis Asbury in his Journal: “Wednesday [November] 21. We rode sixteen miles to the widow Bramblet’s meeting-house.” This was a church building or her home on her property or Nathan's land near the current church. Two days earlier the Bishop visited Margaret’s son John Bramlett at Bethel Church in Greenville County: “Monday [November] 20. At John Bramblet’s, Greensville. After meeting, we rode to ...Reedy River” (p. 40). This may have been the visit during which the Bishop formally organized Bethel Church. In his 1802 Journal, the Bishop recognized Margaret’s son Nathan Bramlett as leader of Bramlett Church, which he once called “Bramblet’s Chapel”: “Wednesday 22....Next day I went to Nathan Bramblet’s....Sunday 27. At Bramblet’s chapel I spoke on Acts ii. 37-39.”
   Nathan, born in 1766, and John, born in 1764, were not old enough to found a church in 1780 or 1781, the date provided by John; however, it is known from Nathan's tombstone inscription and John's obituary that they both joined the Methodist Church when they were young men, John specifically about that time--1780--when he was age 16, so they were very early/charter members of Bramlett Church. Henry III was born earlier, was the eldest son in 1780 since he inherited through primogeniture his father's former Virginia plantation. Henry III was born circa 1755, before his brother Reuben, who was born March 15, 1757. He would have been an adult and old enough to organize and found a church with his mother, Margaret, in 1780; and recorded Virginia deeds indicate Henry III was living in Laurens County at exactly that time. Henry III was in South Carolina earlier, in 1775-1776 when his son Reuben and daughter Margaret were born there and while he served as a soldier during the Revolution. Henry III and possibly other members of his close family may have traveled to Laurens County with his Uncle William Bramblett and family, who were early members of Bramlett Church and settled on his land grant there in 1774. That year, 1774, appears as a possible organizational or founding date for Bramlett Church in "A History of Bramlett," co-written by member Ruth Wallace Cheshire and pastor Rev. George B. Wilson for The 1962 Church Journal. They quote a respected, long-time member as the source of some interesting details about the church's early organization. "C. R. Wallace (1856-1916), a venerable and diligent servant of God, has bequeathed the following information:"
   About 1774, or two years before the Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson, just thirty years after the first Methodist Conference was held in the old Foundry Church in London, England, a few people living in this community who were strong adherents of the Methodist faith, met in the home of a family who lived a few hundred yards west of where the house (the present church building), and held religious services. The services were conducted at regular intervals for two or three years. As interest in these meetings increased the need for more room was felt, and they decided to change the place of meeting. A log house was built. This log house was located one-fourth of one mile and a little south of east from this point. There the services were continued for several years. For four years after these meetings began, there was no organized society here. It was not until 1779 that this church was organized. In the little graveyard just across the road from this house is the sleeping dust of him whose name it bears.
The man referenced as the church namesake, of course, is Nathan Bramlett, whose inscribed tombstone still memorializes him in the old section of the cemetery, and who gave land to the trustees in 1807 "for the purpose of Secureing a Meeting house, thereon Standing and to Remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church." This part of the recorded deed indicates a church building was already in existence on the site, which means the church was founded before the 1807 date of the document. The namesake family referenced, of course, is the family of Henry Bramlett Jr. and Margaret, especially Henry III, which suggests he and perhaps his parents, still residents of Virginia, were in South Carolina as early as 1774. They had grown children, Marianne and Henry III, living there. Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette, were in Laurens County in 1775. There is evidence that indicates Henry III was in South Carolina by 1775-1776 and in 1780. He most likely lived and worked with relatives or leased or purchased land through a private transaction. He and sister Marianne as well apparently lived very close to the current location of Bramlett United Methodist Church before later obtaining land through war grants. Henry II/Jr.'s brother William and family lived quite a distance and southeast from the church in 1774.
 
   Margaret Bramlett permanently settled in Laurens County later, in 1790. She bought her 50-acre South Carolina farm next to her son Nathan's farm in Laurens County on May 10, 1791, from Ezekiel Griffith for 20 pounds:
This indenture made the Tenth day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred & ninety one, and in the Sixteenth year of American Independency, Between Ezekiel Griffeth of Laurens county in the state of South Carolina on the one part, and Margaret Bramlett of the county & State aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth that the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for & in consideration of the sum of Twenty pounds to him in hand well & Truly paid by the sd. Margaret Bramlett the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged Have Bargained, granted, sold, aliened Embossed & confirmed, and by these presents doth Grant, Bargain & Sell, alien emboss [Riban?] & confirm unto the said Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns forever part of a Tract of land Situate & Lying on Beaverdam Creek water of Enoree River, to begin on the north side of sd. creek on a Red Oak on a stoney nole, Thence to the corner in Nathan Bramlett's field, Thence along the sd. Nathan Bramlett's to the corner, Thence to the creek & up the creek to the mouth of the spring branch & up the branch to the head, Thence to the Begining to contain Fifty acres more or less, & hath such shape, form & marks as are represented by a plat thereof to the Original grant annexed, which was granted to the said Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs & assigns forever on the Twenty fourth day of January, one Thousand seven hundred & seventy by the ... William Bull Then Governor and Recorded in ... office in Book EEE page 68 and also the Reversion and Reversions, Remainder & Remainders, Rents, ... & Profits thereof & all the Estate, Right, Title, Interest Claim & demand whatsoever of him the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs or assigns to have and to hold the sd. Tract of fifty acres of land more or less with every appurtenance thereunto belonging to the only proper use & behoof of her the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs or assigns forever &tc the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for him his heirs & assigns doth covenant with the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns that he the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth now is & untill the execution of these presents shall stand seized in his right of a good sure perfect, absolute indefeasible Estate of Inheritance in fee simple of & in all & singular the tract of land & every part & parcel hereof without any manner of condition... (DB-D:5-6)
Margaret sold her farm on Zak's/Zek's/Zeak's or Beaverdam Creek, waters of Enoree River, to her son Nathan Bramlett for $100 on April 16, 1809. (The creek may have been known locally as Zek's after the former landowner, Ezekiel Griffith.) The deed indicates the land was originally granted to Ezekiel Griffith on Jan. 20, 1770, and conveyed to Margaret Bramlett on May 10, 1791. Margaret's grandson John Burditt and Jesse Gray witnessed the 1809 deed (DB-J:73). No other later record of Margaret has yet been found.
   Margaret and Henry II/Jr.’s children are Marianne, Benjamin, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, perhaps William, John, Nathan and perhaps Sarah and Nancy.
Works Cited For Margaret Bramlett
Asbury, Rev. Francis. The Journal of the Rev. Francis Asbury, bishop of the Methodist Episcopal church. New York: The Methodist Episcopal Church, N. Bangs and T. Mason, 1821. p. 40. 1801 referencesto Widow (Margaret) Bramblet, Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church, and reference to (Margaret's son) John Bramblet, regarding Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church: https://archive.org/stream/00612616.874.emory.edu/00612616874#page/n41/mode/2up.
--. The Journal. The Methodist Episcopal Church. p. 86. 1802 references to Nathan Bramblet, Bramlett Church -- “Bramblet's Chapel”: https://archive.org/stream/00612616.874.emory.edu/006 12616_874#page/n87/mode/2up.
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Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette
(Children: John, Henry, Margaret, Mary Ann, Reuben, Elizabeth, William, Ailsey, Jesse)
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Frederick Burdette served as a Soldier during the American Revolution

South Carolina State Seal and Motto: While I Breathe, I Hope
Marianne Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born Sept. 15, 1752, in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that later became Fauquier County. She died at age 81 years, 5 months, 21 days, on March 8, 1834, in Laurens Co., S. C. Family tradition shared in the past by family historian William Ralph Burdette and others holds that Marianne rests at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church Cemetery near Gray Court in Laurens County. Her grave has not yet been located; however, there are graves marked with field stones in the old section of the cemetery near the graves of Marianne’s brother Nathan Bramlett and his wife, Elizabeth Gray, which still have inscribed tombstones. Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette, and Marianne and Nathan’s mother, Margaret, may occupy those unmarked graves. A will and probate records have not been found for Marianne. She and Frederick were living in Laurens County with or near some of her Bramlett relatives by 1775, and they settled and remained there all of their lives on a land grant near the Enoree after the Revolution.

Direct descendants Martha Anne (Curry) Duke and Franklin Donald Burdette provide most of the following about Marianne’s marriage to Frederick, his war service, Bible records and children.
The Marriage of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette
   Marianne married Frederick Burdette circa 1775, probably in Fauquier County where she and her parents were living. However, it is possible they married in South Carolina. Their first child, Henry, was born there in 1776. A deed recorded in Laurens County in 1790 indicates Frederick was in South Carolina when it was written in 1775. “Fredrick” was born Oct. 15, 1753, according to the Burdette Bibles. The names of Frederick’s parents are not yet known. Descendant William Ralph Burdette believed Frederick was born in Amsterdam, Holland, of French parents who came from Normandy, France. (William Ralph is son of Ella Towns Black and David Wilcut Jr. and grandson of David Wilcut and Zelena McPherson Burdett.) Ralph indicates in an unpublished written history that Frederick’s parents may have been Huguenots, French Protestants, who fled France to Holland to escape religious and ethnic persecution and later settled in Colonial America. There are early records of some Burdettes who lived in Amsterdam during the 1730s; 1750s; however, no definite evidence has yet been found to document the Huguenot connection. DNA evidence has not yet yielded enough connections to discern definite names of Frederick’s parents.
Will, Death, Estate of Frederick Burdette
   Frederick Burdette died at age 87 years, 3 months, 25 days, on Feb. 10, 1841, in Laurens County and most likely was buried there beside Marianne, by tradition in the old section of the cemetery at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court. Burial records or tombstones with legible inscriptions have not been located for them, but there are some fieldstone markers in the graveyard very near Nathan Bramlett’s inscribed tombstone which may be the final resting places of Frederick, Marianne and her mother, Margaret. Frederick wrote his Last Will and Testament on Nov. 30, 1826, in Laurens County, leaving his land to three grown children--William, Molly, Ailsey--and eventually to son William if the two daughters married or died, and if William predeceased them, after their deaths the estate would be divided among his other children or their heirs. Sons John and William, named as administrators, presented the will in court on March 1, 1841, and it was proved there by William on March 16, 1841 (Box 83, pkg. 2).
State of South Carolina} Laurens District}
In the name of God, amen, I Frederick Burditt of the State and District aforesaid being of sound and disposing mind and memory, but weak in body, and calling to mind the uncertainty of life, and being desirous to dispose of such worldly Estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with, do make and ordain this my last Will in manner following, that is to say:I give to my son William Burdit, and my two daughters now living with me, Molly and Ailsey Burditt, the plantation and tract of land whereon I now live, together with the Horses, Cows, Hogs and stock of every kind, Household and Kitchen furniture, plantation Tools, Waggon & Reins [geirs?] and Blacksmiths Tools, to them for their material benefit and support so long as they all live together but should either or both of my daughters above named marry or be disposed to seperate and leave the place, then and in that case it is my will that she or they take such part of my personal property as shall be her or their equal distributive share, and that the tract of land remain my son William[’s] in fee simple forever after his two sisters, Molly and Ailsey have married, died or other wise left him, provided, however, that my son William Burditt should die before his two sisters Molly and Ailsey, having no law full issue, then the said tract of land to remain the property of the daughters during their natural life time and at their death to be sold and the monies arising therefrom to be equally divided among the whole of my children or their lawful representatives share and share alike. I give to my grand daughter Ailsey Gray a certain Red cow and calf which she now claims, Eight head of sheep, and the bed and furniture which she has always claimed. And lastly, I do constitute and appoint my son William Burditt and Robert Hand Senr. Executors of this my last Will and testament by me heretofore made. In testamony whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal this thirtieth day of November 1826. Frederick (his x mark) Burditt Seal Signed, sealed, published and declared as and for the last will and testament of the above named Frederick Burditt in presence of us Thos. Wright Arch. Young John Harriss.
State of South Carolina} Laurens District} Personally appeared before me Archibald Young, John Harriss & Thomas Wright who being sworn as the law directs made oath they saw Frederick Burditt Execute the within instrument as his last Will and that they in the presence of Each other and in the presence of the testator subscribed as witnesses to the same sworn to before me the 16th day of March, One Thousand Eight Hundred and forty one.W. D. Watts O.L.D. [Ordinary of Laurens District] Archd. Young John Harriss Ths. Wright 
South Carolina} Laurens District} To W. D. Watts Ordinary of said District. The Petition of William Burditt showeth that Frederick Burditt late of said District recently died having first Executed his last will in which he names your Petitioner as one of his Executors, he therefore prays that you would grant him a citation to have the said will proven in solemn form and your Petitioner will pray &tc. This 1 March 1841. William (his x mark) Burditt 
South Carolina} Laurens District} Whereas William Burdett has made suit to me to have the will of Frederick Burdett proven in solemn form. Then and there fore to Cite and admonish all and singular the Kindred and Creditors of the late Frederick Burdett said to be and appear before me Archibald Young on the sixteenth day of March Inst. to show cause if any they can why the said will should not be proven and letters Testamentary granted to William Burdett who is named as one of the Executors to said will. Given under my hand & seal this the 1st March 1841 W. D. Watts O.L.D. State of South Carolina,} Laurens District.} Warrant of Appraisement By W. D. Watts Ordinary of said district. These are to authorize and empower you, or any three or four of you, whose names are here under written, to repair to all such parts and places within this State, as you shall be directed unto by William Burditt Excr. of the goods and chattels, rights and credits of Frederick Burditt deceased, wheresoever any of the said goods and chattels are or do remain within the said parts and places, and which shall be shown unto you by the said William Burditt and there view and appraise all and every the said goods and chattels, being first duly sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, to make a true and perfect inventory and appraisement thereof, and to cause the same to be returned under your hands, or any three or four of you, unto the said William Burditt on or before the 16th day of May next.Witness W. D. Watts Esquire, Ordinary of the said district, the 16th day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty one and in the Sixty fifth year of American Independence. To Messrs. Benjamin Martin Jesse Gray James B. Higgins & David Higgins
Memorandum -- That on the fifth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty one personally appeared before me Thomas Wright, one of the Magistrates assigned to keep the peace in Sd. District, Jesse Gray, James B. Higgins and David Higgins being three of the appraisers appointed to appraise the goods and chattels of Frederick Burditt late of Laurens District deceased, who being duly sworn, made oath that they would make a just and true appraisement of all and singular, the goods and chattels of the said Frederick Burditt deceased, and that they would return the same, certified under their hands, unto the said William Burditt on or before the of 16th of May next. Sworn the day and year above written, before me, Thos. Wright, M. for L. D.
The appraisement, which lists the following items and their value, was provided to William Burditt by Jesse Gray, James B. Higgins and David Higgins. 
Stock of hogs -- cattle and sheep $55.50 Waggon & gear and 1 lot of waggon ... 11.00 1 lot of Carpenters tools -- grindstone &c 5.00 1 lot of plantation tools -- drawing chains & log chains 14.25 1 cutting knife & box -- oats -- Riddle &c 3.00 1 stack of fodder & 1 lot of corn 24.00 1 gray Mare 60.00 1 lot of baskets & old irons 2.00 Bacon - Lard and barrels 32.00 Cupboard & furniture 1 lot of books & 2 tables 18.00 9 sitting chairs - 1 box and lot of bed clothing 23.00 2 beds - bedsteads & furniture 20.00 Shoe makers tools - shot gun & pouch 1 saddle & bridle 9.00 1 trunk & 1 can & bottles 3.00 1 lot of sundries (up stairs) 9.25 Castings - tin ware - pewter - knives forks &c 28.12 1 Loom & apparatus 5.00 Kitchen dresser & cupboard 2.00 Jugs - jars - sieve - gun powder - shots &c 6.00 1 half bushel measure - boxes - barrels - wheat & salt 7.00 4 sitting chairs & candlestick 2.60 1 lot of blacksmith tools - jointers - chisels & gouges 14.00 one note due the 25 of December next for one tract of land 236 acres 40.00 Total $708
After William, Ailsey and Mary Ann “Molly” died, Frederick’s estate, administered by son John Burdett, was sold in 1873 and the proceeds were distributed among the surviving heirs of Frederick’s other deceased children who could be identified and located: Henry, John, Margaret and Reuben Burdett. Some heirs at law, including Nathan B. Burditt, Eliza Ann Curry, Frederick Burditt and others not named--contested the administration of John Burdett of his father’s estate on Jan. 28, 1873, in Laurens County, but lost the lawsuit. A notice naming the three contesting heirs and “others,” advising them John would settle the estate by court order, was published on Feb. 1873. The distribution of the estate, amounting to $1,744.24, was settled March 21, 1873. Part of the settlement was recorded March 22 in Laurens. There were two sales for Frederick’s personal estate. The first sale on July 11, 1876, generated $320.64. The second sale on Oct. 10, 1876, generated $1,555.81. Purchasers listed include Wesley Burdett, who bought 1 lot of clothing & Bible and other items; John Burdett, a spinning wheel and other items; Elizabeth Burton, “2 smoothing irons” and a bed and furniture and other items; Peter Waddle, chairs and axes; Ivory Curry, smith tools, dried fruit, two trunks, chairs, two looking glasses, clothing, other items; and Jesse Burditt, “1 Bibell” and clothing. Frederick’s son William entered the will for probate in Laurens Co., S. C., Court on March 1, 1841. The court issued a warrant of appraisement on estate of Frederick Burditt April 5, 1841, in Laurens. 
Decree Whereas the names of many of the parties interested in this Estate are unknown to the Court - It is Ordered Decreed that the said Estate be divided as follows. One Share to the Children and representative of Henry Burdett decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of John Burditt decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of Margaret Gray decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of Reuben Burdett decd. according to their respective rights. March 21st 1873. Given under my hand and Seal of Office C. Lark Judge of Probate Court L. C.
The settlement documents indicate four shares of Frederick’s estate, each amounting to $436.46, were to be paid out by John Burdett. The names of the recipient heirs, “unknown by the court,” are not documented in the estate records. The documents indicate Frederick’s coffin, made by J. M. Riddle, cost $6.00. Property taxes for Frederick’s land amounted to $9.75. The estate paid an attorney, B. W. Ball, a total of $50.00. Probate fees to Laurens County amounted to $12 in 1873. A number of other payments were made to individuals for debts and services rendered.
Marianne and Frederick in South Carolina
   Frederick was living in Ninety-Six (Laurens) District in 1775, according to the aforementioned deed written and recorded there. Since Frederick and Marianne’s first child was born there in 1776, she probably was living with him there in 1775 as well. Her brother Henry Bramlett III was in the same area in 1776-1780: later Georgia census records indicate he had a child, daughter Margaret, born in South Carolina in 1776, and his stated residence in the 1780 Bramlett land resurvey recorded in Virginia is “Laurens Dist., S. C.” Marianne’s Aunt Elizabeth and Uncle William Bramblett and family, who moved to South Carolina by 1773 when their royal land grant from Gov. William Bull and King George III was surveyed, also lived nearby. Revolutionary War pension records indicate Marianne’s brother Reuben Bramlett, one of the three first cousins with that given name born in the same generation in Fauquier County, was stationed for three months in South Carolina on the Indian Line as a soldier during the war in 1780 or 1781; however 1787, the birth year of Reuben’s second son Henry, is the first definite date of his residency in South Carolina. Later census records indicate at least two of Reuben’s children were born in South Carolina: Henry in 1787 and Nathan in 1799. (He later moved into Christian Co., Ky., circa 1801 and then settled in 1818 in a portion of Gallatin Co., Ill., that later became Saline County in 1847.) Marianne’s brother John went to Laurens County from Fauquier County circa 1785. Marianne’s brother Nathan may have gone to South Carolina at the same time, but was definitely in Laurens County by 1789 when bought land there. Laurens County census records indicate Marianne also may have had at least two or three other sisters who moved in South Carolina with their mother, Margaret, by 1790. Marianne’s mother, Margaret, bought land adjacent to Nathan’s farm in 1791.
   Frederick’s name first appears in existing Laurens County records in that December 1775 deed: “Fredk. Burdett” and “Wm. Bramlet”  (Marianne’s uncle) witnessed the deed on Dec. 10-11, 1775, when their neighbor William Vaughn, a “planter of Craven Co, Prev, of S. C.,” and his wife, Barbara Vaughn, sold two hundred acres of land on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River in Laurens District to John Stone (DB-C:159). The land was part of a 400-acre grant to William Vaughn on Jan. 16, 1772. The Vaughns owned land adjacent to Marianne’s Uncle William Bramblett’s 1773 William Bull land grant property. (The “William Bramlet” who witnessed the 1775 deed is the owner of the 1773 loyal and grant and Frederick’s uncle by marriage, the brother of Marianne’s father, Henry Jr.) Frederick Burdett and William Bramlet may have been signing as witnesses for John Stone. Stone’s land also adjoined the property that Margaret Bramlett, Henry Jr.’s widow, bought in Laurens County in 1791. Stones also were early members of Bramlett Methodist Church. William Thompson also witnessed the 1775 deed, probably for the Vaughns. The deed was recorded April 27, 1790, in Laurens County. To legally witness a deed in 1775, Frederick had to have been at least age 21, thus born in/before 1754, which is consistent with his documented birth year: 1753. “Fredk. Burdett” also witnessed a deed in Laurens County on Nov. 28, 1789, when Richard Fowler and wife, Debby, sold Nathan Bramlett his 225 acres of land “where sd N. B. now lives” on “Zeack’s” Branch (Beaverdam Creek) of Enoree River for “45 pounds proclamation money” (DB-C:131). The land was originally granted to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. Other witnesses: William Stone and Reuben Bramlett (most likely the brother-in-law of Frederick and brother of Nathan Bramlett and Marianne, who went on to Kentucky and settled in Illinois, since Reuben Jr., son of Reuben Sr., did not move to the area until 1794). The deed was recorded March 16, 1790.
Frederick’s Revolutionary War Service
   Frederick served as a soldier during the Revolutionary War. Pay records indicate he fought at the Battle of King’s Mountain on Oct. 7, 1780, and at Cowpens on Jan. 17, 1781. “Frederick Burdit” is included as a Revolutionary War soldier in loose papers found in the South Carolina State House in Columbia, S. C., according to “The Revolutionary Rolls,” published by the Secretary of State in The State newspaper on Sunday, Oct. 9, 1904. Frederick’s military service is documented in pay records in South Carolina Archives: Stub entry #390, issued June 16, 1785, indicates South Carolina paid “Three Pounds One Shilling and Five Pence Sterlg,” amounting to “Twenty-one Pounds Ten Shillings” Current Money to “Mr. Frederick Burdit” for “Militia duty before the reduction of Charlestown” (Accounts Audited, p. 912, frames 329-330). Charleston fell on May 12, 1780. The payment was based on Col. Anderson’s return. Stub Entry #39017 in 1785 indicates the militia also paid Frederick three pounds, one shilling sterling (twenty pounds current money) in 1785 “for services at the Battle of King’s Mountain” on Oct. 7, 1780, and for service at Cowpens on Jan. 17, 1781.





Loose papers also indicate one “William Burdet” (possibly Frederick’s brother) served “101 days militia duty...on horseback” in Capt. John Wilson’s Company during Sept. 11, 1779, to June 16, 1780 (The State 1904). Transcripts and copied images of the actual pay stub records, microfilmed by South Carolina Dept. of Archives and History, follows:
State So Carolina Dr. [Deliver/delivered] to William Burdet for 101 days Toward duty from four differ[en]t Pay Bills of Capt. [John] Willson performd alternately from Sept. 11th 1779 untill June 16th 1780 vizt on horseback *38 days -- L38* [plus] 42 do -- 42 [plus] 4 do -- 4 [plus] 17 do -- 17 [Total] 101 days Stlg 14.8.6 3/4 *This 38 Days to Capt. [Hugh] Wardlaw’s Pay Bill.” The transcript of the second page: “[No.] 607 - 31 Decr 1784 Mr. William Burdet his accot. of 101 Days Militia Duty as Private on Horseback on four Bills Pay...[rolls?] of Capt. H. Wardlaw’s performd alternately from Sept. Eleventh to June 16, 1780...101 days...Duty 280. 6 3/4 Fourteen Pounds, Eight shillings & Six Pence three shillings Sterling - Exd. T. W. J. McAgee (SCAR Microcopy 8 Roll 16 Record 911). [Figures written and calculated on the page:] 280.6 3/4 (minus) 20.09.11 1/4 (minus) 12 (equals) 239.
Researchers calculate the birth year of William as circa 1755, which would make him a contemporary of Frederick, who was born in 1753. Although they lived in the same general area of South Carolina, present-day Edgefield and Laurens in Ninety-Six District, it is not known if the two men knew of or were related to each other. This William Burdett married Patience Delacey Hart and later received three land grants in present-day Edgefield County.
   By serving as a soldier in the war, Frederick was eligible to acquire a state land grant in Laurens County in 1786. After the war was over, South Carolina granted free land to officers but for a small fee granted vacant land to volunteer veterans who had served in lower ranks. The latter, who paid for their land, aided the state once again by helping South Carolina acquire funds to pay down the war debt. The majority of the post-Revolutionary War state grants were purchased, and some veterans used pay for their military services to buy their state land grants.
Frederick and Marianne’s land, located on this map slightly south and east of where Marianne’s mother, Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett, and brother Nathan Bramlett lived and where Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church was and still is located. Marianne’s sister or cousin Sarah Bramlett and husband, Nicholas Ware Garrett, and her aunt and uncle Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett had also settled in the area, the latter in 1773. Nicholas Garrett’s land also is designated on the map. He is son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett and brother of William Garrett who married Nancy Bramlett, possibly another sister or cousin of Marianne. Henry Bramlett III, brother of Marianne, may have obtained a post-war land grant in 1792 southwest of the other Bramlett properties in Laurens County and lived there before he relocated his family to Elbert Co., Ga.

Frederick and Marianne Burdette lived near Bramlett Church, shown in top left grid, and close to land owned by her brother Nathan Bramlett and mother, Margaret Bramlett. Frederick’s land, granted Dec. 4, 1786, is farther right, above Beaverdam Creek, south of Enoree River, north of William and Elizabeth Bramblett’s 1773 property. 
Frederick’s Revolutionary War Land Grant
State of South-Carolina, To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: Know Ye, That for and in Consideration of Four Pounds ten Shillings & 2 Pe[nce] Sterling Money, paid by Frederick Burdit into the Treasury for the use of this State, We have granted, and by these Presents do grant unto the said Frederick Burdit Heirs and Assigns, a Plantation or Tract oBf Land, containing One hundred and ninety three Acres Situate in the District of ninety six, on a Branch of Enoree River having such Shape, Form and Marks, as are represented by a Plat hereunto annexed, together with all Woods, Trees, Waters, Watercourses, Profits, Commodities, Appurtenances, and Heriditaments whatsoever thereunto belonging, To have and to hold the said Tract of One hundred and ninety three Acres of Land, and all and singular other the Premises hereby granted unto the said Frederick Burdit his Heirs and Assigns, for ever, in free and common Soccage. Given under the Great Seal of the State. Witness, his Excellency William Moultrie Esquire, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the said State, at Charleston, this fourth Day of December Anno Domini, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty six and in the Eleventh Year of the Independence of the United States of America. William L. M. S. Moultrie And hath thereunto a Plat thereof annexed, representing the same, certified by F. Bremar Surveyor-General. 27th March 1786. (Vol. 13, p. 95)
Property owned by “Frederick Burdett” is mentioned as a landmark on a plat recorded for James Higgins in Laurens Co., S. C., in 1788. Higgins received a land grant for 79 acres on Beaverdam Creek, Enoree River, Ninety-Six Dist., S. C., which was surveyed by James Wofford on Sept. 24, 1788 (SCDAH S213190:23:240:2). Frederick’s 1786 land grant property is mentioned as a landmark in two deeds recorded in 1800 in Laurens County. One deed dated Dec. 17, 1800, when Isaac Lindsay sold 50 acres of land on the Pan Trough Branch of Enoree River to Moses Biter, indicates “Fetherick Burdett” and others owned adjacent land (DB-G:129). The land was also bounded by property owned by Edward Lindsay, James Higgins and Thompson Farley; and the deed indicates it was part of an original grant to Steen, J. (John) Lindsay, Brown and Cannon. William Higgins and Edward Lindsay witnessed the deed, which was recorded Dec. 18, 1800. Frederick and Marianne’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed dated Dec. 18, 1800, when Edward Lindsay and wife, Catey, sold 46 acres of land on the south side of Enoree River to Ezekiel Lindsay (DB-G:515). The land, part of a tract conveyed by John Lindsay to Edward, Isaac and Ezekiel Lindsay, was bounded by property owned by “Fredk. Burdet” and Ephraim Moore and Thompson Farley. Ephraim Moore, Elizabeth Moore and Isaac Lindsay witnessed the deed, which was recorded Nov. 29, 1802 (DB-G:515). “Fredk. Burdett” witnessed a deed in Laurens County on April 23, 1801, when Nathan and Elizabeth Gray Bramlett sold John Burdett 100 acres of land for 25 pounds (DB-O:199). The deed was not recorded until April 6, 1844, after Nathan and Elizabeth had died. The land, located on the south side of the Enoree River, was part of an original grant by Gov. Charles Pinckney to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. In 1801 it was bounded by property owned by Elias Stone, (Amos?) Critchfield and Margaret Bramlett (Marianne’s mother), “along stony ridge.” Samuel Ansley and Zachariah Gray also witnessed the 1801 Bramlett-Burdett deed.
   Frederick was a trustee at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church near Young’s Store northeast of Gray Court, S. C., in 1807. “Fredk. Burdett” was one of three trustee recipients mentioned in a deed written June 2, 1807, when Nathan Bramlett and George Sims granted the trustees and the church “for the sum of five dollars” two acres of land “near Enoree River on Zaks Creek for the purpose of securing a Meeting House thereon, standing and to remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church...” (DB-H:235). ("Zak's" or Zeak's, Ezekiel's, Creek is part of, known as Beaverdam Creek.) The other trustees listed are Joel Fowler and Raughley Stone. Frederick Burdett signed (made his mark on) the deed as recipient; and his son John Burditt and Benjamin Tradewell, a neighbor or possibly relative, witnessed the deed. Frederick’s son John Burditt also signed the deed and agreed to deliver it to his father when it was recorded July 6, 1807, by John Garlington, Register’s Office, of Laurens District.
Frederick and Marianne in Census Data
   Frederick may or may not be the “Frederick Burt,” Free white male of 16 years and upward, who is listed in the First U. S. Census for Ninety-Six (Laurens) Dist., S. C., in 1790. He headed a family that includes four free white females (wife, Marianne, and three daughters Margaret, born 1781; Mary Ann “Molly,” born 1784; and Elizabeth, born 1786) and three free white males under age 16 years (three sons John, born 1776; Henry, born 1778; and Reuben, born 1787). Other children were born after 1790. “Frederick Burdict,” 45 and over, born before 1755, is listed in the 1800 U. S. Census for Laurens Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over, born before 1755 (wife, Marianne); two females 16-26, born 1774-84 (daughters Margaret and Mary Ann “Molly”); a male 16-26, born 1774-84 (nephew? son-in-law?); a female 10-16, born 1784-90 (daughter Elizabeth); a male 10-16, born 1784-90 (son William); a female under 10, born 1790-1800 (daughter Alcey/Ailsey); and one male under 10, born 1790-1800 (son Jesse). Sons John, Henry and Reuben Burdett, married and were living away from home, are listed as heads of their own families in 1800. “Fredrick Burdit,” 45 and over, born in/before 1765, is listed in the 1810 U. S. Census for Laurens Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over (wife, Marianne), and four children: a male 16-26, born 1784-94 (son Jesse or William), and three females 16-26, born 1784-94 (daughters Mary Ann “Molly,” Elizabeth, Alcey/Ailsey) (NARA Film M252:61:88). Frederick is not listed as head of his family in 1820. (Frederick Burtz in 1820 is a different person.) “Fred Burdett,” 70-80, is listed in the 1830 U. S. Census for Laurens Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes a female 70-80 (wife, Marianne) and three grown children: a male 40-50 (son William), a female 30-40 (daughter Mary Ann “Molly”) and a female 15-20 (daughter Alcey/Ailsey) (NARA Film M19:169:275). “Frederick Burdett,” 80-90, is listed in the 1840 U. S. Census for Laurens County as head of a family that includes two females 40-50 (daughters Mary Ann “Molly” and Alcey/Ailsey) and a male 40-50 (son William) (NARA Film M704:513:15).
   An excerpt in South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research indicates “Frederick Burditt” and sons John and Henry as well as several others, including Frederick’s brother-in-law Nathan Bramlett, foreman, and (Frederick’s son-in-law?) Hezekiah Gray, were called to a Laurens District Coroner’s Inquisition on Feb. 6, 1815, to “view the body of Daniel Bragg found dead and drowned in Enoree River” and find out “when where how and after what manner the s’d D. Brag[g] came to his death.” The report, filed two days later in Laurens District Court by Coroner William Irby, indicates Bragg, “in striving to save a negroe man he got drowned” (SCMAR 197). The same panel members were asked to “View the body of a negro man drowned on the plantation of Daniel Bragg” on the same day and report the manner of death. The report, filed two days later in Laurens District, indicated “Negroe George the property of Daniel Brag[g] came to his death...in crossing Enoree River” Feb. 5, 1815, when he “got wash’d off his horse and got drowned” (SCMAR 24-4:198).
Family Bibles
   Inscriptions for Frederick and Marianne and their children were transcribed Feb. 19, 1950, by the late Helen A. (Gossett) Burdette, wife of the late Melvin Louis Burdette Sr., from a small Burdette Bible owned by the late Thomas Oscar Burdette. The inscriptions came from an older Bible. The small Burdette Bible was then, in 1950, in possession of Toy Donald Burdette. Helen shared her 1950 transcript with Franklin Donald Burdette, who contributes the information to this history.
Fredrick Burdett b. Oct. 15 - 1753
Ag. 87 yrs. 3. mons. d. Feb. 10 - 1841
Maryan Burdett b. Sept. 15 - 1752
Ag. 81 yrs. 5 mons. 21 days d. March 8 - 1834
John Burdett b. Feb. 4 - 1776
83 yrs. 1 m. 6 days d. Mar. 11, 1859
Henry Burdett b. Sept. 5 - 1778
74 yrs. 9 m. 8 days d. May 29, 1853
Margret Burdett b. Dec. 3 - 1781
Mary Burdett Rhodes b. May 22 - 1784
83 yrs. 6 m. 23 days d. Nov. 13 - 1867
Reuben Burdett b. Nov. 26 - 1787
75 yrs. 1 m. 12 days d. Jan. 6 - 1862
Elizabeth Burdett Hand b. Sept. 1 - 1786
84 yrs. 8 m. 11 days d. May 12 - 1871
William Burdett b. Jan. 1[8?] - 1790
70 yrs. 16 days d. Feb 3 - 1860
Alcy Burdett b. March 18, 1793
78 yrs. 2 m. 10 days d. May 28, 1871
Jesse Burdett b. Oct. 18 - 1795
(no death date)

Following inscriptions from another larger existing Burdette Bible 
Memoranda
Frederick Burdett was born Oct. 15th 1753 and died Feb. 10th 1841.
Marian Burdett was born Sep. 15th 1752 and died March 8th 1834.
John Burdett was born Feb. 4th 1776 and died March 11th 1859.
Henery Burdett was born Sep. 5th 1778 and died May 29th 1853.
Margaret Burdett was born Dec. 3d 1781.
May (Mary Ann) Burdett was born May 22d 1784 and died Nov 13th 1867.
Reubin Burdett was born Nov. 26th 1787 and died Jan. 18th 1862.
Elizabeth Burdett was born Sep. 1st 1786 and died May 17th 1871.
William Burdett was born Jan. 18th 1790 and died Feb. 3d 1860.
Alcy Burdett was born March 18th 1793 and died May 28th 1871.
Jessee Burdett was born Oct. 18th 1795. (No death date)

Children of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette
   Some of Frederick and Marianne’s nine children may have been named after her parents and siblings and other relatives: John after Marianne’s brother, Henry after Marianne’s father, Henry Bramlett Jr., and her brother Henry Bramlett III and grandfather Henry Sr.; Margaret after Marianne’s mother, Margaret “Peggy” (unknown); and Frederick Reuben in part perhaps after Marianne’s brother Reuben Bramlett who settled in Gallatin Co., Ill. Jesse and Ailsey are given names in the allied Gray family and Jesse is a name used by the family of Marianne’s brother Henry Bramlett III. Mary Ann “Molly” was named after Marianne herself. Two other children--Elizabeth and William--may be named after Marianne’s paternal aunt and uncle or her great-grandfather William Bramlett I/Sr., or after Frederick’s family members.

A later map of the area where Marianne and Frederick’s 193-acre tract is located in Ninety-Six, Laurens Dist., S. C., shows Bramlett Church with neighbors, including Mrs. A. Burdette, Mrs. E. A. Burdette and Rev. Burdettte.

Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette's tombstone in Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis
Private Reuben W. Burditt, Company E, Fourth Battalion, South Carolina Reserves, Confederate States of America, died Oct. 1, 1864, of disease at Charleston, S. C. A direct descendant of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette of Laurens County, he rests in the Confederate Section of historic Magnolia Cemetery at Charleston. Photo by Deborah G. Dennis
Hiram Peterson Burdette, born Dec. 9, 1854, and wife, M. E., born June 19, 1854, buried  in Bramlett Cemetery, Gray Court, S. C.
--

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Benjamin Bramlett
(Possible Son of Margaret and Henry "Harry" Bramlett Jr.)
Benjamin Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., and reportedly their eldest son, according to family tradition, may have been born circa 1751 in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that later became Fauquier County. No evidence has been shared about his birth or death; however, Benjamin reportedly did exist and died on a British prison ship while serving as a soldier or as a civilian patriot during the American Revolution. Family tradition held by some descendants of Henry Bramlett III identify Benjamin as the son of Henry II/Jr. and his death as the cause or reason for Henry II/Jr.’s suicide in 1779 or 1780. Whether or not he married is unknown. No documentation of this sad tradition has been shared, but Benjamin is included in this history in memoriam with a hope that, no longer imprisoned by the enemy’s chains or tortured by the tragedy and fragility of life, his spirit and the anguished soul of his father both rest in eternal peace.
--

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Jalilah "Jaly" Bramlett and John Riley Jr.
(Children: Mary, Nancy, John Charles, Margaret, Nelly, Lewis, Smith, Delitha)
John Riley Jr. served as a Soldier during the American Revolution in Virginia
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Jalilah "Jaly" Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born in 1751 or 1753 in Fauquier Co., Va. She died in Mercer Co., Ky. Her maiden name is provided in a letter to the Fauquier County Clerk by her attorney when she was in the process of applying for a widow's pension based on her husband's Revolutionary War service. Her attorney was seeking a record of her marriage. She married John Riley on Jan. 1, 1771, in Fauquier Co., Va. John was born March 11, 1748, in Virginia, the son of John Riley Sr. John is named in his father John Riley Sr.'s 1791 will in Fauquier County. John served as a soldier during the American Revolution. He is included on the 1792 tax list there. He and Jalilah later moved to Kentucky.

   John Riley wrote his will April 5, 1820, in Mercer Co., Ky., and died a few months later:
In the name of God amen I John Riley of the county of Mercer and state of Kentucky Farmer being in … state of Boddy but of perfect mind & memory thanks be to God calling unto mind the mortality of my body & knowing that is appointed for man once to die do make and ordain this my last will and Testament. that is to say principally & first of all I give & recommend my soul unto hand of almighty God who gave it & my body I recommend to the Earth to be buried in decent Christian form at the discretion of Executors as to … my worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me within this life I give demise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form ... First, I give and bequeath to Jaly Riley my dear and beloved wife during her widowhood all the tract of land whereon I now live together with all my household goods, debts, & moveable effects & after the Expiration of her death my will is that all the property herein above mentioned shall be equally divided amongst my children except Nelly Massey to which I give her one dollar over and above what I have all ready given her. Leonard Harly is to have his mother’s part. Also I do appoint, constitute & ordain William Maddox and Lewis Riley my sole Executors of this my last will & Testament and I do hereby utterly disallow, revoke and disannul all & every other former wills and bequeaths by me in any wise before named, willed & bequeathed, ratifying & confirming this and no other to be my last will and Testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal this fifth day of April in the year of our Lord Eighteen hundred and twenty.
Signed sealed in the presence of
Benjamin B. Rose
James Ellis
Susan (her X mark) Rose
John (his X mark) Riley [seal]
Codicil
Witness I give and bequeath unto Lewis Riley, my son, twenty seven acres & half for his services he has done for me and a equal division with the rest of my children after his mother’s death.
Test: James Ellis
Samuel Conner
John (his X mark) Riley [seal]
The will was probated in October 1820 in Mercer County Court:
The foregoing last will & Testament of John Riley Dec'd was this day produced into court and proved by the oaths of Benjamin B. Rose & James Ellis two subscribing witnesses thereto and the codicil was proven by the oaths of the said James Ellis and ordered to be recorded.
Att. Tho Allin CC
Jalilah and John's eight children: Mary (“Polly”), Nancy, John Charles, Margaret (“Peggy”), Nelly, Lewis, Smith and Delitha Riley. 
--

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Henry Bramlett III and Elizabeth Moss
(Children: Reuben, Margaret, John, Lott, Elizabeth, Emeline Emelia, Nathan, Mary Ann)
Henry Bramlett III served as a Soldier during the American Revolution
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants



South Carolina State Seal and Motto: While I Breathe, I Hope
Henry Bramlett III, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born circa 1755 in Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va. He died around 1828, most likely in Elbert Co., Ga., where he and his family were then living. His burial place is unknown. He married Elizabeth Moss before 1775 in Virginia or South Carolina. She was born circa 1755-1760, perhaps in South Carolina. She died circa 1850 in Elbert or Forsyth Co., Ga. Henry was living in Laurens Co., S. C., by 1776. He served as a soldier during the American Revolution. He returned to Virginia to claim his father's plantation in 1780 after Henry Jr. had died and returned to South Carolina. He sold the property in 1784 to James Dobie/Dobey.

Henry Bramlett III's 1780 plat map of Bramlett Plantation on Elk Marsh Run where he grew up

Henry "Harry" II/Jr.'s former plantation is documented in Virginia Land Office Proprietory Records, VLO entry 117 Box 1.
Henry Bramblett Advertisement, Land Office, Northern Neck of Virginia, Lord Proprietor's Office. To Mr. John Moffett--Whereas Henry Bramblett of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain tract of land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett Father of Henry aforesaid & which said Henry (the Father) died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing and affixing at the Court House at Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett And the said Henry Bramblett desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees, These are therefore to impower you to resurvey the said Land for the Said Henry Bramblett A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin. By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietor's office to me directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblettof South Carolina, a tract of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the property of A Henry Bramblett father to the aforesaid Henry, who dying a suicide the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth Viz Beginning at A a white oak corner to Jonas Williams thence along the said Williams's Line S 31 (degrees) E 60 Poles to B two Hicories thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two small hicories, thence 35 1/2 W 216 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & sundry saplings, thence S 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G two small hicorys in the said Williams's Line, thence along the same to the Beginning Containing 231 Acres. ... J. Moffett 20th Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett} Chain Carriers 
   "Henry Bromlet," white male over 16, is listed in the 1790 Census for Laurens, Ninety-Six Dist., S. C., as head of a family of four females and three males under age 16. Henry III may have obtained a post-war land grant in 1792 southwest of the other Bramlett properties in Laurens County and lived there before he relocated his family to Georgia. Henry III and Elizabeth and family moved from Laurens County where they farmed to settle in Elbert Co., Ga., circa 1800. "Henry Bramblett" of Capt. Dunston Blackwell's District, Elbert Co., Ga., had two draws in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery as as a married man over age 21, a taxpayer and citizen, resident of Georgia during the three years previous to passage of the lottery act, and father of a child or children under age 21. Henry drew land as a Revolutionary War veteran in the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery. His wife, Elizabeth, after he died drew land in the 1832 Georgia Land Lottery as the widow of a Revolutionary War Soldier. (Land Lottery information for Henry, Elizabeth and family in 1806 is documented in Historical Collections of Georgia, Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. III, p. 239.)
   Henry III and Elizabeth's children are Reuben, Margaret, John, Lott, Henry M., Elizabeth, Emeline Emelia ("Milly"), Nathan, Mary Ann Bramblett.
   Reuben Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1775 in Laurens Co., S. C. "Reuben Bramblett" of Capt. Dunston Blackwell's District, Elbert Co., Ga., had two draws in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery, which indicates he was married with a child or children. He married Ailsa "Ailsey" Gray in 1799. Reuben and Ailsey are direct ancestors of Mike Bramblett, administrator of Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center. Reuben and Ailsa's children include Jesse Bramlett who married Mary "Polly" Palmore. Their child is Reuben W. Bramlett, born circa 1827, who married Martha Worley.
   Margaret Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1776 in Laurens Co., S. C. "Margrett Bramblett" of Capt. Dunston Blackwell's District, Elbert Co., Ga., had one draw in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery. Her one draw indicated she was then single. She married William Gober III later in 1806 and moved to Jackson Co., Ga. He was born circa 1765 and died circa 1860.
   John Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1784 in Laurens Co., S. C. "John Bramblett" of Capt. Dunston Blackwell's District, Elbert Co., Ga., had two draws in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery, which indicates he was married with a child or children under age 21.
   Lott Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born before 1785 in Laurens Co., S. C. He and his wife, unknown, lived in Elbert and Franklin Co., Ga. "Lott Bramblett" of Capt. Dunston Blackwell's District, Elbert Co., Ga., had one draw in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery, which indicates he was single and over age 21. One Georgia history indicates he was a minister at Double Branches Baptist Church with a wife in Franklin County. No children for them have been found.
   Henry M. Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1789 in Laurens Co., S. C. He lived in Bradley Co., Tenn., and later died in Texas. He married and had children.
   Elizabeth Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1790 in Laurens Co., S. C.
   Emeline Emelia "Milly" Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1792 in Laurens Co., S. C. She may have died circa 1840. She married John Young Gober. He was born circa 1768 and died circa 1866.
   Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born Sept.. 15, 1794. in Laurens Co., S. C. He died of cholera Aug. 20, 1852, west of Boise, Ida., while traveling west by wagon train on the Oregon Trail. He was buried along the trail. He married Jane "Jenny" "Jinny" Gober. She was born Oct/ 13, 1797. She died Aug. 17, 1852, of cholera west of Boise, Ida., and was buried along the Oregon Trail. Their children include Elizabeth Ann ("Betsy"), Francis Clayton, Henry M., Nancy Jane, George Washington, Martha Lorana, William Henry Bramblett.
   Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" Bramlett, child of Jane "Jenny" "Jinny" Gober and Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramlett, was born circa 1823 and died circa 1854.
   Francis Clayton Bramlett, child of Jane "Jenny" "Jinny" Gober and Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramlett, was born circa 1827 and died 1911. He married Martha Ellen Tower. She was born circa 1844. She died circa 1913. Their children include Nathan Hull, William Henry, Sarah Jane, George Edwin, Mary Nancy, Martha Ellen, Lewis/Louis Francis, Charles David, James Abraham Bramlett.
   Henry M. Bramlett, child of Jane "Jenny" "Jinny" Gober and Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramlett, was born circa 1829.
   Nancy Jane Bramlett, child of Jane "Jenny" "Jinny" Gober and Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramlett, was born circa 1832 and died circa 1853. She married Moses Preston Rice.
   George Washington Bramlett, child of Jane "Jenny" "Jinny" Gober and Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramlett, was born Aug. 12, 1835, in Bradley Co., Tenn. He died April 16, 1910, in Lakeport, Calif. He married Mary Malissa Smith. She was born Dec. 9, 1850. She died Oct. 8, 1910, in Lakeport, Calif. They had several children between 1871-1888, including Abigal Jane, Charles David, Elisa Ellen, John William, Henry Lafayette, Walter, Mary Elizabeth, Emmet Edgar, Ella Ann, Oscar George Bramlet.
   Martha Lorana Bramlett, child of Jane "Jenny" "Jinny" Gober and Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramlett, was born circa 1838 and died circa 1899. She married Ica Foster "Ike" Rice. They had some children.
   William Henry Bramlett, child of Jane "Jenny" "Jinny" Gober and Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramlett, was born circa 1841 and died circa 1893.
   Mary Ann Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1797 in Laurens Co., S. C. She died Feb. 18, 1860, in Cherokee or Forsyth Co., Ga. She married John G. Gober.
--

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Reuben Bramlett and Elizabeth Brown
(Children: Benjamin, Henry, John, Nathan, Coleman Brown, Margaret, Elizabeth)
Reuben Bramlett served as a Soldier during the American Revolution
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants



South Carolina State Seal and Motto: While I Breathe, I Hope
Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis
Reuben Bramlett, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born March 15, 1757, on his parents' plantation in Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va. He died at age 86 on Sept. 11, 1844, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill., at home on his farm and was buried beside his wife, Elizabeth, in her family's Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery. Reuben served three tours of duty as a soldier from Virginia during the American Revolution. His detailed service record is included below. His mother, Margaret "Peggy," was a Patriot who supplied provisions--beef and brandy--to the military; a brother named Benjamin may have perished as a soldier or patriot; his brother Henry III served as a soldier, most likely from South Carolina; and his brother-in-law Frederick Burdette served as a soldier from South Carolina. Other extended family members were also soldiers or patriots of the Revolution. Reuben married Elizabeth Brown circa 1784, most likely in Fauquier County. No marriage record for them has been located: the parish records are lost, and they did not record their union at the county court house, which actually was not a common custom until after the Revolution. Elizabeth was born circa 1760-1765, the child of Mary Coleman and William Brown by family tradition. Elizabeth's full name, Elizabeth Brown, is recorded by Meeks Haley Bramlet in his 1924 history A Pioneer Family - Bramlet. Her mother, Mary Coleman Brown, and some siblings, including Lucy, Coleman, William, John, Francis and Thomas, lived in Kentucky after the war and also settled in Gallatin County between 1813 and 1816 before the Illinois Territory became a state in 1818. Elizabeth died there circa 1830 and was buried in Brown Graveyard, established circa 1814-1816 on her brother Coleman Brown's land on the sad occasion of the death of Elizabeth's daughter-in-law Liddy Stephens Bramlett, first wife of Henry "Harry" Bramlett. The graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery, preceded Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church, which was first constructed in the center of the oldest and highest section of the burial ground. The church later was rebuilt closer to the cemetery entrance. The cemetery and church are now within the city limits of Eldorado. Elizabeth and some of her children were members of Bethel Baptist Church, Wolf Creek and perhaps one other Baptist church in Gallatin County.

Reuben, Elizabeth and many descendants are buried in Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery
Reuben's Life in Virginia
   Reuben and his brothers John and Henry III are named in two surveys for deeds in Virginia relating to their father's former plantation: a survey of Henry III's newly inherited land and a survey of a small parcel of adjoining land for a neighbor, Robert Henson. Reuben, born 1757, was about age 23, and John, born 1764, was about age 16 in 1780.
   A resurvey of their father's former plantation, requested by Henry III after his father’s death, which was recorded in Fauquier County in 1780 with an accompanying plat map, documents Reuben, John and Henry III’s connection to the land, each other and thus to their father, Henry Bramlett Jr. The 1780 resurvey record mentions Reuben and his brother John as chain carriers, their brother Henry III as the current new owner of the land, and their deceased father, “Henry Bramblett,” as the former owner:
Northern Neck of Virginia. Lord Proprietor’s Office.To Mr. John Moffett--Whereas Henry Bramblett [III] of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain Tract of Land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by Estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett [Jr.], Father of Henry [III] aforesaid, which said Henry (the Father) [Jr.] died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing & affixing at the Court House of Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no Person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett [III]. And the said Henry Bramblett [III] desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees. These are therefore to empower you to resurvey the said Land for the said Henry Bramblett [III] A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin
Plat Map of Henry Bramblett’s [III] Land Area 231 Acres By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietors office to me Directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblett [III], of South Carolina, a tract of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the Property of A Henry Bramblett [Jr.] father to the aforesaid Henry [III]; who dying a suicide, the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at a white oak corner to Jonas Williams, thence along the said Williams’s Line, S 31 E 60 Poles to B two Hicories, thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two Small hicories, thence N 35 1/2 W 21 6 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & Sundry saplings, thence S 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G 2 small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning. Containing 231 Acres. J. Moffitt 20th Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett Chain Carriers
The above record is the only official documentation found for the biological connection between brothers John, Reuben and Henry III and their father, Henry Jr. Close family members or neighbors traditionally participated as chain carriers in land surveys since they knew boundaries best and were in a position to protect the landowner’s (their relative’s or neighbor’s) interests. The original 1735 Bramlett-Ambrose deed for Henry Sr. lists the property as 250 acres more or less, but the new deed and plat map from the official resurvey for his grandson Henry III contains only 231 acres.

Reuben and John also are named Nov. 1, 1780, in Fauquier Co., Va., as chain carriers for their neighbor John Henson's survey of 12 1/2 acres of waste or vacant land adjacent to their father's former Bramlett plantation. Henson had earlier obtained a warrant to survey the land on Nov. 8, 1779:
Northern Neck of Virginia Lord Proprietor's Office No. 961. To Mr. John Moffett whereas Robert Henson of Fauquier County hath informed that there are about Four Hundred acres of waste land and ungranted Land adjoining Jennings, Bramlet & Dodd near the Head of Ratcliff Run in the said County. And desiring a Warrant to Survey the same in order to Obtain a Deed being ready to pay the composition and Office Fees -- these are therefore to empower you to Survey the said waste and ungranted Land for the said Robt. Henson Paying due regard to your instructions a Plot of which Survey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 8th Day of May next given under my Hand and the Office Seal the 8th Day of November 1779. B. Martin.
The survey for 12 1/2 acres of the above mentioned land includes a small plat map that also contains a reference to "B" (Henry) "Bramblett's Land," which is adjacent the the surveyed acreage, as well as land owned by Jennings at "C" and Dodd at "D" "E" and "F":
By Virtue of a warrant from the Proprietors Office, to me directed I have Surveyed for Robert Hinson of Fauquier County, a Tract of Waste Land, adjoining the Lands of Jennings, Bramblett, & Dodd near the head of Ratcliff's Branch, in the said County, Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at A a white Oak & Black Oak by a glade corner to Bramblett, thence along the said Bramblett's Line S 49 (degrees) E 132 Poles to B two small hicories in Jennings's line, thence along the said Line - S 61 (degrees) W 20 Poles to C a hicory sapling, thence N 30 (degrees) W 3 Poles to D a hicory of fallen Red Oak Corner to Dodd, thence binding along the said Dodd's Lines N 47 (degrees) W 66 Poles to E a Large Hicory stump & small white Oak by the road, thence N 42 (degrees) W 59 1/2 Poles to F a box Oak by the said Road, thence N 37 (degrees) E 9 Poles to the Beginning, Containing 12 1/2 acres ... J. Moffett 1st Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett} Chain Carriers
This survey, recorded in the Land Office of the Northern Neck of Virginia Proprietary, 1725-1792, VLO Entry 117, Box 2, documents the residence of Reuben and John at home in Fauquier County on Nov. 1, 1780. The previous resurvey record quoted in this text above for Henry Bramlett III, which also names Reuben and John as chain carriers, documents their residence on Nov. 20, 1780. Reuben used his 1780 surveying experiences in Virginia later when he was asked to survey a road while living in Kentucky between 1805-1814.
Reuben and Elizabeth's Life in South Carolina
   Reuben and Elizabeth moved their family from Virginia to Laurens Co., S. C., by 1787 when their son Henry "Harry" Bramlett was born. Their son John also was born there, and son Nathan was born there in 1799. Reuben bought 100 acres of land on Durbin's Creek, branch of Enoree River, from William Brown, perhaps his father-in-law or brother-in-law. He then sold the land to Benjamin Brown, perhaps his brother-in-law, for 30 pounds on Feb. 22, 1798 (DB-F:328). The land was part of Frazier's grant, first conveyed to James Frazier, then to William Brown, then to the said Reuben Bramlett. It bounded on land owned by Francis Allison, John Deen, William Gilbert Jr. The deed was witnessed by Joseph Line and William Gilbert. Reuben bought other land from John Robinson and farmed in Laurens County until he sold it to William Brown on Sept. 2, 1800. (William Brown is most likely a close relative of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett, perhaps her father or brother?) The tract of land originally was granted to John Robinson on Aug. 10, 1797, and conveyed to Reuben Bramlett (Son of Henry II/Jr. and Margaret). Lewis Allison and Reuben's brother "Nathan Bramblett" witnessed the 1800 deed. All were from Laurens County. (John Robinson/Robertson is husband of Martha Mary "Polly" Bramblett, sister of Mildred "Milley" Bramblett who married Menoah Robertson and sister of Reuben Bramblett Jr., who reported on his Revolutionary War pension application that he moved to Laurens County in 1794. The three siblings' father, Reuben Bramblett Sr., named them in his 1806 will as residents of South Carolina.) Reuben sold the land he had purchased in 1798 in 1800 as he and Elizabeth and family were preparing to move to Christian Co., Ky. Reuben begins to appear in tax records there in 1801.
Reuben and Elizabeth's Life in Kentucky
   Reuben and Elizabeth bought land from John Reeves and farmed it for about seventeen years before selling the property back to Reeves in 1818. Reuben paid taxes on the farm in 1802 for the year 1801 and in 1819 for the year 1818. "Reuben Bramblet" witnessed the will of John Brown, most likely a close relative of Elizabeth, in Christian County: "The last will and testament produced in Court of John Brown by William Brown one of the Executors therein named sworn to by Reuben Bramblet a subscribing witness thereto and ordered to certify." The record appears between Oct. 14, 1805, and 1808 in Christian County Court Order Book B, page 256.
   "Reuben Bramlet" and son "Benjamin Bramlet" and three others are referenced in a Christian Co., Ky., court record to survey a road and report on it:
On the motion of Abram Morris it is ordered that Mathias Earley, Ezekiel Dunning, Reuben Bramlet, Benjamin Bramlet, and Reubin Cook or any three of them after being first sworn to be appointed viewers to view and mark a road from Earley's Horse Mill to the Caldwell County line where the road that leads from Hopkinsville to Eddyville crosses said line and report.
The record appears between Oct. 14, 1805, and May 2, 1814, in Christian County Court Order Book B, page 332. Reuben's son Henry Bramlett also is referenced in a later Christian Co., Ky., court record: "It is ordered that Henry Bramlett take into his care charge and custody Patsy Williams and infant orphan of ___ Williams deceased for the ensuing twelve months and that he receive therefore $30 to be laid off in the next levy." The record appears in Christian Co., Ky., Court Order Book C, page 11. The relationship between Henry and the Williams family members is unknown.
Reuben's Revolutionary War Service

Son of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr.

Reuben Bramlett of Fauquier County, Virginia and Gallatin/Saline County, Illinois:
Revolutionary War Service

By Deborah G. Dennis
(This article first appeared on http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/)
Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, served three tours of duty as a private from Virginia during the Revolutionary War in 1777-1781. His pension claim is documented in National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, D. C. His pension number is S.30896, and his pension certificate bears the number 7814. (His surname is spelled Bramblet, Bramlett and Bramlet in various pension documents, census data and estate records.) He is sometimes confused by family researchers with two other contemporary men named Reuben Bramlett/Bramblett--his paternal first cousins--who were associated with the war or other military action in Virginia and South Carolina or Georgia, respectively. Census data indicate that long after the Revolutionary War these other two men lived separately in South Carolina and Georgia during 1818-1840 while the subject of this biographical sketch, their first cousin Reuben, lived in Gallatin (now Saline) County, Illinois.1
   Reuben’s pension claim provides the exact date and place of his birth--March 15, 1757, in Fauquier County, Virginia, as well as detailed information about his war service. (He actually was born in Prince William County before land boundaries changed and that area became Fauquier County when it was created two years later in 1759.) Additional biographical information is provided in a court document filed after Reuben died on September 11, 1844, in Gallatin County, Illinois. His seven children filed a survivors’ application for a final payment of his military pension there on March 21, 1845.2 The record names all seven children and indicates that, at the time of his death, Reuben had lived in Gallatin County, Illinois, for twenty-six years since moving in 1818 from Christian County, Kentucky.
   A legal brief filed by W. R. Turner with Reuben Bramlett’s pension application indicates “Reuben Bramblet, County of Gallatin, in the State of Illinois” made his declaration of Revolutionary War service before a court in Gallatin County, Illinois, when he was 75 years old. His service was documented by the court with records from the war department and with “traditionary evidence” given in court by Reuben Bramlett and by a clergyman and a neighbor who both stated Reuben was well known as a veteran of the Revolution in the neighborhood where he lived.
A Summary of Reuben Bramlett’s War Service
  Reuben Bramlett served as a private in the Virginia Line with General George Washington in Virginia and under Col. Williamson in South Carolina. Reuben first enlisted in the militia in Fauquier County, Virginia, in September 1777 and served three months as a private in Captain Samuel Blackwell’s Company in Colonel Armistead Churchill and Major Francis Triplett’s Regiment. Reuben said he marched with his unit through Maryland to Pennsylvania where they joined General George Washington’s army and were attached to the Third Virginia Regiment. He enlisted again in the spring of 1778 or 1779 in Fauquier County, Virginia, as a private and served three months in South Carolina in Captain William Berry’s Company in Colonel Williamson’s Regiment. While stationed at a fort on the Indian Line in northwest South Carolina, Reuben and two other soldiers were taken prisoner there by Tories commanded by Captain or Colonel Boyd when their officers and the other troops were out ranging. Reuben and the others were later released and left unharmed when the enemy took supplies and left the fort. After his discharge Reuben returned to Fauquier County and later enlisted there as a private for a third time in June 1781. He served three months under Captain William Triplett in Major/Colonel Francis Triplett's Regiment in the Fauquier Militia before being honorably discharged in 1781 before Lord Cornwallis and the British surrendered at Yorktown. He applied for and received a pension based on his military service in 1832 while living in Illinois.
Reuben Bramlett’s Court Deposition
Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of congress passed June 7th 1832
State of Illinois}
Gallatin County}
On this 5th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the Hon. Thomas C. Browne Judge of the Circuit Court for the county aforesaid now sitting--Reuben Bramblet a resident of said county in the state of Illinois aged 75 years on the 15th day of Last March who being duly sworn according to Law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7, 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated. He first volunteered under Capt. Samuel Blackwell of Fauquier County Virginia for the Term of three months in what year exactly he does not recollect but it was the same year of the Battle of Brandywine for he recollects that while out and just after he had joined his Corps he was marched by the Battle ground to join Genl. Washington’s army with whom he remained until his three months had expired. He is pretty sure he volunteered in September of that year. The Col[onel] of the regiment that he started with was of the name of Armstead Churchill but he did not command them long, but went back on the march and the regiment was then conducted to Head Quarters by Maj. Francis Triplet. There was two companies--one commanded by Capt. Harrison (Benjamin he thinks) and the other by Capt. Blackwell. They marched from Fauquier County through Maryland to Pennsylvania where they joined the army under Genl. Washington not more than 15 miles from Brandywine river. After his arrival at Head Quarters they joined the 3d Virginia Regiment. He remembers a Col. Ennis but whether he commanded the 3d Reg[imen]t or not he does not know. He turned out under him to fight the Hessians who had landed on this side of the Schuyeskill but they run and no fight took place. He was discharged at the same place where he joined the army at the end of his 3 months. He volunteered a second time for three months a year or two afterward in the spring of the year under Capt. William Berry to go into South Carolina on the Indian line where he was stationed under Col. Williamson several companies at different places. Col. Williamson commanded them all but was not much with his company which was stationed at a Block House. Their march had been by Orange Court house, Guilford Courthouse, Sal[i]sbury, across Broad river, Catawba river & Inaree [Enoree] river where his time was all but out and Capt. Berry & the whole company, but three, were absent rangeing. Those three of whom this applicant was one were taken prisoners by several hundred Tories under the command of Capt. or Col. Boyd who was proceeding to join the British. He was not taken away but the Tories after taking what they wanted went on & left him & his comrades at the fort & when Capt. Berry returned from his rangeing expedition he was discharged his second Tour of three months being expired. he was in no battle during this Tour nor served with any Continental regiment or company.
We, Wilson Henderson a clergyman residing in the County of Gallatin state of Illinois and William Sutton, residing in the same hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Reuben Bramblet who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration. That we believe him to be 75 years of age that he is reputed in the neighborhood where he lives to have been a soldier in the revolution & that we concur in that opinion.
Sworn & subscribed the day and year aforesaid} Wilson Henderson Wm Sutton Leod. White cl[er]k
And the said court do hereby Declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department that the above named applicant served as he states and the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Wilson Henderson who has signed the preceding certificate is a clergyman resident in the County of Gallatin aforesaid and that William Sutton who has also signed the same is a resident in the same County and is a credible person and that their statement is entitled to credit.
I Leonard White Clerk of the Circuit Court in afor[e] Said County do hereby certify that the foregoing contains the original proceedings of the said Court in the matter of the application of Reuben Bramblet for a pension.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal of office this 5 day of September 1832 Leod. White cl[er]k4
He volunteered for a third term of three months the same year that Cornwallis was taken under Capt. William Triplett son of Maj. Francis Triplett before named. He entered the service this time in the month of June at Fauquier County Virginia and marched through Falmouth and Fredricksburgh to Little York where he joined the main army. He does not remember what regiment he was attached to on this occasion nor the names of his colonel or major, but recollects to have seen there Genl. Wayne and to have been commanded by him--was in no battle being discharged & returned home before the surrender of Cornwallis his three months being out & heard of the surrender of Cornwallis a few weeks after his return.
Certificate of Pension
   “Reuben Bramblet of Gallatin in the State of Illinois who was a private in the company commanded by Captain Black[well] of the Regt. commanded by Col. Armstead [Churchill] in the Va. line for nine months” was inscribed on the Illinois Pension Roll in 1833. His pension amounted to “30 Dollars 00 Cents per annum, to commence on the 4th day of March 1831.” The certificate of pension was issued on April 6, 1833, and sent to Henry Eddy, of Shawneetown, Illinois, who paid Reuben $75. William R. Palmer, Clerk of the Gallatin County Commissioner’s Court, recorded the payment document in Book E, Volume 8, page 55.
Reuben’s Survivors’ Application for Final Pension Payment
   Reuben died intestate at age 86 on September 11, 1844, in Gallatin County, Illinois. His youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlet, administered his estate, which was divided between all of his legal heirs, and recorded at the county courthouse. His seven children filed their survivors’ application for a final payment of his military pension on March 21, 1845:
State of Illinois}
Gallatin County}
Be it known that before me, James Murray, a Justice of the Peace, in and for the said county, personally appeared Benjamin Bramlett, Henry Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett, Coleman B. Bramlett, John Bramlett, Margaret Easley, & Elizabeth Baker, and made oath in due form of law that they are the children of Reuben Bramlet, deceased, who was the identical person who was a pensioner and is now dead, and to whom a certificate of pension was issued which is herewith surrendered. That the deceased pensioner resided in Gallatin County with his children for the space of twenty six years before his death, and that previously thereto he resided in Christian County in the State of Kentucky. Sworn to and Subscribed before me this 21st day of March, 1845 James Murray, Justice of the Peace [Signed] Benjamin Bramlet 4 Henry Bramlet John Bramlet Nathan Bramlet Coleman B. Bramlet Margaret Easley Elizabeth Baker
Two witnesses who write} John M. Burnett Joseph Easley Know all men by these presents that we, Benjamin Bramlett, Henry Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett, Coleman B. Bramlett, John Bramlett, Margaret Easley, & Elizabeth Baker, of the County of Gallatin, State of Illinois, the children of Reuben Bramlett, deceased, who was a pensioner of the United States, do hereby constitute and appoint Erastus Wright our true and lawful attorney for us and in our names to receive from the agent of the United States for paying pensions in the State of Illinois the balance of said pension from the 4th day of March, 1844, to the 11th day of September, 1844, being the day of his death. Witness our hands and seals this 21st day of March, 1845 Benjamin Bramlet Henry Bramlet John Bramlet Nathan Bramlet Coleman B. Bramlet Margaret Easley Elizabeth Baker
Two witnesses who write} John M. Burnett Joseph Easley

Final Pension Payment Vouchers, showing Reuben's death date, courtesy National Archives and Records Administration
   Michael Hillegas Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution at one time placed a copper marker on Reuben Bramlett’s grave in the oldest section of Wolf Creek Cemetery, Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill. Elder descendants in the area designated the grave’s location for the group from personal knowledge. The copper marker and its placement was not mapped or documented; and some time later the copper marker was removed, disappeared. Graves for Reuben and Elizabeth are now marked with an inscribed companion stone acquired by Deborah G. Dennis and late husband, Gary Michael Dennis, from the U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs and installed in the old section of the cemetery next to the marked graves of their daughter Margaret and her husband, Joseph Easley, and the unmarked graves of some of their family members.

Reuben Bramlett’s name is inscribed with others on a monument honoring Revolutionary War veterans buried in Saline County. The monument was first placed on the courthouse lawn there in Harrisburg by Michael Hillegas Chapter D.A.R. and unveiled on Oct. 11, 1931. It was later moved to its current position in Sunset Lawn Cemetery in Harrisburg. The copper plaque inscription: "TO REUBEN BRAMLET, MALACHI HEREFORD, THOMAS HAMILTON, LEWIS HANCOCK AND WILLIAM ROARK, SOLDIERS OF THE REVOLUTION, BURIED IN SALINE COUNTY." The monument was unveiled on the courthouse lawn at Harrisburg under auspices of the Michael Hillegas Chapter of the D. A. R. Mr. A. J. Cook and Mrs. Carl Rude unveiled the monument and the Rev. T. Leo Dodd and Mrs. David Peffer of Aurora, Illinois, State Regent, spoke at the ceremony.
End Notes
1 Reuben Bramlett of Gallatin County, Illinois, is the son of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr. and grandson of Henry Bramlett Sr. of Fauquier County, Virginia. Two of his first cousins who share his given name were associated with the Revolutionary War in Virginia and South Carolina: 1) Reuben Bramblett Jr., the son of Reuben and Margaret Bramblett of Virginia and Bourbon County, Kentucky, who served in Elias Edmonds’ Company of the First Virginia Regiment of Artillery commanded by Colonel Thomas Marshall as a paid teamster in Virginia and later filed a pension application (R.1152) in South Carolina in 1832 that was twice rejected, and 2) Reuben Bramblett, the son of William and Elizabeth Bramblett of Virginia and Laurens County, South Carolina, whose Revolutionary War service is suggested in a reference to him as a military pensioner in the 1840 U. S. Census for Gwinnett County, Georgia. No record of Revolutionary War service has been found for him. Reuben Jr. (1) moved from Fauquier County, Virginia, to Laurens County, South Carolina, in 1794 and lived there until he died after 1840. His cousin Reuben (2) moved from Laurens County, South Carolina, to Gwinnett County, Georgia, circa 1820 and lived there until he died after 1840. Their cousin Reuben, the pensioner whose service is documented and featured here, moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to Gallatin (now Saline) County, Illinois, in 1818 and lived there until he died in 1844.
2 Reuben and Elizabeth (Brown) Bramlett and children all moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to Gallatin County, Illinois. Elizabeth, who died circa 1830 in Gallatin County, is the daughter of Mary Coleman and William Brown, according to family tradition. Elizabeth and Reuben’s marriage in Virginia circa 1783-1785 has not been documented due to lost parish records. Elizabeth’s mother and siblings also moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to Gallatin County, Illinois. (Her brother Coleman Brown was in the territory as early as 1816 and bought land built a blockhouse with brothers there on the site of present-day Eldorado.) Elizabeth and Reuben may have moved from Virginia into Tennessee before or after moving by 1787 to South Carolina where several of his relatives had relocated before and after the Revolution. (The 1850 census indicates his son Henry was born in South Carolina in 1787 and his son Nathan was born there in 1799.) Tax records show Reuben later owned a farm in Kentucky for several years, between 1802 and 1818, before he moved his family to Illinois. Elizabeth predeceased Reuben: She is not enumerated in the 1840 census, nor mentioned in Reuben's pension application and estate records. Their seven children, who are named in Reuben’s pension and 1844-1847 estate records in Gallatin County, are 1) Benjamin Bramlett, who married his cousin Mary “Polly” Brown in Kentucky and died in 1830 (most likely buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery); 2) Henry Bramlett, who first married Liddy Stephens (first person buried in Brown Family Graveyard on Coleman Brown’s land, now Wolf Creek Cemetery, in present-day Eldorado, Illinois) and second married Malinda Easley (buried beside Henry with markers in Bramlet Cemetery), and died in 1865; 3) John Bramlett who most likely did not marry and died after 1847; 4) Nathan Bramlett who married Mary “Polly” Upchurch in Illinois in 1820 and died in 1858; 5) Coleman Brown Bramlet who married Susannah Upchurch in Illinois and died in 1889 (both buried with markers Bramlet Cemetery); 6) Margaret Bramlett who married Joseph Easley in Christian County, Kentucky, (both buried with markers in Wolf Creek Cemetery); and 7) Elizabeth Bramletwho married Elijah Baker in Gallatin County in 1829 (deaths and burial places unknown).
3 Benjamin Bramlett did not actually, physically appear in court as stated since he was already deceased. He died of measles circa 1830 and definitely before his father's estate was probated in Gallatin County in 1844-1847: Ben's name, signed by his brother Henry with the same handwriting used for Henry's own name, is included in the court record since Ben was a child/heir of Reuben. Benjamin’s children are named in their grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s probate records as recipients of their father Benjamin’s share of his father Reuben’s estate because Ben had already died.
4 Transcript of pension declaration is taken from three copies ordered from NARA. Each had different blurred, illegible and legible sections, allowing a full transcript.
Author’s Note: Deborah G. Dennis is a fifth-great-granddaughter of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, descending through their son Coleman Brown Bramlet and his wife, Susannah Upchurch and their son Thomas Brown Bramlett and wife, Rebecca Jane Hanley. Deb also is a fifth-great-granddaughter of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett's brother Coleman Brown, descending through his son Marvel Brown and wife, Paletire Ellis Cox, and their daughter Susan Brown and husband, Montgomery Miner, and their daughter Mary Matilda Miner who married her cousin Henry Coleman Bramlett. Henry Coleman Bramlett is son of Thomas Brown Bramlett and grandson of Coleman Brown Bramlet and great-grandson of Reuben Bramlett and Elizabeth Brown. Deb is a native of Illinois who now lives in Charleston, S. C. For more information, contact debdenn@gmail.com.

Reuben and Elizabeth's Life in Illinois
   Reuben is listed in Gallatin County census data during 1820-1840. “Reuben Bramlett,” 82, resident of Gallatin County, Illinois, and head of his family on June 1, 1840, is listed in the 1841 Census of Pensioners, created from the 1840 U. S. Census for Gallatin County, Illinois.
Reuben's Estate
   Reuben's probate records, naming seven children in receipts for their shares of his estate, and containing an appraisement bill of his personal estate and payment receipts, indicate he was well invested in family and farm. He owned vital necessities at the end of his life: oven and pot hooks, coffee mill, large kettle; a cow for milk and butter, hogs, steers, two horses with one saddle. He owned one plough, used by him and later, sons, to cultivate his land. His youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlet administered the estate since Reuben died intestate at his home in Raleigh Township.
"Illinois, Wills and Probate Records, 1772-1999”
1844-1847 Gallatin Co., Ill., Box 6-B
H. R. Coffee's Bill "For 1 Coffin --- $6.00" in September 1844 provides proof Reuben died and was prepared for burial in Gallatin Co., Ill. He and wife, Elizabeth Brown, rest in old Brown Family Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery
Reuben and Elizabeth's Children
   Elizabeth and Reuben's first child, Benjamin, was born in Virginia in 1785, according to a published historical account in Galatiin/Saline County, quoted below. They moved to Laurens Co., S. C., before their son Henry was born in 1787 and son Nathan was born in 1799. Their son John may have been born there as well between 1788 and 1797 before Reuben and Elizabeth moved the family to Kentucky. They began farming in Christian Co., Ky., in 1800-1801. Bible records indicate their youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlett, was born in Kentucky in 1802. Their two daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth, were born in Kentucky as well. The entire family moved by 1818 into southern Illinois where they established Bramlett Settlement, a community of individual family farms south of Raleigh and west of Eldorado that eventually included a rural school, cemetery and church.


   Benjamin Bramlett, first child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born Aug. 29, 1785, in Virginia, most likely Fauquier County. He died circa 1830 of measles in Saline Co., Ill., and was most likely buried at Brown Graveyard/Wolf Creek Cemetery. Benjamin purchased 80 acres of land in section 9, township 8 south, range 7 east, Gallatin County, for $100 on Jan. 12, 1824. He married Mary "Polly" Brown circa 1812 in Christian Co., Ky. She was born circa 1790-94 in Kentucky, the daughter of Nancy Wilhoit/Wilhite and Coleman Brown. She died circa 1824-26 in Gallatin County and most likely was buried at Wolf Creek. Their son's name and the names of their daughters' husbands are listed as heirs of their grandfather Reuben Bramlett's estate in his 1844-1847 probate records: Eliza, Clarinda, Nancy M., Elizabeth "Betsy" and Alfred J. Bramlet.

   Eliza Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born April 13, 1813, in Christian Co., Ky. She died Aug. 7, 1885, in Hamilton Co., Ill. She married Joseph Choisser on April 4, 1839, in Gallatin (now Saline) County. He was born July 7, 1814, in Kentucky and died July 16, 1851, in New Orleans, La. He signed the receipt on Nov. 29, 1847, for his wife's share of her grandfather Reuben Bramlett's estate. Their children are Joseph Jr. born and died 1840 and William Parish Choisser born Sept. 3, 1843, and died Oct. 12, 1845. Eliza second married James A. Twigg on Dec. 16, 1852, in Saline County. He was Aug. 31, 1804, in Tennessee. He died at age 91 on March 31, 1896, in Hamilton Co., Ill., and was buried at Hickory Hill Cemetery, Walpole, Ill. James first married Polly Barker, born 1805, died 1843; and their child is Polly Twigg Hall.


   Clarinda Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born April l1, 1820, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She died Nov. 8, 1847, in Saline Co., Ill. She married William George Burnett on Feb. 23, 1840, in Saline County. He was born there Sept. 21, 1819, the son of Sarah Burnett Graham and William George Burnett Sr. He died there April 11, 1849. He signed the receipt on Nov. 29, 1847, for his wife's share of her grandfather Reuben Bramlett's estate.
  
   Nancy M. Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born Sept. 26, 1821, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She died Oct. 17, 1899, at Rural Broughton, Hamilton Co., Ill., and was buried there in Old Hickory Hill Cemetery. She married John Henry Irvin on Feb. 7, 1840, in Gallatin (now Saline) County. He signed the receipt on Nov. 29, 1847, for his wife's share of her grandfather Reuben Bramlett's estate. He was born Feb. 10, 1821, in Hamilton County. He died Nov. 22, 1864.
   Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born circa 1822 in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She died there circa 1872. She married Andrew H. Benson on March 25, 1841, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He signed the receipt on Nov. 29, 1847, for his wife's share of her grandfather Reuben Bramlett's 1844-1847 estate. Andrew was born circa 1823, the son of Mary B. "Polly" Riggin and Charles Robbins Benson. He died Jan. 29, 1901, in Gallatin Co., Ill. "Elizabeth Benson," no age (29), and husband, Andrew H. Benson, 28, farmer, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Curran Twp., Saline Co., Ill., with two children, all born Illinois: William E. F., and Eliza J., no age (NARA Film M432:127:63A). "Elizabeth E. Benson," 39, and husband, A. H., 38, Baptist preacher, $1,100 real estate, $560 personal estate, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Twp. 8 Range 7 East, Saline Co., Ill., with four children: Wm. F., 12, farmer; Eliza J., 12; Rebecca A., 6; Charles A., 2 (NARA Film M653:223:861).Andrew and Elizabeth's children are William E. F., Eliza Jane, Rebecca Anna, Charles Andrew, Frances and Amanda Ellen Benson.
   William E. F. Benson, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born circa 1844. He died March 25, 1879.
   Eliza Jane Benson, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born in Saline Co., Ill.
   Rebecca Anna Benson, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born in Saline Co., Ill.
   Charles Andrew Benson, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born in Saline Co., Ill.
   Frances Benson, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born in Saline Co., Ill.
   Amanda Ellen Benson, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born in Saline Co., Ill.
   Alfred J. Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born March 11, 1824, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died Feb. 12, 1887, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. "Alford J. Bramlet" signed (made his mark on) the receipt Nov. 29, 1847, for his share of his grandfather Reuben Bramlett's estate. He married Emeline A. Herrin/g. She was born Nov. 9, 1829, in Kentucky, the daughter of Nancy Renshaw and Heli Herring. Emeline died Feb. 12, 1887, and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. Their children are Nancy Elizabeth, George Ewing, Hetty E. and Charles Alfred Bramlet.
   Nancy Elizabeth Bramlet, child of Emeline A. Herrin/g and Alfred J. Bramlet, was born 1856 in Saline Co., Ill. She died May 10, 1933, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Alton, Madison Co., Ill. She married Richard Damascus Swain.
   George Ewing Bramlett, child of Emeline A. Herrin/g and Alfred J. Bramlet, was born July 27, 1860, in Saline Co., Ill. He died Oct. 27, 1946. He married Emma Sisk. They rest in Wolf Creek Cemetery. Their children are Bernice, Henry Alfred, Verbyl E. Bramlett.   Hetty E. Bramlett, child of Emeline A. Herrin/g and Alfred J. Bramlet, was born circa 1865 in Saline Co., Ill.
   Charles Alfred Bramlett, child of Emeline A. Herrin/g and Alfred J. Bramlet, was born Feb. 3, 1868 in Saline Co., Ill. He died Nov. 17, 1933, and was buried at Wesley Chapel Cemetery. He married Sarah Cordelia Pickens.

Tombstone of Henry "Harry" Bramlett and second wife, Malinda Easley, Bramlet Cemetery,
original image by Deborah G. Dennis
   Henry "Harry" Bramlett, second child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born circa 1787 in Laurens Co., S. C. He died June 21, 1865, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Henry signed receipts for his share of his father's estate and a receipt for a payment he received from his younger brother Coleman Brown Bramlet, administrator, for brother "John Bramlet the sum of fifteen dollars for trouble and guarding" their mentally disabled brother. The receipts prove Henry was the son of Reuben Bramlett and brother of Coleman Brown Bramlet.
Henry Bramlett's receipt in his father's estate records
   Henry first married Liddy Stephens on Jan. 2, 1812, in Christian Co., Ky. The marriage was recorded in both Christian and Caldwell County. Liddy was born circa 1788 in Kentucky or North Carolina. She died in the Illinois Territory circa 1814-1816 and was the first person buried in Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery. They did not have children who survived. Henry, in the area to assist with security and building his maternal uncle Coleman Brown's Blockhouse, returned to Kentucky and second married Malinda Easley on Dec. 30, 1817, in Christian County. Henry and Malinda settled in 1818 in Gallatin Co., Ill., and participated in the establishment of Bramlett Settlement by farming with his father and brothers. Malinda, born in 1798 in Stokes Co., N. C., is the daughter of Lucy and Warham Easley and sister of Joseph Easley, husband of Henry's sister Margaret "Peggy" Bramlett. Malinda died Jan. 15, 1855, in Saline County and was buried there in Bramlet Cemetery. "Henry Bramlet," 62, born South Carolina, farmer, $650 real estate, and wife, Malinda, 52, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill., with five grown and minor children born Illinois: Reuben, 21, laborer; Benjamin, 18, laborer; Joseph, 16, laborer; William, 14; Warham, 12 (NARA Film M432:127:53A). "Henry Bramlet," 70, born South Carolina, $1,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, widowed, is listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Twp. 8 Range 6 East, Saline Co., Ill., living with son Allen, 35, farmer, $225 personal estate, and wife, Melinda, 25, domestic, and children: John H., 12, and Harriet E., 1, all born Illinois (NARA Film M653:223:912).
   Henry and Malinda's descendants lived in, worked and participated as active members of the Bramlet Community. Some signed the petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association in 1918 and served as trustees. Some of Henry and Malinda's descendants are contemporary members of Union Grove Baptist Church. In recent years they refurbished the church and added beautiful, brightly colored stained glass windows. Henry and Malinda's children include Jemima, Emaline ("Emily"), Nancy Jane, Henry Allen, Reuben Henry, Benjamin, Joseph, William Henry and Warham Bramlett.
   Jemima Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She married Martin Gillett.
   Emaline "Emily" Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She married Hiram George Burnett.
   Nancy Jane Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She married Robert Boyd on Jan. 4. 1847, in Gallatin Co., Ill.


   Henry Allen Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill.
  
   Reuben Henry Bramlet, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born Aug. 10, 1829, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died at age 62 years, 10 months, 17 days, on June 27, 1892, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery near Eldorado, Ill. His tombstone is inscribed "The Lord is in His holy Temple. Prepare to meet Him in Peace." He married Mary Read McCoy on Nov. 10, 1853, in Saline County. She was born Feb. 13, 1836, in Ohio, the daughter of Nolene Hulda McFarland and Daniel John McCoy. She died Nov. 9, 1922, in Evansville, Ind. Mary and Reuben's children are Huldah M. and Rufus Henry Bramlet.

   Huldah M. Bramlet, child of Reuben Henry and Mary Read McCoy Bramlet, was born Jan. 22, 1855, in Saline Co., Ill. She died there Feb. 19, 1897, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Her tombstone is inscribed "Remember Me For I Am At Rest." Huldah married Willis W. Kilgore on March 31, 1881, in Eldorado, Ill. Willis, son of Naomi Tison and J. L. Kilgore, was born in Saline County. He died Nov. 9, 1924, in Harrisburg, Ill. Two of their children are buried at Bramlet: Mary and Margaret Emily Kilgore.


   Rufus Henry Bramlet, child of Reuben Henry and Mary Read McCoy Bramlet, was born Oct. 13, 1858, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there Dec. 13, 1940, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Henry married Laura Lucy Glascock on May 28, 1891, at her parents' home in Saline County. Laura was born Feb. 11, 1863, in Galatia, Ill., the daughter of Lucy Haines or Harris and George W. Glascock. Laura died June 26, 1949, in Wasson, Ill., and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Henry signed a petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association and served as a trustee in 1918. Three of their infants, a daughter and two sons, are buried there with a shared tombstone inscribed "Children of Henry & Laura L. Bramlet" with birth and death dates.

Benjamin Bramlett, 1832-1900
   Benjamin Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born circa 1831 in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died after 1900 in Auburn, Sangamon Co., Ill.

   Joseph Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born circa 1834 in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died Oct. 27, 1863, at Vicksburg General Hospital #2, Vicksburg, Miss., while serving as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He rests at Vicksburg National Cemetery. He enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-Ninth Regiment, Illinois Infantry, and was promoted to corporal. His father, Henry, was still living when Joseph perished in 1863, but his mother had died in 1855.

Eight children of Martha M. A. Gregg and William Henry Bramlett and families, courtesy Kenneth R. and Richard Bramlett
   William Henry Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born Feb. 11, 1836, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died there Aug. 31, 1887. He married Martha Mathilda A. Gregg on Jan. 18. 1858. She was born Jan. 29, 1839. She died March 18, 1889. Their children are Sarah Malinda, Henry F., Francis Gregg, Mary Jane, Emily C., Thomas Wilson, Joseph A., Lucy E., Benjamin, George R., Charles G. Bramlett.
   Sarah Malinda Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born circa 1858-59 in Saline Co., Ill. She died in 1942. She married William C. "Billy" Neel. 
   Henry F. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born May 23, 1860. He died Nov. 1, 1864.
   Francis Gregg "Frank" Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born April 9, 1862. He died May 31, 1898. He never married.
   Mary Jane Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born Nov. 18, 1863. She died Feb. 17, 1941. She married John I. McGhee.
   Emily C. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born May 26, 1864. She died Nov. 6, 1865.
   Thomas Wilson Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born Nov. 23, 1866. He died Aug. 4, 1947.
  Joseph A. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born circa 1868-70. He died June 2. 1942.
   Lucy E. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born circa 1873. She died in 1904. She married James Wiley Beasley.
   Benjamin Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett and twin of George R., was born May 25, 1875. He died Aug. 2, 1945.
   George R. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett and twin of Benjamin, was born May 25, 1875. He died Dec. 29, 1959.
   Charles G. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born Dec. 8, 1877. He died Nov. 22, 1962.

Warham Bramlet served as a Soldier in the Union Army during the Civil War
   Warham Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry "Harry" Bramlett, was born July 27, 1837, near Equality in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He is the namesake of his maternal grandfather Warham Easley. He died July 13, 1913, in Harrisburg, Ill., and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery, Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. Warham served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-Ninth Regiment, Illinois Infantry. After the war he returned home and resumed farming. He married Martha Ann Thomas on Nov. 12, 1873, in Saline County. She was born in 1847, the daughter of Sarah H. Johnson and John G. Thomas. She died Jan. 29, 1912, in Eldorado and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. She was a member of Union Grove Baptist Church. Warham and Martha Ann's children are John Nelson Thomas, Harry Allen Bramlet and Horace G. Bramlet.

Warham and Martha Ann Thomas Bramlet's monument in Bramlet Cemetery
   John Bramlett, third child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born circa 1788-1798 in Laurens Co., S. C. He died in Saline Co., Ill., circa 1847-1850 and most likely was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. His grave is no longer marked; however, he may be buried in the central part of the graveyard with a tombstone inscription that has eroded by weather and worn away. John witnessed the marriage license of his sister Margaret Bramlett in 1818 in Christian Co., Ky., when she married Joseph Easley. His signature, John, without surname, written above his father's full name, resulted in some confusion in subsequent years. Reuben signed the document to provide his permission/consent for his minor daughter's wedding, and John signed as the witness. Some researchers misread John's abbreviated signature to be part of his father's name: "Reuben John Bramlet." However, Reuben, did not have the middle name John. He had a son named John, witness on the document, and a brother named John, resident of Greenville Co., S. C., but Reuben did not have a middle name John. John suffered some kind of mental or physical disability in later years. He lived with his brothers Coleman Brown Bramlet and Henry "Harry" Bramlett. Henry signed a receipt of payment for "care and guarding of John" when Coleman settled his father's estate in 1844-1847.


   Nathan Bramlet, fourth child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born Feb. 3, 1799, in Laurens Co., S. C. He wrote his will Nov. 28, 1858, in Saline Co., Ill. He died Dec. 8, 1858, in Pope Co., Ill., and was buried in a local cemetery there. Witnesses to Nathan's will, Alexander Jenkins and Henderson Rude, presented the will in Saline County Probate Court on Jan. 3, 1859. His stated heirs are wife Mary and nine living children. Nathan married a cousin, Mary "Polly" Upchurch. 

Nathan Bramlet in the County of Saline and State of Illinois do hereby make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following (to wit) First it is my will that my funeral expenses and all my just debts be fully paid Second After the payments of such funeral expenses and debts I give devise and bequeath until my beloved wife Mary Bramlet the farm on which we now reside situated in the County of Pope and known and described as the west Half of the North East quarter of Section (1) one in Township No. (11) Eleven South of Range (5) Five East of the third principal meridian during her natural life and all the live stock horses cattle sheep hogs &c by me now owned and kept there also all the household furniture and other articles of personal property not herein enumerated or otherwise described of in this will during her natural life after having disposed of a sufficient amount to pay and discharge the expenses or so much thereof as may remain unexpended. Third I want Nancy Jane Bramlet and Samuel Bramlet to have one bed and bedding to each one and one cow & calf to each one and Samuel Bramlet to have one horse with Forty Dollars when he becomes of age. Fourth) And after the deaths of Mary Bramlet my wife I want every thing that may be left to be sold Land and personal property all sold and equal division made between Benjamin B. Bramlet John D. Bramlet Mary Pinnell Elizabeth F. Pinnell Thomas C. Bramlet Susannah Carrier Nancy Jane Bramlet Samuel Bramlet and Matilda V. Bramlet my kin at Law. And lastly I hereby constitute and appoint my said wife Mary Bramlet executrix of this my last will and testament revoking & annulling all former wills and testaments. In witness whereof I Nathan Bramlet have hereunto set my hand and seal this 24th day of November 1858 Nathan Bramlet Signed Sealed published and delivered by the said Nathan Bramlet as and for his last will and testament in presence of us who in his presence and in the presence of each other and at his request have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto Alexander Jenkins Hndson [Henderson] Rude} Witnesses State of Illinois} Saline County} January term 1859 Probate Court Now on this day appeared in open Court Alexander Jenkins and Henderson Rude two subscribing witnesses to the last will and testament of Nathan Bramlet deceased and after being duly sworn depose and say that they were present at the signing and sealing of the foregoing will that they believed and still believe that the testator Nathan Bramlet was of sound mind and disposing memory at the signing and sealing of said will that they signed said will at the request of said testator in his presence and in the presence of each other and that the will presented to the Court on the 3rd day of January 1859 is the identical will signed by the said Nathan Bramlet as his last will and testament and subscribed by them at his request. Alexander Jenkins Henderson Rude Subscribed and sworn to before me on this 3rd day of January A.D. 1859 R. N. Warfield C. Clk S. Co. (Will Record Vol. 1-3, 1847-1922, pp. 56-57)

   Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet's children are Benjamin Brown Bramlet, John Daniel Bramlet, Mary Bramlet Pinnell, Elizabeth F. Bramlet Pinnell, Thomas C. Bramlet, Susannah Bramlet Carrier, Nancy Jane Bramlet, Samuel Bramlet, Matilda Vance Bramlet.

   Benjamin Brown Bramlet, child of Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died in Pope Co., Ill. Benjamin and second wife, Mary Enceneth Vaughn, lived in Saline County and Pope County. One son is Joseph Henry Bramlet.
   Joseph Henry Bramlet, child of Benjamin Brown Bramlet and second wife, Enceneth Vaughn Bramlet, was born Nov. 19, 1859, in Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill. He died there Dec. 26, 1934, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Joseph married Roena Belle Shepherd on Dec. 25, 1887, at her parents' home in Saline County. Belle, daughter of Mary Greenfield and Edward Shepherd, was born March 6, 1862, in Illinois. She died in Saline County on Feb. 26, 1940, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Joseph signed the petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association in 1918 and served as the group's first president.

Tombstone of John Daniel Bramlet and Sarena Gates in Bramlet Cemetery
   John Daniel Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Upchurch and Nathan Bramlet, was born April 8, 1824, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died Feb. 9, 1915, at home and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Daniel first married Elizabeth Dooley in 1845. He filed for and received a divorce in Saline County. They did not have children. Daniel second married Sarena Gates on May 12, 1850. She was born Dec. 1, 1835. She died July 24, 1906, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Daniel served as a soldier during the Mexican War. He enlisted in Company H, First Illinois Volunteers and was honorably discharged. He served on the board of Bramlet School in 1865-1867. He was a member of Raleigh Baptist Church in 1843 and Union Grove Baptist Church in the 1880s until his death. He was well known in the area as the developer of an animal park on his home farm, adjacent on the east boundary of Bramlet Cemetery and Union Grove Baptist Church, the original homestead of his grandparents Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett. Daniel and Sarena's children are Sarah Ann, Francis Marion ("Frank"), Elizabeth B., Anna Eliza, Meeks Haley, Rosa E., Nancy Jane, Mollie Bramlet.
   Sarah Ann Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born in 1851 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died at age 40 years, 4 months, 2 days, in 1891, in Saline Co., Ill. She married Edmond Cummins there on Jan. 14, 1870. He was born circa 1847 in Kentucky and died sometime after 1876.

Francis Marion "Frank" Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born March 2, 1854, in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. He died Oct. 14, 1940, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. He married Josephine Priscilla Shepherd on Nov. 22, 1877, in Eldorado, Ill. She was born Oct. 10, 1859, in Saline County, the daughter of Sarah Greenfield and Edward Shepherd. She died Feb. 23, 1922, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Their children include Calvin Alexander and Herman Reuben Bramlet.
   Elizabeth B. Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born 1858 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died there in 1880 shortly after the birth of her daughter Belle and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Elizabeth married Reuben Stephen Peebles on July 29, 1878, in Saline County. He was born in 1852 in Tennessee, the son of Annie Hutrell and Edward Peebles. Reuben had been previously married. Belle Peebles married John Swansey. Their child is Tillie Swansey, who is buried in Bramlet.
   Anna Eliza Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born Sept. 24, 1862, in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died June 11, 1947, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Anna married Harrison D. Wise on Jan. 27, 1881, at her parents' home. He was born in 1857 in Indiana, the son of Ann Maria Barrett and Abraham Wise who rest in Wolf Creek Cemetery. Harrison died April 4, 1931, in Saline County and was buried in Bramlet. Their children include Delman Abraham and Nora Ethel Wise.

  Meeks Haley Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born April 6, 1864, in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. He died Sept. 26, 1929, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Meeks is author of A Pioneer Family - Bramlet, published in 1924. He was a local merchant, at one time owning and operating a candy store in Eldorado. Meeks first married Frances L. Vineyard, daughter of David T. Vineyard, on Aug. 19, 1884. Meeks second married Emeretta "Retta" Alderson, daughter of Mary A. Howell and Isaac C. Alderson, on Sept. 29, 1895. Retta, born in 1866 in Indiana, died July 10, 1925, and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. Meeks third married Verna B. Anderson in Hot Springs, Ark. She was born March 24, 1878, in Missouri, the daughter of Sarah Fundolph and Ira Green of Missouri. Verna died July 17, 1941, and was buried beside Meeks in Bramlet Cemetery.

   Rosa E. Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born in August 1866 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died June 21, 1957, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery.

 Nancy JaneBramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born in 1871 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died in 1956 in Eldorado, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. She married Will Dunn on Nov. 1, 1898, at her parents' home. He was born in 1869, the son of Mary Brandon and John C. Dunn of Stonefort. Will died in 1946 and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Their daughter Thelma Dunn, born Sept. 4, 1899, and died Nov. 17, 1914, rest in Bramlet Cemetery with an inscribed marker: "Budded on Earth to Bloom in Heaven." Will signed a petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association in 1918 and served as one of the first trustees.

   Mollie Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born 1872 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died 1944 and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Mollie married Robert Willis Joiner Oct. 4, 1898, at her parents' home. He was born in 1865 in Missouri, the son of Jane Trammell and Lucas Joiner. Robert died 1949 in Saline County and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Beulah Opal Joiner, child of Mollie Bramlet and Robert Willis Joiner, married Goodman Lee Lewis and Thurman Daniel Gibson. Her children buried in Bramlet: Charles Lewis, Nancy E. Lewis, Daniel Gibson. Sylvia Jane Joiner, child of Mollie Bramlet and Robert Willis Joiner, married Omer Lincoln Owens. Sylvia rests in Bramlet Cemetery.
   Mary Bramlet Pinnell, child of Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill. 
   Elizabeth F. Bramlet Pinnell, child of Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill. 
   Thomas C. Bramlet, child of Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill. 
   Susannah Bramlet Carrier, child of Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill. 
   Nancy Jane Bramlet, child of Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill.

Samuel Bramlet served as a Soldier in the Union Army during the Civil War
Samuel Bramlet, child of Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet, was born circa 1840 in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died March 19, 1885, at Tip Top, Yavipai Co., Ariz., and was buried there. Samuel served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private and was promoted to sergeant in Company H, Thirty-First Regiment, Illinois Infantry. He married Susan Simpson Shockley on Oct. 23, 1866, in Saline Co., Ill. She was born circa 1838 in Gallatin Co., Ill., the daughter of Rachel Crider and Isaac Simpson. Susan died June 8, 1906, in Galena, Cherokee Co., Kans. Susan first married Curtis M. Shockley on Dec. 3, 1856, in Saline County. He was born Jan. 1, 1828, in South Carolina, the son of Rosina Jane McQuay and David Shockley. Curtis died Dec. 11, 1862, while serving as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted in Company K, Thirteenth Regiment, Illinois Infantry. Susan applied for a widow's and survivor's pensions based on his war service. Curtis and Susan's children are William D. C., Thomas A. and Mariah Clementine Shockley. (Curtis was previously married June 13, 1850, to Barbara Elizabeth Tucker. She was born circa 1829 in Saline Co., Ill. She died there Oct. 16, 1855. Barbara and Curtis had children Warren T. and David H. M. Shockley.) Susan and Samuel's children are Franklin Lumsford "Lum" Bramlet, 1868-post 1930?; Mary E., 1870-post 1905; and Martha Ann Bramlet, 1872-1957, who married Alexander Davis.
  
Susan Simpson Shockley Bramlet, left, circa 1880s, Joplin, Mo.; tintype of Martha Ann Bramlet, circa 1877, Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill.; and right, Franklin Lumsford "Lum" Bramlet, circa 1885, Galena, Ill., courtesy descendant Samuel Bramlett Bartee of Oklahoma.
   Matilda Vance Bramlet, youngest child of Nathan and Mary "Polly" Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill. 

Survey of Bramlet Cemetery, Raleigh Township, Saline County, Illinois
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ilsaline/bramlet.htm
All Cemetery Images Copyright, Courtesy Deborah G. Dennis


Coleman Brown Bramlet established Bramlet Cemetery on his farm following the death of a daughter in 1837.

Bramlet Cemetery is situated in Section 26 of Raleigh Township, Saline Co., Ill., and located about two miles north of Muddy, Ill., three miles south of Raleigh, Ill., and about three and a half miles southwest of Eldorado, Ill. Bramlet Cemetery was established in the Bramlett Settlement of Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill., circa 1838, according to the late Wanda I. Thomas and Fred H. Bramlet. However, the rural graveyard, located on land then owned by Coleman Brown Bramlet, probably was established at the death of his young daughter Manerva on Sept. 5, 1837. Although her grave is no longer marked with an inscribed tombstone, there are four very old and worn stone grave markers in the cemetery. (The oldest grave with an intact inscribed marker is that of Malinda Easley, who died in 1855. She is second wife of Coleman's older brother Henry "Harry" Bramlett.) Before 1837-38, most or all Bramlet family members were buried in Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery near Eldorado. Wolf Creek Cemetery, first known as Brown Family Graveyard, is situated on land originally purchased by one of Coleman Brown Bramlet's maternal uncles, Coleman Brown, on Jan. 1, 1816. Both of Coleman Brown Bramlet's parents, Elizabeth Brown, who died circa 1830, sister of Coleman Brown, and Revolutionary War veteran Reuben Bramlett, who died in 1844, are buried there. Coleman first farmed with his father and homesteaded his own farm, which was adjacent to Reuben's land. Bramlet Cemetery, comprising about two acres, is located in a small grove of trees just southwest of the site of Coleman's log cabin on what he later named Union Grove Farm. The cemetery is surrounded by land that was farmed by Bramlets and their descendants for more than 180 years. Coleman's Union Grove Farm was passed down to Hezekiah Bramlet, who officially donated land to the cemetery. His grandson Fred Hezekiah Bramlet later inherited the farm and was actively involved in the care and maintenance of the cemetery until his death in 1987. 
   Bramlet Cemetery Association, formally organized circa 1918 by a group of family members to manage, administer and maintain the site. The State of Illinois granted the association charter on Feb. 27, 1918. The petition for organization was signed by Coleman Brown Bramlet's son Hezekiah Bramlet and by John N. Bramlet, Q. (Quincy) A. Bramlet, Joseph H. Bramlet, W. R. Joiner, Will Dunn, J. Nelson Thomas, R. H. Bramlet and Robert Moore. In March 1918 Hezekiah Bramlet donated land through his father's original homestead for the first cemetery road. John N. Bramlet later donated some land west of the cemetery to the association for the current road. John P. Upchurch surveyed the cemetery on March 11, 1918. Hezekiah Bramlet then deeded the cemetery land to Bramlet Cemetery Association on March 14, 1918. In 1920 the association erected a woven wire fence to keep livestock out of the cemetery. Later wild and cultivated roses were planted along the fence to enhance the natural beauty of the small rural cemetery. The roses grew on the fence for many years until it was removed in the 1970s after it deteriorated and became entangled with brush. Several large old shade and cedar trees grow in and around the perimeter of the cemetery. Maintenance and administration, funded mainly by memorial gifts and donations, is still managed by Bramlet Cemetery Association. Deborah G. Dennis and Gary M. Dennis surveyed the cemetery to document tombstones and inscriptions in August 1978, August 1993, and October 16-17, 1998. Bramlet Cemetery Survey was shared to the Saline County Genealogical Society and published online, then linked to Rootsweb and Ancestry.com. For more information and later burials at Bramlet not referenced in this text, please visit the survey web site.


Coleman Brown Bramlet and Susannah Upchurch
Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis
  
Tombstone of Coleman Brown Bramlet and Susannah Upchurch at Bramlet Cemetery, Saline Co., Ill.
Images by Deborah G. Dennis. The companion tombstone has a long worn epitaph at the bottom which begins "Behold 
the pilgrims..." Inscription: "C. B. Bramlet Born Feb. 15, 1802 Died Feb. 28, 1889 Aged 87 Y. & 13 D." and 
"Susannah Wife of C. B. Bramlet Born Nov. 26, 1804 Died Sept. 10, 1889 Aged 84 Y. 9 M. & 14 D." 

   Coleman Brown Bramlett, fifth child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born Feb, 15, 1802 in Kentucky. A family Bible entry lists his birthplace as Caldwell Co., Ky., which is adjacent to Christian Co., Ky., where his parents lived and farmed several years before moving to Illinois. (Coleman is named after his maternal uncle Coleman Brown, brother of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett and an early 1814 settler of present-day Saline County.) Coleman married Susannah "Sooky" "Susan" Upchurch on July 17, 1823, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She was born Nov. 26, 1804, in Lebanon, Wilson Co., Tenn., the daughter of Mary Ellen Simmons and Samuel Upchurch. Susannah died Sept. 10, 1889, and was buried beside Coleman in Bramlet Cemetery with an elaborate inscribed companion tombstone. A devoted religious leader, Coleman was one of the core group organizers of Union Grove Primitive Baptist Church, which was established in 1881 and constructed after a large religious meeting held in the grove of trees that stood by his residence on part of his property, renamed Union Grove Farm. The church, now known as Union Grove Baptist Church, still stands and holds services today. Church membership records and histories indicate Coleman and Susannah were previous members of three other local houses of worship: Bethel Creek Primitive Baptist Church in 1826, Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church in 1830, and Raleigh Missionary Baptist Church in 1843-1881. Coleman died Feb. 28, 1889, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery, which he established circa 1837 on his farm following the death of his young daughter Manervia. Some years before Coleman's death when Dr. Frederick F. Johnson amputated one of his legs due to an infection from a rusty nail, Coleman selected his gravesite in Bramlet Cemetery and had the leg buried in it. Tradition holds that he was the only one-legged man in his community. He walked with a crutch and a cane. Coleman and Susannah's son Thomas Brown Bramlet is the direct ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis. Coleman and Susannah's children are Burrell, Thomas Brown, John, Nathaniel, Bluford, William H., Manervia, George B., Reuben Henderson, Martha, Hezekiah Bramlet.
Land Record with Full Name of Coleman Brown Bramlet
Shawneetown Land Office, Gallatin County, Illinois: Certificate 2747 Coleman Brown Bramlet of Gallatin County, Illinois, purchased 80 acres--the SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 and the NW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 26 in Twp. 8 South Range 5 East, in Gallatin County July 28, 1838.
Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet Bible Records
Transcribed Especially for Deborah G. Dennis by the late Fred H. and Wanda I. Bramlet, Saline Co., Ill., 1979

C. B. Bramlet born Feb. 15, 1802
Susannah Upchurch Bramlet born Nov. 26, 1804

Married 1823
Children:

Burrell Bramlet born May 1, 1824

Thomas B. Bramlet born Dec. 21, 1826

John Bramlet born Aug. 17, 1828

Nathaniel Bramlet born May 14, 1830

Bluford Bramlet born Feb. 22, 1832

William H. Bramlet born May 12, 1834 

[died while serving in the Civil War]

Manervia Bramlet born Dec. 25, 1836

[died 1837, not mentioned in father's will]

George B. Bramlet born July 12, 1839

[died before 1860, not mentioned in father's will]

Ruben H. Bramlet born Feb. 7, 1842

Martha Bramlet born June 20, 1844

Hezekiah Bramlet born Jan. 14, 1848
--
M. Jane Bramlet born July 22, 1832

[Mary Jane Elder, wife of Bluford Bramlet]

W. C. Bramlet born Oct. 28, 1855

[W. E., Warner Ewing, 1st child of Bluford and Mary Jane]

Elizabeth Bramlet born March 22, 1857

 [Elizabeth "Eliza" Ann, 2nd child of Bluford and Mary Jane]

M. C. Bramlet born May 18, 1858
[M. E., Martha Elizabeth, 3rd child of Bluford and Mary Jane]
--
Elizabeth Dunn
--
   Burrell Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born May 1, 1824, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died at age 74 years, 7 months, 13 days, on Dec. 14, 1898, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. He married a cousin, Mary "Polly" Brown, on Sept. 17, 1846. She was born circa 1830 in Gallatin Co., Ill., the daughter of Paletire Ellis Cox and Marvel Brown and granddaughter of Nancy Hiott/Hyatt and Coleman Brown. Mary died after the 1880 census, perhaps in Polo, Carroll Co., Ark., or in Missouri or Illinois. "Burrill Bramlet," 56, farmer, and wife, Mary, 50, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Polo, Carroll Co., Ark., with four grown and minor children: Thomas C., 26; Fredric, 19; Martha E., 14; Charles, 12 (NARA Film T9:39:209C). Mary and Burrell's children include Louisa J., James Monroe, Susan E., Thomas Coleman, Rufus Hiram, George Frederick, Martha Emily, Charles Bramlet.
Burrell Bramlet's tombstone in Bramlet Cemetery
   Louisa J. Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1847 in Saline Co., Ill. She died in 1895. She married William Jackson "Jack" Crafford on March 22, 1868. He was born in 1840 in Indiana or Illinois and died after 1900. "Louisa J. Crafford," 23, and husband, Wm. J., 26, are listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Twp. 8 Range 6, Saline Co., Ill., with four children: Jno. M., 6; Clementine, 4; Rebecca E., 2; Rosa J., 4/12 (NARA Film M593:274:450A). Their children include John M., Clementine, Rebecca E., Rosa J., James Harrison, Julia Ellen Crafford,

   James Harrison Crafford, born Feb. 14, 1873, Illinois, and died Nov. 27, 1952, Ash Hill, Butler Co., Mo., married Pearl Burton.
   Julia Ellen Crafford, born Aug. 7, 1874, Missouri, and died Jan. 28, 1953, Fisk, Butler Co., Mo., married James Daniel Sisco.
   James Monroe Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1848 in Saline Co., Ill. He died Jan, 1864, during a revolt at Camp Butler, Springfield, Sangamon Co., Ill., and was buried there.
   Susan E. Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1853 in Saline Co., Ill. She died Nov. 28, 1886, in Saline County and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery beside her husband. She married James L. Haley on Feb. 28, 1867. He was born June 12, 1845, the son of Rose A. Gregg and Meeks Haley, natives of Georgia. James died Nov. 26, 1886, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery with an inscribed tombstone. Their Infants, born between 1868 and 1882, are buried in Bramlet with inscribed but now illegible grave markers: Mary E., Rosa E., May, Grace C. Haley.
   Thomas Coleman Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1854 in Saline Co., Ill. He died after the 1880 census, perhaps in Carroll Co., Ark.
   Rufus Hiram Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1858 in Saline Co., Ill.
   George Frederick Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1861 in Saline Co., Ill. He died after the 1880 census, perhaps in Carroll Co., Ark.
   Martha Emily Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born July 21, 1866, in Missouri. She died in 1941 in Portales, Roosevelt Co., New Mex.
   Charles Bramlet, child of Mary "Polly" Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1868 in Missouri. He died after the 1880 census, perhaps in Carroll Co., Ark.
Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis
   Thomas Brown Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Dec. 21, 1826, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died Feb. 6, 1901, in Texas Co., Mo., He first married Rebecca Jane Hanley on Jan. 21, 1847, in Saline Co., Ill. She was born circa 1828 in Tennessee. She died circa 1889 in Texas Co., Mo. They moved their family from Saline Co., Ill., circa 1876-1878 to Texas Co., Mo., where they settled on homesteaded land. He grew corn, wheat, potatoes and peaches in relatively poor soil and when enough rain fell in winter and early spring. His property today is a large cattle ranch worth more than $250,000. The land has a large creek running through lined with several caves which house many copperheads and other poisonous reptilian inhabitants. The owner still refers to them as "Bramlet Caves" and has a sign there with the name on a tree by the creek. A woodshed near the house may have been built and used by Thomas. 
   Thomas signed his name as "T. B. Bramlet" in a letter written to his parents in 1888:
Summerville Texas County August the 20 1888 Dear father & mother & all in quire ing frends i am in good helth & hope this will find you all well it has been a long time since i hered from you & i want to here from [you] very bad reny is not well george is at winona on the current river rail rode he wont work on the farm we hav tolerable good corn but no wheat hardly in the county the wheat is 50 cents a bushel potatoes ar good & worth 30 cents times is hard & no pros pect of being better i am at home a gain & a dry ing peaches & hav not time to write any more at this time write soon yours T B Bramlet --copy of letter, handwritten with pencil, courtesy the late Fred H. and Wanda I. (Thomas) Bramlet.
"Reny" mentioned in the letter must be his daughter Sarena C. Bramlet who married Sampson Benjamin Bell in 1883. George is one of his sons. In another letter home in 1889, Thomas reported his wife Rebecca had "pneumony fever." She may have died that winter. Thomas and Rebecca's children are Henry Coleman, John Milton ("Mit"), Susan Amanda, Mary Ann Elisabeth ("Betsy"), Hannah Elvira, George William, Sarena C. Bramlet.
   Thomas second married Sirena Smith on Feb. 17, 1889, in Texas County. She survived him. Their child is Clarence A. Bramlett, 1892-1960, who lived in Missouri, Oklahoma and Kansas. After Thomas died, Sirena married W. S. Harvill Jr. She died in 1910 in Columbus, Kans.Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis
   Henry Coleman Bramlett, child of Rebecca Jane Hanley and Thomas Brown Bramlet, was born in 1848 in Saline Co., Ill. He died a suicide by drowning himself in the Mississippi River circa 1876-1878, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery, according to Meeks Haley Bramlet in A Pioneer Family - Bramlet. His grave may be among three others with markers or field stones that have worn inscriptions in the central part of the cemetery under tall cedar trees. According to grandson Claude Ted Bramlett and granddaughter Lora Geneva Bramlett, now decesed, Henry was distraught about the family's move from Saline County into Missouri. He had married a cousin, Mary Matilda Miner, the daughter of Susan Brown and Montgomery Miner. (Montgomery Miner is son of Elilzabeth Briley and Daniel Looney Miner.) Henry Coleman and Mary Matilda are parents of three children: Matthew Montgomery, James Thomas and Tiny Jane Bramlet, and apparently did not want to leave his small farm. His body reportedly was recovered and taken back to Saline County for burial, and his wife and two surviving children continued on to Missouri with his parents. Mary Matilda later settled in Carter Co., Mo. Mary Matilda Miner was born April 5, 1843, in Gallatin Co., Ill. (She is the granddaughter of Paletire Ellis Cox and Marvel Brown and the great-granddaughter of Nancy Hiott/Hyatt? and Coleman Brown, the latter known as early settlers of Saline County in 1814-1816 before Illinois became a state. Coleman Brown is the brother of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett, wife of Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844.) Claude Ted Bramlett referred to his grandmother as "Matildy."
   Mary Matilda Miner Bramlett second married James W. Graham in Missouri. Their child is Warner Graham.  Not much is known about James and Warner.

Believed to be James W. Graham, father of Warner Graham, courtesy descendant Evelyn Acord
Mary Matilda third married Andrew Jackson Freeman, a farmer, in Missouri. He was born July 22, 1829, in North Carolina, the son of Mary Elizabeth Ball and Thomas Freeman, according to his Missouri Death Certificate 20575. "Matilda Freeman" of Fremont, Mo., signed her named on the document as informant. Matthew Montgomery Bramlett, listed as "M. M. Bramlettt" of Fremont is named as undertaker. Andrew died June 25, 1911, in Pike Township, Carter County, and was buried in Freeman Cemetery, Fremont, Carter Co., Mo., with a soldier's headstone, Company H, Twenty-Second Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate States Army. He reportedly served as a Confederate and Union soldier in North Carolina during the Civil War/War Between the States. Mary Matilda applied for and received a pension based on his war service in Company C, Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Union Army, on Aug. 1, 1911, in Missouri. Andrew had applied for a pension on Aug. 10, 1891. Mary Matilda, who died June 23, 1916, in Pike Twp., Carter Co., Mo., is buried beside him in a grave marked with a fieldstone. (The graveyard was once known as Big Barren, Pine Grove and Abrams Cemetery. Directions: from Fremont, Hwy. 60 East about 1 mile to J Hwy. Turn right (south) and travel 6.4 miles to County Road 174, turn right and travel 0.6 miles, cemetery is on the right.)
Andrew Jackson Freeman's Confederate Marker, courtesy Heather Powell-Hobson

Matthew Montgomery Bramlett, sitting left with son Claude Ted, about age 2, and wife, Birdie Mae Shomaker Bramlett, standing left behind them; daughter Maude Mae, age 3, sitting right with her grandfather William Albert Shomaker Sr., her grandmother Mary Elizabeth West Shomaker standing behind; middle: Birdie's sister Alcie Evaline Shomaker Reynolds and brother-in-law James Benjamin Reynolds in middle. Photo dated about 1902, Carter County, Missouri.
Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis
   Matthew Mongtomery Bramlett, child of Mary Matilda Miner and Henry Coleman Bramlett, was born Dec. 16, 1875, in Harrisburg, Saline Co., Ill. He died Nov. 14, 1958, in Knox Co., Ill., and was buried in Oak Lawn Memorial Gardens Cemetery. He married Birdie Mae Shomaker in 1897 in Missouri. She was born June 26, 1881, in Fremont, Carter Co., Mo., the daughter of Mary Elizabeth West and William Albert Shomaker. Birdie died Feb. 25, 1968, in Knox Co., Ill., and was buried beside Matthew. They had fourteen children: Maude Mae, Claude Ted, Mary Belle, Jettie Pearl, Grace Ella, Lora Geneva, Beulah Leona, Coleman William, Alma Elizabeth, Edna Alpha, Clyde Harding, Cecil Carl, John Lloyd and Infant Son Bramlett.
Claude Ted Bramlett 1900-1990 and Margaret Knight 1905-1979, grandparents of Deborah G. Dennis
   Claude Ted Bramlett married Margaret Knight in Arkansas. They moved to Knox Co., Ill., circa 1933. They rest in Oak Lawn Memorial Gardens, Galesburg, Ill. Their children are Dorothy Willadee, Erma Lee (deceased) and Harold Eugene Bramlett.
   James Thomas Bramlett, child of Mary Matilda Miner and Henry Coleman Bramlett, was born Dec. 23, 1871, in Harrisburg, Saline Co., Ill. He died Dec. 24, 1947, in Missouri and was buried in Freeman Cemetery, Fremont, Carter Co., Mo. He married Lucy Lee Huddleston. She was born in 1889. She died in Missouri and was buried in Freeman Cemetery. They had three children born in Missouri: Benjamin Franklin Thomas, 1918-post-1940, who lived in a state mental hospital; Dorothy, 1920-1929; and Dora Matilda Violet Bramlett, 1923-1925.
   Tiny Jane Bramlett, child of Mary Matilda Miner and Henry Coleman Bramlett, was born circa 1873 in Saline Co., Ill. She died of scarlet fever circa 1875-76, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Her grave is no longer marked with a legible tombstone. It may be with three or four others in the central part of the graveyard under large cedar trees.

   John B. Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Aug. 17, 1828 in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died Dec. 13, 1860, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. John married Emily Harriett Stricklin on Oct. 1, 1850. She was born Dec. 19, 1824. She died Nov. 22, 1877, and was buried beside John. Their children are Quincy Ambrose, Martha Jane, Sarah Elizabeth, Willis A., Mary Catherine, John N. Bramlet.

  Quincy Ambrose Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born Oct. 23, 1851, in Saline Co., Ill. He died Feb. 16, 1924, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. He married Nancy Ann "Nannie" Shepherd on April 24, 1873, in Saline County. She was born there June 10, 1849, the daughter of Sarah Greenfield and Edward Shepherd. Nancy died there April 28, 1936, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Their child is Emily U. Bramlet who died young.


Martha Jane Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born Dec. 12, 1852, in Saline County. She died Oct. 16, 1861, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery.

   Sarah Elizabeth Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born Oct. 29, 1854, in Saline Co., Ill. She died there Feb. 20, 1870, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery.

 Willis A. Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born May 29, 1857, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there July 1, 1858. The tombstone, shown above, is inscribed "Gone too soon."

   Mary Catherine Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born May 6, 1859. She died Dec. 6, 1868, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery.


   John N. Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born May 9, 1861, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there Aug. 4, 1943. He married Ora Glascock on Oct. 1, 1893, in Raleigh, Ill. Ora, daughter of Mary Frances Upton and Ewing S. Glascock, was born Aug. 1, 1876, in Saline County and died Oct. 31, 1922, in Evansville, Ind.
   Nathaniel Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born May 14, 1830, in Gallatin Co., Ill. He is buried in Equality Cemetery. He married Mary Elizabeth Keasler. Some of their children are buried in Bramlet Cemetery with inscribed tombstones: Infant Son, Sept. 12, 1858--Oct. 3, 1858; Nancy Ann, Oct. 4, 1860, age 3 months, 5 days; William M., Aug. 18, 1863--Sept. 24, 1864; Lilla C., Nov. 30, 1869--Oct. 7, 1870.
   Bluford Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Feb. 22, 1832, in Gallatin Co., Ill. He married Mary Jane Elder, who was born July 22, 1832 in Gallatin Co., Ill. Their children are Warner Ewing, Elizabeth ("Eliza") and Martha Elizabeth Bramlet.
   Warner Ewing Bramlet was born Oct. 28, 1855, in Gallatin Co., Ill.
   Elizabeth "Eliza" Bramlet was born March 22, 1857, in Gallatin Co., Ill.

   Martha Elizabeth Bramlet was born May 18, 1858, in Gallatin Co., Ill.


William H. Bramlet served aas a Soldier in the Union Army during the Civil War
   William H. Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born May 12, 1834, in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died while serving as a Union soldier during the Civil War. William married Elizabeth J. Stricklin. Their daughter Susan Ellen Bramlet married William Franklin Armistead. They are buried in Sunset Hill Cemetery. Two of their children are buried in Bramlet Cemetery with inscribed tombstones: Infant Daughter Armistead, Aug. 28, 1876--Aug. 30, 1876, and Charles Albert Armistead, Aug. 26, 1879--Nov. 12, 1881. 
   Lucinda Caroline Jane Bramlet, child of William H. and Elizabeth J. Stricklin Bramlet, was born Feb. 7, 1858, in Saline Co., Ill. She died at age 96 on Oct. 12, 1951, and was buried in Raleigh Masonic Cemetery with second husband, Charles Ferrell Hale. Lucinda first married John K. Armistead on Feb. 15, 1877. He was born circa 1855 in Dixon Springs, Smith Co., Tenn., the son of Malinda Jackson Farmer and George Thompson Armistead. John reportedly died circa 1897 after returning from the Spanish-American War and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Lucinda and John's children are William A. and Prudence Armistead. Lucinda second married Charles Ferrell Hale. He was born June 12, 1862. He died Jan. 17, 1920, and was buried in Raleigh Masonic Cemetery. Lucinda shares his tombstone.
   Manervia Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Dec. 25, 1836, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died 1837 and was the first person buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Her death apparently prompted the establishment of the family graveyard. She may be buried next to a brother inside a rectangular double plot outlined with several small square blocks and no marker.

   George B. Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born July 12, 1839 in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died March 15, 1855, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. He may be buried next to a sister inside a rectangular double plot outlined with several small square blocks and no marker.
  

Reuben Henderson Bramlet and Euphemia Ellen Wren
   Reuben Henderson Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Feb. 7, 1842, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died in 1925 at home near Selma, Fresno Co., Calif., and was buried in Mountain View Cemetery. He went west in 1867 and attended University of the Pacific. He began teaching at Selma and later became county superintendent, auditor and assessor. At retirement, he moved to his ranch near Selma where he farmed. He also was a stockholder in several cooperative fruit grower associations. He married Euphemia Ellen Wren, also a native of Illinois. They had four children, of whom two daughters survived childhood and married.


   Martha Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born June 20, 1844, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She married John Stricklin.

Hezekiah Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Jan. 14, 1848, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there on Jan. 19, 1919, from an infection caused by a rusty nail and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. He married Elizabeth Annie Jones on Aug. 1, 1869, in Saline County. She was born Sept. 15, 1848, in Illinois, the daughter of Nancy C. Slaton and John W. Jones. Annie died Aug. 21, 1934, in Saline County and was buried beside Hezekiah in Bramlet Cemetery. Their children are Nancy S., Warner Reuben, Catharine, Edward Joseph, Walter Everett Bramlet.


   Margaret "Peggy" Bramlett, sixth child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born Dec. 20, 1804, in Christian Co., Ky. She died April 8, 1855, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. She was a minor when she married Joseph Easley on Nov. 26, 1818, with her father Reuben's written consent in Christian Co., Ky. Her brother John Bramlett witnessed the marriage record by only signing his given name, John, above his father's full signature, leading some researchers to come to the mistaken conclusion that Reuben Bramlett had the middle name "John." However, Reuben did not have a middle name: He had a son named John and a brother named John; but his middle name was not John. He did not have a middle name. Joseph was born Dec. 15 1795, in Stokes Co., N. C. He died March 15, 1868, in Saline County and was buried at Wolf Creek. Joseph Easly, 63, born in North Carolina, widowed, retired farmer, $1,300 real estate, $200 personal estate, is listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Eldorado P. O., Twp. 8 Range 7 East, Saline Co., Ill., living with Joseph Read, 60, born Georgia, farmer, $1,300 real estate, $400 personal estate, and wife, Mina, 68, born North Carolina (NARA Film M653:223:881). Margaret and Joseph's children is Elvira Easley.


   Elvira Easley, child of Margaret "Peggy" Bramlett and Joseph Easley, was born Sept. 27, 1824, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died Nov. 21, 1907, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. She married Fuel Moore on March 25, 1842. Fuel was born Oct. 2, 1810, in Tennessee, the son of Joab Moore Sr. Fuel died Jan. 17, 1883, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Their children are Joab, Robert, and John Henry Moore.

   Joab Moore, child of Elvira Easley and Fuel Moore, was born Dec. 12, 1846, near Ralieigh, Ill. He died at age 64 years, 11 months, 2 days, on Nov. 14, 1911, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Joab married Martha Ann Smith on Dec. 19, 1871, in Saline County. Martha was born July 29, 1847, in Illinois. She died Aug. 21, 1918, at Muddy, Ill., and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Their child is W. Elbert Moore who moved to Arkansas. Two of his infant children are buried at Bramlet. Another child is George Melvin Moore who married Daisy Mae Barton and Clara Agnes Dunn.
 
 

   John Henry Moore, child of Elvira Easley and Fuel Moore, was born Oct. 24, 1848, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there June 27, 1908, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. John first married Louisa C. Bishop on Feb. 22, 1866, in Raleigh, Ill. She was born 1851, the daughter of Ona L. Johnson and Robert Jeremiah Bishop. Louisa died in 1875. John second married Mary Josephine Ann "Josie" Jones on Jan. 1, 1879. Josie was born April 5, 1851. She is buried beside John. The inscription on their tombstone is worn away: "The golden gates....home...." Some of John and Louisa's young children and some of John and Josie's young children are buried in Bramlet Cemetery with inscribed markers. John and Louisa's daughter Sarah Catherine Moore, born Dec. 19, 1873, and died Dec. 14, 1954, is buried at Bramlet. She married Alexander A. Groves and CharleS McAllister.

   Robert Moore, child of Elvira Easley and Fuel Moore, was born Aug. 2, 1862, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there May 17, 1851, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Robert signed the petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association and served as one of the first trustees. He married Ella Barker, daughter of Lydia McFarland and Abe Barker. She was born May 1, 1870. She died Oct. 14, 1855, and was buried in Bramlet Cemetery. Their child is Freda Mary Moore who married Clyde E. Gates.
   Elizabeth Bramlett, seventh child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born circa 1806 in Christian Co., Ky. She probably died circa 1847-1850 in Saline Co., Ill. Her burial place is unknown. She married Elijah Baker on Dec. 24, 1829, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. Elijah was born circa 1800-1805 in Kentucky. He died after 1860. "Elijah Baker," 45, born Kentucky, farmer, is listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill., with seven grown and minor children born Illinois: Elizabeth, 19; Elvira, 17; Ellender, 6; Emily, 12; Edmond, 8; Reuben, 8; Lucinda, 3 (NARA Film M432:127:53A). Elizabeth and Elijah's children include Elizabeth, Elvira C., Emily, Edmond, Reuben, Ellender, Lucinda Mariah Baker.
   Elizabeth Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1831 in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died after 1860 and before 1902. She married James Slaten on Feb. 2, 1854, in Saline County. He died after 1860.
   Elvira C. Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born April 8, 1833, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died Feb. 27, 1899, at Big Ridge, Saline Co., Ill. She married Elijah Johnson on Aug. 6, 1853, in Saline County. He was born circa 1834. He died in 1907.
   Emily Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1838 in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died before 1902. She married William Pankey on Dec. 17, 1854, in Saline County.
   Edmond Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1842 in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died April 9, 1904, in Saline County. He married his wife, Frances, circa 1860.
   Reuben Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1842 in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died July 11, 1884. He married Araminta J. Thomas on July 25, 1861, in Saline County. She was born circa 1840 in Illinois. She died circa 1880.
   Ellender Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1844 in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died before 1902.
   Lucinda Mariah Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1847 in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died after 1904. She married Felix Rude on Aug. 23, 1868, in Saline County. He was born circa 1847 and died after 1880.
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Chapter 3:
Generation 5

William? Bramlett and Unknown Hendricks/Hendrix
William Bramlett, perhaps child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born circa 1763 in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Lawrence Co., Tenn., circa 1830. William married a woman named Hendricks/Hendrix before 1790 in South Carolina. They lived in Laurens County in 1790 and in Spartanburg County in 1800 before moving to Kentucky and Tennessee. He may be the young William Bramlett who purchased a state land grant of 387 acres in Laurens County in 1787. The tract, surveyed by Andrew Thomson for William Bramlet on Jan. 29, 1787, is situated on branches of Warrior and Beaver Dam Creek on Enoree River in Ninety-Six Dist., S. C. (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S213190, vol. 12, p. 86). (William Bramblett who owned the 1773 royal land grant there died in or before that year; and no other men named William Bramlet/Bramlett/Bramblett have been found in the early families who lived in Laurens County in/by 1787-1790 or in extant records. This William's neighbors in February that year, 1787, are listed as Richard Richardson, Robert Henry Hughes, John Higgins (S213190, vol. 12, p. 110). The William Bramlett who lived in Laurens in 1790 and Spartanburg in 1800 farmed a few years in Christian Co., Ky., near Henry Jr.'s son Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, most likely his brother, around 1810-1815 before moving on before 1818 to Lawrence Co., Tenn. Census data indicate one son of William--Henry--was born in 1800 in South Carolina, and another--Joel--was born in Kentucky in 1810. Four of William's sons--James, Henry, Joel and Larkin--left Tennessee before 1820, perhaps stopping first in Arkansas, to buy land/settle in White Co., Ill., which is adjacent to Gallatin/Saline County where Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, and Elizabeth Brown and family settled in 1818.
   (Note: This William is sometimes confused with William Bramlett III, son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., who settled in Darlington Co., S. C., circa 1800-1801 and lived there and in Sumter Co., S. C., until he died in 1840. This William III married a woman named Jane, but not Hendrix; and had several children, some named after his Bedford Co., Va., siblings, parents and extended family members: Callaway, Ballard, etc.)
   William Bramlett of Tennessee married Unknown Hendrix in South Carolina and had a large family there and in Kentucky and Tennessee, and lived until about 1830 in Lawrence Co., Tenn. He is listed with wife and thirteen children/younger others enumerated with him in the 1820 Lawrence Co., Tenn., census. Some of his children may have lived in Lawrence, Hickman and Obion counties. James, Henry, Joel and Larkin are some of the younger sons; and another son is named Sandford. The names of these sons and the fact that William and Sandford Bramlett, son of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, both left South Carolina about the same time and both eventually settled in Tennessee, suggest that William may be the son of Elizabeth and William. (Their son Enoch Sr. had sons James, Henry, Joel; and their son Newton had a son named Larkin.) However, William of Laurens and Spartanburg also lived for some time near Henry Jr.'s son Reuben in Kentucky and later this William's younger sons (James, Henry, Joel and Larkin) settled in White Co., Ill., which is adjacent to Gallatin Co., Ill., where Reuben settled in 1818 and still lived in 1830-1844. Records have not yet been discovered to conclusively document the connection between William and parents.
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Chapter 3:
Generation 5

John Bramlett and Mary Peak
(Children: William, Margaret, Natthan, Nancy, Reuben, Alcey, John Wesley, Mildred, Rosa, Mary, Henry, Susannah, Elias)
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
South Carolina State Seal and Motto: While I Breathe, I Hope

Father John Bramlett, child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born May 15, 1764, in Fauquier Co., Va. His full birth and death dates are inscribed in a Bramlett Bible owned by one of his descendants and on his tombstone. The monument indicates he was born in Virginia. He died at age 91 on July 28, 1855, at home on his farm south of Greenville, S. C., close to his church and was buried beside his wife, Mary Peak, there, in Bethel Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church Cemetery, near Simpsonville, S. C. One side of John’s tombstone is inscribed "John Bramlett Born Virginia May 15, 1764. Died July 28, 1855. Mary Peak May 16, 1763 June 23, 1853." The other side of the monument memorializes "Susan His Daughter" and praises “John Bramlett For 73 Years A Leader in Christian Work” and “The founder Of Bethel Church. He Had The Witness That He Pleased God.” The church honors John each year by laying a wreath on his grave during its Founder’s Day celebrations. Co-founders Solomon Holland and Devereaux Yeargin with family members also played important roles in the establishment and early development of the church. John also co-founded with his mother and siblings Bethel’s mother church, Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church, near Gray Court, Laurens Co., S. C., in 1780-1781. John, who joined the Methodist Church at age 16 in 1780 at his widowed mother Margaret’s home in Virginia, was a revered lay minister deeply devoted to God, church and family.

 

 





John and Marys tombstone in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, S. C.

Bethel United Methodist Church, Simpsonville, S. C.

John’s Life in Virginia
   The Fauquier County land on which John was born and where he grew up and lived with his extended family until he married and moved to South Carolina was a plantation on Elk Marsh Run with cattle, crops that included tobacco, and woods where hickory and oak trees grew. This Bramlett Plantation was established by John’s grandfather Henry Bramlett Sr., a planter living in King George Co., Va., in 1735 when he purchased the land in Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va., from a man named John Ambrose. Ambrose also was a planter in King George County in 1735 when he sold half of his 500-acre tract of land in Prince William County to John Bramlett’s grandfather Henry Bramlett Sr., and then moved there to farm the adjoining tract. John Ambrose or his wife, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington, may be biologically or legally related by marriage to the Bramlett family. They were neighbors and Henry Bramlett Sr. witnessed Elizabeth's will. Official tax records allow us to track the three-generation Bramlett ownership of the Ambrose property. Henry Bramlett Sr., a planter and constable in 1752, died intestate. His eldest son, Henry Jr., inherited the 1735 land circa 1752-59 through primogeniture. When Henry Jr. also died intestate in 1780, his oldest son, Henry Bramlett III, inherited the land through primogeniture. Henry III was required to return to Virginia from his residence in Laurens Co., S. C., to claim it. A resurvey of the plantation, requested by Henry III after his father’s death, which was recorded in Fauquier County in 1780 with an accompanying plat map, documents John’s connection to the land and thus to his father, Henry Jr., and two elder brothers, Reuben and Henry III. The 1780 resurvey record mentions John and his brother Reuben (Revolutionary War soldier in Virginia 1777-1781, who later settled and died in Gallatin Co., Ill.) as chain carriers on the resurvey, their brother Henry III as the current owner of the land, and their deceased father, “Henry Bramblett,” as the former owner:
Northern Neck of Virginia. Lord Proprietor’s Office.To Mr. John Moffett--Whereas Henry Bramblett [III] of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain Tract of Land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by Estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett [Jr.], Father of Henry [III] aforesaid, which said Henry (the Father) [Jr.] died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing & affixing at the Court House of Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no Person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett [III]. And the said Henry Bramblett [III] desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees. These are therefore to empower you to resurvey the said Land for the said Henry Bramblett [III] A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin Plat Map of Henry Bramblett’s [III] Land Area 231 Acres By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietors office to me Directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblett [III], of South Carolina, a tract of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the Property of A Henry Bramblett [Jr.] father to the aforesaid Henry [III]; who dying a suicide, the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at a white oak corner to Jonas Williams, thence along the said Williams’s Line, S 31 E 60 Poles to B two Hicories, thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two Small hicories, thence N 35 1/2 W 21 6 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & Sundry saplings, thence S 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G 2 small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning. Containing 231 Acres. Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett Chain Carriers J. Moffitt 20th Nov.r 1780


The above record is the only recorded documentation found for the biological connection between brothers John, Reuben and Henry III and their father, Henry Jr. Close family members or neighbors traditionally participated as chain carriers in land surveys since they knew boundaries best and were in a position to protect the landowner’s (their relative’s or neighbor’s) interests. The original Bramlett deed for Henry Sr. lists the property as 250 acres, but the new deed and plat map from the resurvey for his grandson Henry III contained only 231 acres.


Henry Bramlett III's plat map of his father's former Bramlett Plantation on Elk Marsh Run


Map of Hamilton Parish where John and siblings grew up on Bramlett Plantation in Fauquier Co., Va.

   John and his brother Reuben are named together in another separate Fauquier County land record in 1780. “John Bramblett” and “Ruben Bramblett” served as chain carriers for a Nov. 1, 1780, survey of wasteland or ungranted land which was requested by Robert Henson of Fauquier County:
By Virtue of a warrant from the Proprietor’s office, to me directed I have Surveyed for Robert Hinson of Fauquier County, a Tract of Waste Land adjoining the Lands of Jennings, Bramblett, & Dodd near the head of Ratcliff’s Branch, in the said County, Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at A a white Oak & Black Oak by a glade corner to Bramblett, thence along the said Bramblett’s Line S 49 E 132 Poles to B two small hicories in Jennings’s line, thence along the said Line--S 61 W 20 Poles to C a hicory sapling, thence N 30 W 3 Poles to D a hicory & fallen Red Oak Corner to Dodd, thence binding along the said Dodd’s lines N 47 W 66 Poles to E a Large Hicory stump & small white Oak by the road, thence N 42 W 59 1/2 Poles to F a box Oak by the said Road, thence N 37 E 9 Poles to the Beginning, Containing 12 1/2 acres. Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett Chain CarriersJ. Moffett 1st Nov.r 1780.
Robert Henson may be a relative by marriage, or Reuben and John were designated chain carriers because they were qualified and neighbors living right next to the Henson land according to the plat map.
   John is identified as the brother of Reuben Bramlett of Illinois by Meeks Haley Bramlet in his 1924 history A Pioneer Family - Bramlet while providing information about J. Mims Bramlett, a descendant of John: “J. Mims Bramlet resides at 2013 Portner Place, N. W., in Washington, D. C. He has lived in Washington about twenty-five years....His father was Robert H. Bramlet, whose brothers were Turner, Joe and Nathaniel. Their father was Reuben Bramlet, whose brothers were Elias and Nathaniel. Their father was John Bramlet, who went to Greenville County, South Carolina, from Fauquier County, Virginia....Most of his relatives live in South Carolina. John was a brother to Reuben Bramlet, who was head of the Illinois branch of the family...” (96).
John and Mary’s Marriage in Virginia
   John married Mary Peak in Fauquier Co., Va., circa 1783. No marriage record has been found for them since their parish records are lost and marriages were not routinely recorded until after the American Revolution; however, John’s 1855 obituary in The Southern Christian Advocate indicates John and Mary had been married seventy years when Mary died in 1853. Their Bramlett Bible, once owned by John’s son Reuben, lists Mary as the “wife of John Bramlett” and records her birth date as May 16, 1763. Her grave marker in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, which she shares with John and daughter Susan, identifies her as “Mary Peak,” wife of John Bramlett, and is inscribed with her full birth and death dates. Peak/e researchers determined that Mary’s parents probably are Barbara Thorne or Carter who died in 1816 and William Peak/e, born in 1725 and died in 1816. Mary was born in Fauquier Co., Va., where one William Peak/e bought land on June 3, 1767 (DB-2:669). Mary died at age 90 on June 25, 1853, according to the inscription on the grave marker and in her son’s Bible, most likely at home in Greenville County.
John and Mary’s Life in South Carolina
   After moving from Virginia, John and Mary first lived in Laurens County in South Carolina. Their first child, William, was born in South Carolina in 1786; and William and family are enumerated in the 1790 Laurens County census. “John Bramlett,” free white male 16 years and over, is listed in 1790 U. S. Census for Laurens Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes two free white males under age 16 (sons William and Nathan) and three free white females (wife, Mary, and two daughters: Margaret and Nancy) (NARA Film M637:11:446). (Several other family members, including John's mother, Margaret, and brother Nathan lived nearby.) Laurens County deeds also place John Bramlett in the area in 1791. John and his brother Nathan signed as witnesses on a deed in May that year when their widowed mother, Margaret, of Laurens County bought fifty acres of land on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River from Ezekiel Griffith (DB-D:5). John and Nathan also witnessed a deed on May 10, 1791, when Griffith sold some land on Beaverdam Creek to William Stone (DB-F:220).
   By 1799 John and Mary were living in Greenville County where he became a prosperous farmer and prominent religious and community leader. Although members of the core group of John and Mary’s church--Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church--were holding religious meetings in their homes in Greenville District by 1799, the church was formally organized on Monday, Oct. 19, 1801. The organizational meeting and a quarterly meeting were held at John Bramlett’s house, ten miles southeast of Greenville. After the church was established in 1799, a house of worship was then constructed by 1801, and land was transferred to secure the existing church building. John in 1811 donated four acres of land “beginning on a Maple in a branch turning 212 yards South to a black Jack thence 91 yards East to a black Jack thence N215 yards to a White Oak thence 110 to the Maple where we started” to the trustees of Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church. “John Bramlet of the District of Greenville, S. C.,” transferred the property to “Solomon Holland, John Bramlet [himself], William Bramlet, Nathan Bramlet & Derix Yeargin, trustees,” for the use of the church on Sept. 18, 1811. The deed was later recorded in Greenville District on March 28, 1836 (DB-S:104). The trustees William Bramlet and Nathan Bramlet are John’s sons, at that time aged 25 and 22 respectively. William later became a local Methodist Minister in 1820 and served a congregation at Jackson Grove, S. C. Nathan in the late 1830s was involved in the founding and development of Hopewell Methodist Episcopal Church after he and his family had settled near Murrayville, Hall Co., Ga. (Nathan and William are not to be confused with their Uncle Nathan Bramlett and Great-Uncle William Bramblett. Uncle Nathan, brother of John Bramlett, did not live in Greenville District in 1811--he lived in Laurens District and was a founding member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church. Great-Uncle William Bramblett, John’s uncle, the brother of Henry Bramlett Jr., was not living in 1811. He had been a resident of Laurens District until he died in or before 1787; and, according to Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt's Diary, William and his family also were early members of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church there.) The first church building was a log structure built on poles.

   Sundry Citizens petitioned to incorporate Bethel Methodist Church of Greenville Dist., S. C., including R. H. Bramlett, J. W. Burditt, Jesse Burditt, Reuben C. Burditt, Thomas Garrett, B. Holland, W. T. Ashmore, William L. M. Austin, several others. Petition not dated, courtesy South Carolina Dept. of Archives and History (Record S165015).

John and Mary in Census Data
   John is included as head of a family in the 1800 U. S. Census for Greenville District but perhaps not in 1810 (the census taker may have missed them). John and Mary and family also are listed or enumerated in 1820-1850 census records. “John Bramblet,” 26-44, is listed in the 1800 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., as head of family 1404 which includes a female 26-44 (wife, Mary), and ten children: one female 10-16, born 1784-1790 (Margaret); two males 10-16, born 1784-1790 (William, Nathan); five females under 10, born 1790-1800 (Nancy, Alcey, Milley, Rosanah/Rosa/Rosey, Mary) and two males under 10, born 1790-1800 (Reuben, John Wesley) (NARA Film M32:47:280A). “John Bramlet,” white male 45 and over, born before 1775, engaged in agriculture, is listed in the 1820 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S .C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over, born before 1775 (wife, Mary) and another female 45 and over (sister? sister-in-law?), six children and perhaps two daughters-in-law and three grandchildren: two females 26-44, born between 1776 and 1794 (daughters-in-law Sarah Dacus and Elizabeth Griffith? or daughter Milley?); one female 16-25, born between 1795 and 1804 (daughter Rosa? or Mary?); two females 10-15, born 1804-1810 (daughter Susan and a granddaughter Mary?); two males 26-44, born between 1766 and 1794 (Reuben and John Wesley); two males 16-25, born between 1795 and 1804 (Henry); one male 10-15, born between 1805 and 1810 (Elias); and two males under 10, born between 1811 and 1820 (grandsons Thomas W. and Josiah?) (NARA Film M33:120:160).
   “John Bramlet,” 60-69, is listed in the 1830 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes a female 60-69 (wife, Mary), four children and perhaps some grandchildren: one female 40-49, born between 1781 and 1790 (daughter Margaret?); two females 15-19, born between 1811 and 1815, mismarked? (daughter Susan, who never married, and daughter Mary?); one male 20-29, born between 1801 and 1810 (Elias); and four younger people who could be grandchildren: one female 10-14, born between 1816 and 1820; one female 5-9, born between 1821 and 1825; one male 15-19, born between 1811 and 1815 (Nathan, son of William?); and one male 10-14, born between 1816 and 1820 (Abner G., son of William?) (NARA Film M19:172:284). Some or all of these younger people may be children of Nancy S. Dacus and William Bramlett, John and Mary’s daughter-in-law and son, who lived near them. The grandchildren may have been helping their grandfather--then age 66--farm his land.

   “John Bramblett,” 70-80, is listed in the 1840 U. S. Census for Greenville Dist., S. C., as head of a family that includes a female 70-80 (wife, Mary), and one female 30-40, born between 1800 and 1810 (daughter Susan who did not marry) (NARA Film M704:512:200). “John Bramblett,” 86, blind, and wife, Mary, 87, both born in Virginia, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., with one grown child: daughter Susana, 45, born in South Carolina (NARA Film M432:853:458B). “John Bramblett” also is listed in the Nov. 30, 1850, Agricultural Census for Greenville Co., S. C., with fifty improved acres and fifty unimproved acres worth $1,000 and $246 worth of livestock (SCDAH Film M2:1:781-782).
John’s Obituary
   John’s obituary, written by Dr. W. L. M. Austin, a member of Bethel Methodist Church, appears in the Oct. 25, 1855, edition of the Southern Christian Advocate:
Died, at his residence, “on the hill,” near the Bethel Camp ground, Greenville Dist., S. C., July 27th, John Bramlett, aged 91 years. The venerable patriarch has gone to his reward. The old christian who for more than 73 years “had the witness that he pleased God”—who was always ready to join the worshippers in the house of prayer, the very picture of an aged saint, now mingles with angels and adores the Redeemer in Heaven. Father Bramlett was born in Fauquier co., Va., May 13th, 1764. [His grave marker and the Bible record say May 15.] In his 18th year, [1782] he joined the Methodists, and one year afterwards, while conducting family devotion at the house of his widowed mother, he was powerfully converted. From the hour of regeneration until the angels escorted him to heaven, during a very long life of temptation and trial, he maintained his confidence in Christ, and to use his own words “never lost the witness.” All who knew John Bramlett believed in him. A more heavenly minded man, the writer never knew. Shortly after his conversion, he married and removed to S. C. where he passed 70 years of his life, universally respected. A generous, whole-souled and devoted follower of the Saviour, he never disgraced the church by the exhibition of an unworthy spirit. Full of faith, he gave glory to God,—full of love, he cared for his neighbor. God was his Father, heaven his home,—he knew that, and was happy. What Methodist minister ever visited Greenville circuit, and did not admire and love Father Bramlett? Always at his place in church, until his infirmities made it impossible, how hearty and sincere was his worship! O! it was refreshing to see the dear old man, in church. He entered into the services with his whole heart—tears of love and joy flowing from his dimmed eyes, and expressions of gratitude and rapture falling from his lips. To see that white haired disciple, blind, and trembling with the weight of 90 years, so hopeful and so happy, was a privilege and a benefit. He was the founder of the church at Bethel,—the class for many years meeting at his house for worship. Bishop Asbury and the preachers of the olden times, who passed through this part of the State, preached and rested under his roof. Father Bramlett brought up a family of 13 children, all of whom lived to become parents, [except one - Susan never married] and all joined the church of their father and mother. One year before Father Bramlett’s death, his aged consort was taken from his side. She too was 91 at the time of her death, having been for 70 years, his faithful and pious companion. Permit me, to tell you of the old patriarch’s "bower of prayer" before concluding this imperfect sketch. He had a place, a sheltered and retired spot, where he used to pray. When he was blind and extremely feeble, it was most affecting to see him groping his way to his loved retreat. There, he prayed and sang and rejoiced, communing with his God every day. He waited for death as for the coming of his best friend, and passed away, at the very time he would have chosen to go, when the Camp ground, a few hundred yards from his house, was filled with his neighbors and acquaintances, praising God. W. L. M. Austin. (SCA, Vol. 19, No. 21, p. 84, col. 2)

Camp meetings became an annual tradition during the early 1800s when outdoor religious services were held in a large brush arbor constructed on four acres of land beside Bethel Church. The arbor itself was constructed of hand-hewn logs and benches. It was first covered with brush and branches and much later covered with shingles. Church trustees and members petitioned the South Carolina General Assembly to incorporate Bethel Church and Arbor and Camp Ground. Among the many who signed the undated petition are Jesse Burdett, R. H. (Robert Hugh/Hulet) Bramlett, Reuben F. Burditt, J. W. Burdett, James Bramlett, Wm. L. M. Austin (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S165015).

   John and Mary’s children and others in the community attended Bethel School, first a one-room log structure constructed near the church. Later in 1916 the church constructed a two-room frame school building. Today 966 students attend the K-5 award-winning, wifi-enabled, two-story facility known as Bethel Elementary. The school, staffed with about 100 administrative, professional teaching and support employees, is shown above.
John and Mary’s Children
   The names and birth dates of John and Mary and children are inscribed in their son Elias Bramlett’s Bible and in Reuben Bramlett’s Bible, the latter which was once in the possession of Robert Hulet/Hugh Bramlett, grandson of John and Mary, and later passed down to Robert’s son H. Marvin Bramlett and then to his son Robert Austin Bramlett. John and Mary’s children are William, Margaret, Nathan, Nancy, Reuben, Alcey, John Wesley, Mildred ("Milley"), Rosanah (“Rosey” “Rosa”), Mary, Henry, Susannah (“Susan”) and Elias Bramlett. Several of the children appear to be namesakes of John’s extended family members: William, named after John’s brother? and/or uncle; Margaret, named after John’s mother; Nathan and Reuben and Henry, named after John’s brothers Nathan, Reuben and Henry; and perhaps Nancy, named after a probable sister of John. John Wesley Bramlett was named in part after John and after the famous Methodist leader John Wesley. Mary was named after her mother. The other daughters--Alcey, Milley, Rosanah “Rosey” “Rosa” and Susannah “Susan”--may have been named after some of John’s sisters who have not been documented and/or after some of Mary’s family.
Works Cited for John Bramlett and Bramlett and Bethel Churches
Asbury, Rev. Francis. The Journal of the Rev. Francis Asbury, Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal church. New York: The Methodist Episcopal Church, N. Bangs and T. Mason, 1821. p. 40. 1801 references to Widow (Margaret) Bramblet, Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church, and reference to (Margaret's son) John Bramblet, regarding Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church: https://archive.org/stream/
--. The Journal. The Methodist Episcopal Church. p. 86. 1802 references to Nathan Bramblet, Bramlett Church -- “Bramblet's Chapel”: https://archive.org/stream/00612616.874.emory.edu/006 12616_874#page/n87/mode/2up.

Rev. William Bramlett and Nancy S. Dacus
Descendant James T. Hammond of Columbia, S. C., provides much of the following about Rev. William Bramlett.

   Rev. William Bramlett, first child of John and Mary (Peak) Bramlett, was born July 2, 1786, in Laurens Co., S. C. William’s birth and death dates are inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by William’s brother Reuben. William died July 29, 1870, at home in Jackson Grove, Greenville Co., S. C., and was buried in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery. William’s son-in-law Willis Rogers petitioned to be administrator of William’s estate on Jan. 28, 1871 (Apt. 32, File 56). William’s son John W. Bramlett and William’s widow, Nancy, bought most of William’s property at the estate sale, according to descendant James T. Hammond.
  
William’s tombstone: “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept the faith. Henceforth There is laid up for me The crown of righteousness which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day.”
William and Nancy's Life
   William was appointed trustee of Jackson Grove Methodist Church in 1835. He previously was a charter member and trustee of Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church near Simpsonville, S. C. J. C. Crisp identifies William as a Methodist minister in an obituary published in the Sept. 23, 1870, issue of The Southern Christian Advocate:
Rev. William Bramlett, a local minister of the M. E. Church, South, departed this life at his own residence, in Greenville co., S. C., on the 29th July, 1870. Brother Bramlett was born July 2d, 1786. For 70 years, lacking 6 months, he had been a most consistent member of the M. E. Church, and a local preacher about 50 years. Sometimes employed by P. Elder to supply pastoral charge; always abundant in labors. The church he truly loved, and for the promotion of the Redeemer’s kingdom, he most faithfully labored for three score and ten years, till called from the church militant “to the general assembly and church of the first-born, which are written in heaven.” His last words were: “I am happy! happy! happy!” [signed] J. C. Crisp. The Christian Neighbor will please copy. (vol. 33, p. 152, col. 4)
Bramlett descendant Julien Potter Wooten in his 1886 brief family history named William as a son of John and Mary. Julien described William as “a Methodist preacher” who “lived and died in Greenville, S. C.”
   Methodist Church historian Samuel M. Green in An Historical Outline of Greenville Circuit writes about William Bramlett who lived in the upper part of Greenville County near Batesville and preached at Ebenezer Methodist Church. He indicates William assisted the Rev. Thomas Hutchings, “a Methodist local preacher...who was the original proprietor of the Batesville cotton factory. Through their efforts, church meetings were held for workers and proprietors of the Batesville and Pelham cotton factories” (10). (Batesville and Pelham originally were known as Buena Vista.) Buried in the cemetery at Ebenezer Methodist Church, where William H. Bramlett preached, are Arthur Bramlett (1), and Lilla Mae Bramlett (2), according to Beverly T. Whitmire in Presence of The Past. Their graves apparently are not marked or the markers have no dates. Their connection to William is unknown.
   William married Nancy S. Dacus in 1803 in Greenville County, according to descendant Louise (Hutchings) Galway. She reported Nancy was born May 16, 1788, in Virginia. Nancy most likely is the daughter of Nathaniel Dacus and his first wife, Martha Dupree, who married in Lunenburg Co., Va. Nancy died in Jackson Grove, S. C., on March 13, 1874. Her grave marker in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery identifies her as the wife of Rev. William Bramlett.
Census Data 
   “William Bramblet,” 26-44, is listed in the 1810 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes a female 26-44 (wife, Nancy) and two children: a female under 10, born 1800-10 (Mary?), and a male under 10, born 1800-10 (Nathan Robert/Josiah?) (NARA Film M252:62:118). “Wm. Bramlet,” white male 26-44, born between 1776 and 1794, employed in agriculture, is listed in the 1820 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., with a female 26-44 (wife, Nancy) and six children: one female 10-16, born between 1804 and 1810 (Mary); two males under 10, born between 1810 and 1820 (Nathan Robert/Josiah? and/or Abner G., Tolliver Robert); and three females under 10, born between 1810 and 1820 (Margaret/Anna? and Elizabeth and Melanie “Mellie” “Milly”?) (NARA Film M33:120:169). One of the sons may have been missed by the census taker or may have been living with other relatives. Four young children, probably grandchildren--children of William and Nancy--are enumerated with William’s parents, John and Mary, in the 1820 census. Another son of William and Nancy, Elbert S., had died in 1819. William lived near his parents, John and Mary (Peak/e) Bramlett, in Greenville County in 1830. “William Bramlet,” 40-50, is listed in the 1830 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes a female 40-50 (wife, Nancy) and nine children: a female 20-30, born 1800-10 (Mary); two females 15-20, born 1811-15 (Elizabeth “Betsy” and Melanie “Mellie” “Milly”?); one female 10-15, born 1815-20 (Margaret/Anna?); one male 10-15, born 1815-20 (Tolliver Robert); one female 5-10, born 1820-25 (Martha); one male 5-10, born 1820-25 (William H.); one female under 5, born 1825-30 (Eliza W.); and one male under 5, born between 1825 and 1830 (John Wesley Ervin) (NARA Film M19:172:284). Sons Nathan Robert/Josiah and Abner G. may have been living with relatives: their grandparents John and Mary (Peak) Bramlett have one male 15-20, born between 1810 and 1815 (Nathan?); and one male 10-15, born between 1815 and 1820 (Abner G.?) in their house in the 1830 census.
   Nathan Bramlett married Mary Margaret Miles by 1835, and Abner G. Bramlett married Elizabeth Rosa Hawkins in 1843. Two of Nancy and William’s three older daughters (Mary and/or Margaret/Anna and Melanie “Mellie” “Milly”?) married before 1840. William and Nancy’s son Tolliver Robert Bramlett married before 1840 and lived next to them.
   “Rev. Wm. Bramblett,” 50-60, born 1780-90, is listed in the 1840 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes a female 50-60 (wife, Nancy) and eight children: one male 20-30, born 1810-20 (Abner G.); two females 20-30, born 1810-20 (Margaret/Anna? or Melanie “Mellie” “Milly”? and Elizabeth “Betsy”); one female 15-20, born 1820-25 (Martha); one male 15-20, born 1820-25 (William H.); one female 10-15, born 1825-30 (Eliza W.); one male 10-15, born 1825-30 (John Wesley Ervin); and one female 5-10, born 1830-35 (Malinda Caroline) (NARA Film M704:512:205). (Nathan does not appear with his parents and siblings in 1840 because he married by 1835 and lived elsewhere. Abner did not marry until 1843.) “William Bramblett,” 64, born in South Carolina, farmer, $300 real estate, and wife, Nancy, 62, born in Virginia, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., with six grown children: Elizabeth (“Betsy”), 30; Martha, 28; William (H.), 25, laborer; Eliza (W.), 23; John (Wesley Ervin), 21, laborer; and (Malinda) Caroline, 18 (NARA Film M432:853:367A). “Wm. Bramblett” is listed in the Sept. 6, 1850, Agricultural Census for Greenville Co., S. C., with fifty improved acres and fifty-five unimproved acres worth $300 and $200 worth of livestock (SCDAH Film M2:1:734-735). William Bramlett circa 1855 signed a petition to erect a gate on the road from Greenville Courthouse (SCDAH Series S165015, Item 31). Other signers include William H. Bramlett Jr., John W. Bramlett, William Few. “William Bramlett,” 74, born in South Carolina, Methodist clergyman, $1,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, and wife, Nancy, 72, born in Virginia, housekeeper, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Mush Creek P.O., Head of Tyger Div., Greenville Co., S. C., with three grown children born in South Carolina: Elizabeth Bramlett, 48, seamstress; Martha Bramlett, 41, seamstress; and Eliza Miles, 32, housekeeper, $1,600 personal estate (NARA Film M653:1220:506). Also listed is Eliza’s son John T. Miles, 5. “W. [William] Bramlett,” 84, and wife, Nancy, 82, keeping house, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Mush Creek P.O., Highland Township, Greenville Co., S. C. (NARA Film M593:1498:675B).
   William and Nancy’s children are Mary, Nathan Robert (Josiah?), Abner G., Elizabeth (“Betsy”), Melanie (“Mellie” “Milly”), Margaret Anna, Elbert S. (Sevier?), Tolliver Robert, Martha, William H. (Henry?), Eliza W., John Wesley Ervin and Malinda Caroline Bramlett.
Few and Bramlett Family
   At least two of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William Bramlett's daughters married Fews who descend from immigrant ancestors who left England for America in the late 17th century. Mary Bramlett married Benjamin Few, and Elizabeth Bramlett married Ephraim L. Few of Greenville Co., S. C. The Few family of America is documented by Florence Knight Fruth in her 1977 history Some Descendants of Richard Few of Chester County, Pennsylvania and Allied Lines, 1692-1976 (Parsons, W. Va.: McClain Printing, 1977). Fruth named the immigrant ancestors of the Greenville County, S. C., Fews as Richard Few (1625-1688), a Quaker shoemaker, and his second wife, Julian, and children, all born England. They settled on 225 acres and owned a Philadelphia city lot in William Penn's Colony, now in Chester Co., Pa. Richard Few wrote his will on June 12, 1686, and died Sept. 13, 1688. The will was proved March 26, 1688 (WB-1A-59:134-135). Fruth names Richard Few's first wife and mother of some of his children as Jane Whitfield Few, who was born in England and died there. Fruth also features in her history James Few, one of the most well-known and venerated American Few family members and the direct ancestor of the husbands of the Bramlett daughters. James Few, born circa 1746 at Three Sisters Plantation, Baltimore Co., Md., is a son of Mary Wheeler and William Few and grandson of the immigrant Richard Few. 
   James Few is venerated by family members and local historians as an American hero and martyr who died May 16, 1771, at the Battle of Alamance Creek, Orange (now Alamance) Co., N. C., which preceded our Revolutionary War in 1776. Departing from a longtime historical Quaker tradition of peaceful but persistent resistance, James Few decided to fight, joined the rising revolt against British political and social control--lack of representation and increasing demands for high taxes. James Few became known to local British troops and the Crown in England as an "outlaw Regulator" due to his outspoken, visible leadership of the group, which first comprised small farmers from several counties. After James and forty others were charged in England as traitors for opposition to the Crown, North Carolina Governor William Tryon targeted the Regulators by leading troops toward their Alamance Creek camp. Tryon's report and historians documented the events of the ensuing battle. Tryon attacked during ongoing negotiations, killing a Regulator negotiator, and ordered his troops to move in and fire upon and massacre the other members of the group. He hanged James Few in front of his cheering army. Thus the struggle for liberty and freedom began at the Battle of Alamance Creek, near present-day Burlington, N. C., and James Few became a martyr of the cause of American Independence. After his death, James's family--wife, Sarah Wood Few, and twin children--moved to St. Paul Parish, Ga., with James's father to escape further British attacks. Sarah Wood Few later moved to Greenville Co., S. C., with her son. She died there in 1804 and rests in Old Few Chapel Cemetery. James and Sarah's daughter, Sarah Few, born Feb. 9, 1771, in Orange Co., N. C., married John Garvin and died about July 30, 1855, near Augusta, Ga., where she is buried in Magnolia Cemetery. James and Sarah's son, William Few, born Feb. 9, 1771, in Orange Co., N. C., settled in Greenville Co., S. C., and died there June 12, 1856. He first married Susannah Tubbs. He and his children and second wife, Nancy Chastain, established and founded Few Chapel and Few Family Cemetery, Greer, S. C., where they and descendants sleep in eternal rest. Both Benjamin Few and Ephraim Lawrence Few are buried there.


Few Family Cemetery, Greer, Greenville Co., S. C., courtesy Robin Farley Dixson


Descendant James T. Hammond of Greenville and Columbia, S. C., who provides genealogical information about the Greenville County Few family and others, descends from Fews and a long line of distinguished American antecedents, including Chastains, Bramblettes, Callaways, Dacuses, Wilsons, Barnettes and Hammonds to name only a...few.




   Mary Bramlett, first child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. She married Benjamin Few, son of William Few.


Descendant Cornelia K. Hudson of Tulsa, Okla., provided some of the following.
   Nathan Robert (Josiah?) Bramlett, second child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born circa 1808 in Greenville Co., S. C. He died of yellow fever at Memphis, Tenn., and was buried in a cemeter/*y in West Memphis, Ark., reportedly with an inscribed tombstone. A Methodist minister, Nathan was in Memphis on business during a yellow fever epidemic. He stayed to help and contracted the disease, which killed him. He married Mary Margaret Miles before 1835. She was born circa 1816 in North Carolina. Nathan and Margaret lived in Newberry Co., S. C., in 1850 before moving to Georgia and then Mississippi by 1860. "Nathaniel R. Bramlet," 38, born South Carolina, overseer, $1,500 real estate, and wife, Margaret F., 38, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Newberry Co., S. C., with seven children born South Carolina: Nancy A., 17; Mary L., 13; Henrietta E., 9; Martha L., 7; Susanna, 4; Permelia, 3; and Virginia C., 1 (NARA Film M432:856:253A-B). "Nathan R. Bramlett," 52, born South Carolina, farmer, $2,000 real estate, $500 personal estate, and wife, Margaret, 44, are listed in the 1860 U, S, Census for Div. 1, Houstton P. O., Chickasaw Co., Miss., with five grown and minor children born Georgia: Elizabeth, 18; Louisa, 16; Rosana, 14; Sarah, 13; Ella, 12, and three others born Alabama: R. C. Finly, 27; W. W. Finly, 14; and Virginia Finly, 9 (NARA Film M653:579:172). Nathan and Margaret's children include Nancy Caroline, Mary L., Henrietta Elizabeth ("Lizzie"), Martha Louisa, Rosana F. ("Rosa"), Sarah Susanna ("Anna"), Permelia Ella, Virginia C. ("Jennie") and Lula Lydia Bramlett.
   Nancy Caroline Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born Sept. 23, 1835, in South Carolina. She died May 7, 1904, in Mississippi and was buried in Wesley Chapel Cemetery near Houston. She married George Washington Boyd on March 6, 1851, in South Carolina. Their children are Judge John P., Mary, John Jessie, Robert and Dr. Wesley Boyd.
Judge John P. Boyd was born at French Camp, Miss. His children include Pearl Daniel, Mary Lee and a Daughter who was the wife of Polk Herndon.
   Mary L. Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born July 7, 1837, in South Carolina. She died April 24, 1891, in Van Vleet, Chickasaw Co., Miss., and was buried in Wesley Chapel Cemetery near Houston, Miss. She married Josiah Allen McDaniel at Houston, Miss. (Family research hints: The McDaniel family at one time used the surname McDonald. The family home was on the road to Pittsboro, Calhoun Co.. Miss. Josiah's sister and Rainwater Barnett had a child named Rita Shearer who lived at Houston, Miss.) Josiah Allen McDaniel served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted in Company D, Fifth Alabama and Mississippi Infantry, and was present with Gen. Robert E. Lee on April 9, 1865, at the surrender to Gen. Ullyses S. Grant at Appomattox. Mary and Josiah lived near Van Vleet. Their children include Nannie Elizabeth, Margaret ("Maggie"), Willie and Lula McDaniel.
   Nannie Elizabeth McDaniel, child of Mary L. Bramlett and Josiah Allen McDaniel, was born near Tampa, Fla., and died at age 1.
   Margaret "Maggie" McDaniel, child of Mary L. Bramlett and Josiah Allen McDaniel, was born in Mississippi. She died in 1892 and may have been buried at Asbury Chapel. She married Tom Downing and had five children: Van Hill, Ted, Mac, Muldrow and Molly Kay Downing.
   Willie McDaniel, child of Mary L. Bramlett and Josiah Allen McDaniel, was born in Mississippi. He died at age 1 year.
   Lula McDaniel, child of Mary L. Bramlett and Josiah Allen McDaniel, was born in Mississippi. She died at age 14 and was buried at Friendship Cemetery, Chickasaw Co., Miss.
   Henrietta Elizabeth "Lizzie" Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. She may be buried at Friendship Cemetery in Mississippi. She married a man named Smotherman.
   Martha Louisa Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born circa 1843 in South Carolina.
   Rosana F. "Rosa" Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born circa 1846 in South Carolina or Chickasaw Co., Miss. She died in Mississippi and was buried at Asbury Chapel near West Point, Miss. She married Walter Howard Brame and had seven children.
   Sarah Susanna "Anna" Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
   Permelia Ella Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
   Virginia C. "Jennie" Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. She died at the home of Emma Barnett on Thornton Hill, nine miles west of Okolona, Miss., and was buried at Wesley Chapel Cemetery near Houston, Miss. She married John Clark. Their child is Jennie Lee Clark. They lived in Louisville, Ky., at one time.
   Lula Lydia Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. She married someone named Young. They lived near Houlka, Miss.

   Abner G. Bramlett, third child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S. C. He married Rosa Hawkins, daughter of Polly and Ezekiel Hawkins.
   Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlett, fourth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born circa 1812 in Greenville Co., S. C. She died there in 1897. She married Ephraim Lawrence Few before 1838 in Greenville County. He was born in 1810 and died 1885. Their children are William Manning, Matilda Emaline, Laurence and Thomas Sidney Few.
   William Manning Few, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlett and Ephraim Lawrence Few, was born in 1838. He died in 1900 and was buried in Few Chapel United Methodist Church Cemetery. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He first married Eliza Elizabeth Bates on Jan. 1, 1859. Their child is Luella Florence Few. William second married Sarah A. Lucas Caldwell on Dec. 1, 1868. She was born in 1842. She died in 1914 and was buried in Few Chapel Cemetery. Their children are Charles B., John, Millie Emma, Amanda Louise and Willie Alma Few.
   Matilda Emaline Few, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlett and Ephraim Lawrence Few, was born in 1844. She died in 1915. She married Robert Thomason.
   Laurence Few, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlett and Ephraim Lawrence Few, was born in 1859. He died in 1863.
   Thomas Sidney Few, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Bramlett and Ephraim Lawrence Few, was born in 1864. He died in 1885.
   Melanie “Mellie” “Milly” Bramlett, fifth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S. C.
   Margaret Anna Bramlett, sixth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S. C.
   Elbert S. (Sevier) Bramlett, seventh child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S. C.
   Tolliver Robert Bramlett, eighth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S. C. He died in battle at Wilderness while serving as a soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He married Lauriet Neves.

   Martha Bramlett, ninth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S. C.

Descendant James T. Hammond provides much of the following about William H. Bramlett and wife, Rebecca, and family

   William H. (Henry?) Bramlett, tenth child of Rev. William and Nancy S. (Dacus) Bramlett, was born April 19, 1824, in Greenville Co., S. C. An entry in his Bramlett Bible, once in the possession of descendant Boyce Bramlett, indicates “W. H. Bramlett Departed this life Oct. 6th 1863 at 1/2 past 6 o’clock in the evening at the Ropers hospital in Charleston, S. C.” He died while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States, reportedly of typhoid fever. A soldier in his unit indicated in a letter the captain sent William back to Greenville County to be buried in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery where a grave is marked for him. (Victims of typhoid and other communicable diseases usually were buried right away in their uniforms at the place of death; however, there is no inscribed tombstone or burial record for him at Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston where deceased soldiers were interred.) A neighbor, James Irvin Willis, who served in William’s unit, Company H, Third Palmetto Battalion, South Carolina Light Artillery, mentions William in two letters he wrote to his father, Daniel Willis, and to his father and mother in 1863. The first letter, written March 6, 1863, from Camp James Island, S. C., contains a brief reference: “...Wm. Bramlett has come to our Co....” William had enlisted in February. Willis identifies their company at the bottom of the letter. He tells his father, “You directed your letter to Co. A. That was a mistake. Ours is Co. H.” An earlier reference near the top of the letter indicates the company had four artillery guns. William subsequently became ill and was hospitalized June 12, 1863. A second Willis letter, written Oct. 19, 1863, also from James Island, S. C., contains the news of William’s death: “There was one of my mess died of typhoid...his name was Wm. Bramlett...a neighbor of mine. Left a wife and five little children. He said before he died he was prepared...” and Captain McKendrick sent him home. The letters were preserved by Willis descendant Rev. J. Earnest Willis and published. The excerpts here are shared by Bramblette-Burdette-Willis descendant Franklin Donald Burdette of Florida.

William H. Bramlett served in the Confederacy during the War Between the States

Private William H. Bramlett 


Gone too soon...perished serving as a Confederate soldier in the Civil War

Portrait courtesy descendant James T. Hammond


Tombstone of William H. Bramlett and Rebecca Arvine Roe in Jackson Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery
   William married Rebecca Arvine Roe on Dec. 8, 1853, according to the Bramlett Bible. Rebecca was born Dec. 6, 1830, in Greenville District, the daughter of Ann Wheeler (1795-1846) and Thomas Roe (1791-1847). Rebecca died March 28, 1907, in Greenville County and was buried in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery. Her maternal grandparents are Phillis Biden and William Wheeler and her paternal grandparents are Elizabeth Daish (1769-1848) and James Roe Jr. (1766-1826). Rebecca Bramlett of Locust Hill, S. C., in 1901 is listed by Mann Batson in Upper Part of Greenville County, South Carolina, as one of the “Widows Of Soldiers Who Lost Their Lives In Service Of The Confederate States” (453).
   William wrote his last will and testament on Nov. 22, 1862, in Greenville District:
In the name of God Amen. I William H. Bramlett of the State of South Carolina, Greenville dist, being of sound and disposing mind and memory but knowing that it is appointed once for man to die and being desirous to dispose of the worldy goods wherewith it has pleased God to bless me do make and ordain this to be my last will in manner following--To wit--after the payment of my Just debts I will & bequeath unto my beloved wife Rebecca Bramlett all my estate both real and personal let it consist of whatsoever it may during her natural life or widowhood in case my wife shall marry I desire my estate divid[ed] between my wife & children that is to say I give to my wife one third part of my whole estate both real & personal to her & her heirs forever & the other two thirds I wish equally divided between my five children--Elbert Bramlett, John Bramlett, Nancy Bramlett, Charles Bramlett & William Bramlett all share & share alike to them & their heirs forever. I also desire that if my wife shall give birth to any other child or children by me I desire that such child or children shall share equally in my estate with my five children above named. I do hereby nominate & appoint my beloved wife Rebecca Bramlett Executrix of this my last will & testament in testimony whereof I do hereunto set my hand & affix my seal the 22nd day of November 1862--signed sealed published & declared as the last will & testament of the above named William Bramlett the day & date above written in the presence of J. L. Westmoreland, James W. Green, Martha V. Westmoreland. W. H. Bramlett
The witnesses and Rebecca (Roe) Bramlett appeared in court to prove the will on Nov. 16, 1863 (Apt. 22, File 26). Rebecca made a request to finalize a settlement of the estate on Feb. 2, 1870. The inventory of William’s estate, signed by his brothers-in-law Ignatius Few and Benjamin Few, indicates William had property valued at $1,833 and $67.74 in cash with $1,600.84 worth of “notes” at the time of his death. The county court was involved in settling the estate for about eight years after William died. Rebecca did not have any other children after William died: the five children named in his will--Elbert, John, Nancy, Charles and William--also are named as his heirs in Rebecca’s final report. The court set a date for a final hearing on the estate on March 3, 1870. At that time, the court appointed P. B. Benson guardian of the children.
   William H. and Rebecca are mentioned in Lou Alice F. Turner’s 1981 book Jackson Grove Methodist Church History as members of the church in 1835 (72).
   William is enumerated in his parents’ house in the 1830-1840 U. S. Census records for Greenville County. “William Bramblett,” 25, born in South Carolina, is listed there in the 1850 U. S. Census with his parents, William, 64, born South Carolina, and Nancy, 62, born in Virginia, and siblings (NARA Film M432:853:367B). William H. Bramlett was appointed guardian of his nephew, John Thomas Miles, son of Eliza Miles and minor heir of Thomas Miles, deceased, on Jan. 2, 1860, in Greenville District. Eliza Miles petitioned the court to appoint William guardian of her son. William lived near his parents close to Mush Creek in 1860: “William Bramlett Jr.,” 37, farmer, and wife, Rebecca (Arvine Roe), 28, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Tyger Division, Mush Creek P.O., Greenville Co., S. C., with four children born in South Carolina: Elbert (Sevier), 5; John (James), 4; Nancy (Arvine), 1/12; and Infant (Charles Proctor), 1/12 (NARA Film M653:1220:507A). Also listed is Samuel Singleton, 21, born in South Carolina, farmer. Another child, William H., was born in 1862 after the census.
   William enlisted as a private in Company H, 3rd (Palmetto) (White’s) Battalion, South Carolina Light Artillery, later known as Capt. William E. Earle’s Company, Horse Artillery, Butler’s Cavalry Division, on Feb. 13, 1863, in Greenville, S. C. The May-June company muster roll lists him as absent and in the hospital since June 12, 1863; and the September-October roll indicates he died at Roper Hospital, Charleston, S. C., on Oct. 6, 1863. “Wm. H. Bramlett, Pvt. Co. H. P.B.L.A. Vols. S. C.” who died in a Charleston, S. C., hospital “appears on a Register of Claims of Deceased Officers and Soldiers from South Carolina which were filed for settlement in the Office of the Confederate States Auditor for the War Department.” The claim was presented by Rebecca Bramlett, widow, on Jan. 23, 1864 (Confederate Archives, Chap. 10, File No. 33, p. 11). Rebecca claimed William’s personal effects and $55.50 in back pay on that day.
   Rebecca took courage and cared for her children, no doubt struggling to keep the farm and feed the family on her own in an economically and spiritually broken war-torn region for the next forty-four years. Rebecca Bramlett, 48, born in South Carolina to parents born in England, widowed, keeping house, is listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Bates Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with two grown children born in South Carolina: Charles P. (Proctor), 20, farmer, and William H., 18, works on farm (NARA Film T9:1231:381B). Rebecca Bramlett, 69, born in December 1830 in South Carolina to parents born in England, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Bates Township, Greenville Co., S. C., living with her son, W. H. Bramlett, 38, born in March 1862, widowed, farmer, and his son, Walter, 8, born in August 1891, both born in South Carolina to parents born there (NARA Film T623:1529:55A).
   William’s will names his five children: Elbert Sevier, John James, Nancy Arvine, Charles Proctor and William Henry Bramlett. Birth dates for all five children are inscribed in William Bramlett’s Bible.
  
   Elbert Sevier "E. S." Bramlett, first child of William H. and Rebecca Arvin (Roe) Bramlett, was born Sept. 1, 1854, in Greenville Co., S. C. He is a namesake of his Uncle Elbert S. Bramlett (1816-1819). Elbert died in Greenville County on May 12, 1918, and was buried in Lima Baptist Church Cemetery, north of Greenville, S. C. Elbert’s probate records indicate his son Willie C. Bramlett served as executor of his estate in 1918. Elbert was a farmer. He married Mary Elizabeth Trammell circa 1878. She was born July 22, 1846. She died April 18, 1907, and was buried in Lima Baptist Church Cemetery. “Elbert Bramlett,” 26, farmer, and wife, Lizzie, 34, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Saluda Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with one child: William, 1 (NARA Film T9:1231:352A). All were born in South Carolina. “Elbert S. Bramlett,” 45, born in September 1854 in South Carolina, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, married twenty-two years, and wife, Elizziebeath, 42, born in July 1847 in South Carolina, mother of five living children, are listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Saluda Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with five children born in South Carolina: William C., 20, born in July 1879, farm laborer; Mary E., 19, April 1881; Charley H., 16, July 1883, farm laborer; Emma E., 14, September 1885; and Lewis E., 12, October 1887, farm laborer (NARA Film T623:1530:267A). “Elbert S. Bramlett,” 56, salesman, general merchandise, widowed, and four children are listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for Saluda Township, Greenville Co., S. C.: William C., 30, farmer, general farm; Mary E., 28; Emer E., 24, daughter; and Louis E., 22, farmer, general farm (NARA Film T624:1461:148A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Elbert and Elizabeth’s children are William Claybourne (“Willie”), Mary Elizabeth, Charles Henry, Emmie Estill and Lewis Ervin Bramlett.




   John James Bramlette, second child of William H. and Rebecca (Roe) Bramlett, was born Aug. 28, 1856, in Greenville Co., S. C. He died there June 29, 1928, after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage, and was buried the next day in Jackson Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery, Traveler's Rest.
   John married Lucinda Gilreath, daughter of Martha Few (1823-1878) and William Henry Gilreath (1823-1881), on Nov. 9, 1876, in Greenville County. Her maternal grandparents are Nancy Chastain (1789-1850) and William Few (1771-1856) and her paternal grandparents are Nancy Harriet Green (1795-1867) and Hardy Jones Gilreath (1788-1868). Lucinda was born Nov. 20, 1856, in Greenville District. She died in Jackson Grove, S. C., on May 20, 1900, and was buried in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery.
   John was a farmer and worked in or owned a cotton mill in O’Neal Township. He was a Methodist. “John J. Bramlett,” 24, farmer, and wife, Lucindy, 24, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with two children: Nancy, 4, and Elizabeth, 2/12 (NARA Film T9:1231:286A). All were born in South Carolina. “John J. Bramlet,” 43, born in August 1856, cotton mill, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Piedmont, Grove Township, Greenville Co., S. C., as head of a family with five children born in South Carolina: Nannie, 22, born in August 1878, cotton mill; Clarence, 16, July 1884; Walter, 13, July 1886, cotton mill; Clara Belle, 4, February 1896; and Bettie (Bramlett) Gillespie, 20, April 1880, mother of one child, none living (NARA Film T623:1530:149A). Also listed: Bettie’s husband, William Gillespie, 31, born in June 1868, cotton mill, married two years. “John J. Bramlett,” 63, father, widowed, farmer, is listed in the 1920 U. S. Census for Highland Township, Greenville Co., S. C., living with his son James C. (Clarence) Bramlett, 35, farmer, general farm, head of the family, and his wife, Allie, 20, and their two children (NARA Film T625:1698:297A). Also listed: John’s daughter Clara B. Bramlett, 24, sister.
   John and Lucinda’s children are Nancy (“Nannie”), Elizabeth (“Bettie”), James Clarence, George Walter and Clara Bell Bramlette.

 John James Bramlette and family circa 1896. From left: John James Bramlette, sons George W. and James Clarence and wife Lucinda Gilreath Bramlette holding baby Clara Bell, and standing, from left: daughters Nancy and Elizabeth. Photo courtesy of James T. Hammond

Nancy Arvine Bramlett, third child of William H. and Rebecca Arvine (Roe) Bramlett, was born Sept. 13, 1858, in Greenville Co., S. C. She died May 28, 1925, in Greenville County and was buried in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery. Her grave marker lists her birth and death dates and identifies her as Nancy Bramlett, wife of G. Walker Gilreath.

Nancy Arvine Bramlette and unidentified child in or before 1925, courtesy James T. Hammond 
   The Rev. John Dill performed the marriage ceremony for Nancy and G. Walker Gilreath on Jan. 17, 1878, in Travelers Rest, S. C. Walker was born April 20, 1857, the son of Martha Few and William Henry Gilreath. He died Dec. 17, 1925, and was buried beside Nancy in Mountain View Cemetery. “Nancy Gilreath,” 21, and husband, Walker, 23, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with one child: Nora, 10/12, born in August (NARA Film T9:1231:281B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Nancy E. Gilreath,” 41, born in September 1858, mother of six living children, married twenty-two years, and husband, George W., 43, born in April 1857, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with six children: Norah R., 20, August 1879; William H., 18, September 1881; Ida M., 16, September 1883; Brannard, 14, April 1886; Brinnie, 14, April 1886; and Lula B., 2, June 1897 (NARA Film T623:1530:219A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Nancy A. Gilreath,” 51, married thirty-two years, and husband, George W., 56, farmer, general farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with three children: Brinnie, 24; Lula B., 12; and Fannie/Thannie V., 8 (NARA Film T624:1461:103B). Their son William H. and wife, Lura Nora, lived next door. All were born in South Carolina. Walker and Nancy’s children are Nora Rebecca, William Henry, Ida Mae, twins Brannard and Brinnie, Lula Beatrice and Thannie/Fannie Vannoy Gilreath.
   Charles Proctor Bramlett, fourth child of William H. and Rebecca (Roe) Bramlett, was born May 6, 1860, in Jackson Grove, S. C. He died Oct. 2, 1912, in Locust Hill, Greenville Co., S. C., and was buried in Mush Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. Charles was a farmer, carpenter, deacon and church historian. He built Mush Creek Baptist Church before his marriage and constructed several houses in upper Greenville County, including one for his own family circa 1900. He worked at Shumate’s Cabinet shop in Greenville in the early 1900s and later operated a sawmill at the foot of Paris Mountain, according to his granddaughter Elizabeth E. Nicholl. Charles married Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” Neves on Dec. 26, 1889, in Mush Creek community. She was born there Feb. 28, 1871, the daughter of Frances E. Boswell and William Perry Zachariah Franklin Neves. Lizzie died March 24, 1967, in Greenville and was buried in Mush Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. She worked as a supervisor for Nuckasee Manufacturing in Greenville. “Charlie Bramlett,” 40, born in May 1860, married ten years, and wife, Lizzie, 28, born in February 1872, mother of two living children, are listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with two children: Alice, 9, born September 1890, and Cora, 7, born April 1893 (NARA Film T623:1530:225A). “Charles P. Bramlette,” 49, first marriage, married twenty years, farmer, rents farm, and wife, Mary E., 38, born in February 1872, mother of two living children, are listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with two grown children: Alice, 19, and Cora, 17 (NARA Film T624:1461:104B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Lizzie Bramlett,” 48, is listed in the 1920 U. S. Census for San Soucie Village, Greenville, Greenville Co., S. C., with daughter Cora Nicoll, 28, and son-in-law Earnest E., 33, and their two children (NARA Film T625:1698:162B). All were born in South Carolina. Charles and Elizabeth’s children are Alice Irene and Cora Pauline Bramlett.
   William Henry Bramlett, fifth child of William H. and Rebecca (Roe) Bramlett, was born March 31, 1862, in Jackson Grove, S. C. He died May 24, 1930, and was buried in Roby Cemetery, Roby, Fisher Co., Tex. William was a farmer. He married Ida Estelle Neves/Neaves, daughter of Nancy Jane Chastain and Washington Neves, on Nov. 2, 1890, in Greenville County. Ida was born March 19, 1865, in Greenville County. She died Feb. 6, 1892, and was buried in Few’s Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery. “W. H. Bramlett,” 38, born in November 1862 in South Carolina to parents born there, widowed, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, is listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Bates Township, Greenville Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes his son, Walter (Wheeler) Bramlett, 8, born in August 1891 in South Carolina to parents born there, and his mother, Rebecca, 69, born in December 1830 in South Carolina to parents born in England, mother of five living children (NARA Film T623:1529:55A). “William H. Bramlett,” 47, widowed, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, is listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for Bates Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with one grown child: Walter (Wheeler) Bramlett, 18 (NARA Film T624:1460:69B). Both were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “William H. Bramlett,” 56, farmer, general farm, is listed in the 1920 U. S. Census for Bates Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with one grown child: Walter (Wheeler) Bramlett, 28, and his wife, Evie, 24, and their child: Boyce, 2 2/12 (NARA Film T625:1697:68A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.


   Eliza W. Bramlett, eleventh child of Rev. William and Nancy S. (Dacus) Bramlett, was born circa 1827 in Greenville Co., S. C. She died sometime after Jan. 20, 1860, in Texas. Eliza is enumerated in her parents’ household in the 1830-1840 U. S. Census records for Greenville District. “Eliza Bramlett,” 23, born in South Carolina, is listed there with her parents in the 1850 U. S. Census. The Southern Patriot newspaper on Jan. 20, 1853, reported that Eliza W. Bramlett, daughter of the Rev. William Bramlett of Greenville District, married T. P. C. Miles of Spartanburg District on Jan. 11, 1853. Rev. Barnett Smith performed their marriage ceremony. Thomas P. C. Miles died before Jan. 2, 1860. His wife, Eliza, petitioned the court to appoint William H. Bramlett (her brother) guardian of her son, John Thomas Miles, the minor heir of Thomas Miles, deceased, on Jan. 2, 1860, in Greenville District. John Thomas Miles was “over four years old” at that time. William H. Bramlett “filed his Bond for Three Thousand Dollars.” William and J. L. Westmoreland signed as securities with J. M. Westmoreland as witness. “Eliza Miles,” 32, born in South Carolina, house keeper, $1,600 personal estate, and son, John T. Miles, 5, born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Mush Creek P.O., Tyger Div., Greenville Co., S. C., living with her parents, William Bramlett, 74, born in South Carolina, Methodist clergy, and Nancy, 72, born in Virginia, house keeper, and two sisters: Elizabeth, 48, and Martha, 41, both seamstresses and both born in South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1220:506B).
  

Tombstones of John Wesley E. Bramlett and wife, Sarah Wilson, Mountain View Cemetery, courtesy Robin Farley Dixson


Descendants James Thomas Hammond and Ellen (Bramlett) Clarke of Columbia, S. C., and the late Louise (Hutchings) Galway provided most of the following about John Wesley Ervin Bramlett and wife, Sarah Wilson and her family.


   John Wesley Ervin Bramlett, twelfth child of Rev. William and Nancy S. (Dacus) Bramlett, was born Aug. 24, 1829, in Greenville Dist., S. C. He died May 16, 1915, in Liberty, Greenville Co., S. C., and was buried the next day in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery, Taylors, S. C. His grave marker identifies him as Capt. John W. Bramlett. John’s obituary in the May 18, 1915, Greenville News is headlined: “Major Bramlette Died on Sunday; Funeral at Greer”:
Greer, May 17. -- (Special) -- Major John W. Bramlette, of the 18th South Carolina regiment, Confederate States of America, died at his home in Liberty, on Sunday, aged 86 years. Before becoming a major, he was captain of Company D of the same regiment. Death came to Major Bramlette at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John [Eliza C.] Hutchings, who with Mrs. Ben [daughter Mary Anna] Neves, Campobello; Mrs. J. [John] J. [daughter Tallulah Lula] McMakin and Mrs. W. S. [Waddie Spartan] [niece by marriage] Corrie Wilson] Barnett, of O’Neal, survive him. The body of major Bramlette was brought to Greer this morning on train No. 42, and this afternoon at one o’clock the interment was held at the Mountain View Methodist church. The services were conducted by his pastor, the Rev. L. E. Wiggins, and by Rev. A. Q. Rice. The floral offerings were very beautiful, and among them were tributes from the Keowee Chapter and the Hampton-Lee Chapter Daughters of the Confederacy. Major Bramlette was preceded to the grave by his wife, who, before marriage, was Miss Sarah Wilson.
Mrs. Waddy Spartan Barnett mentioned in the obituary is Corrie "Carrie" Wilson, the niece of Sarah Wilson Bramlett. She was considered a daughter since Sarah reared her from infancy after her biological mother died a week after Corrie was born. (James Thomas Hammond, son of Callie Ruth Barnette and Thomas D. Hammond, is a direct descendant of Corrie "Carrie" Wilson and Waddy Spartan Barnette and their son Claude Tandy Barnette and wife, Clarabelle Bramlette, and descends from Corrie's parents, Jasper Wilson and Cornelia Townsend and Corrie's paternal grandparents Sarah Clark and the Hon. John Wilson.) John Wesley Ervin Bramlett first married Sarah Wilson in 1853, according to descendant Louise (Hutchings) Galway. Louise said her grandfather John Bramlett met his wife Sarah Wilson when she was a student and he was teaching school near Wilson's Ferry, now Pelzer, near Sarah’s home, Golden Grove Plantation in Anderson County. Sarah was born there April 24, 1825, the daughter of Sarah Clark and the Honorable John Wilson Jr., a planter, ferry owner and member of the South Carolina House of Representatives in 1812-1817 and a member of the U. S. House of Representatives 7th District in 1821-1823. and the 6th District in 1823-1827. Sarah is included as an heir in her father's estate. He died in 1828. Both of Sarah's parents rest in the family cemetery which was once part of Golden Grove Plantation, now located in Pelzer, S. C. Sarah reportedly died of typhoid fever on Aug. 19, 1893, and was buried in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery, Taylors, S. C. Her obituary appears on page 3 in the Aug. 23, 1893, issue of Greenville Mountaineer:
On last Saturday night Mrs. Sarah Bramlett, wife of Capt. J. W. Bramlett, of Sandy Flat, died of typhoid fever. She was about 68 years of age, the daughter of Hon. John Wilson, who represented this congressional district during Jackson's time, and was the mother of a large family of children, five of whom survive her. She was a member of Mountain View Methodist Church, and her funeral services were held there on last Sunday afternoon and were conducted by Rev. Mr. Earle. Drs. W. J. and J. W. Bramlett, of this county, are sons of the deceased.
Sarah's husband, John, a native of Greenville County, was a teacher and a farmer in Anderson County. He was a member and trustee of Jackson Grove Methodist Episcopal Church in nearby Greenville County in 1896. John is enumerated in his parents’ household in the 1830 and 1840 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C. “John Bramlett,” 21, born in South Carolina, is listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., with his parents, William, 64, born in South Carolina, farmer, $300 real estate, and Nancy, 62, born (illegible--Virginia?), and five siblings born in South Carolina (Elizabeth, 30; Martha, 28; William, 25, laborer; Eliza, 23; Caroline, 18) (NARA Film M432:853:367). “J. W. Bramlett,” 35, c. s. (country school) teacher, $1,000 real estate and $2,000 personal estate, and (first) wife, Sarah, 30, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Brushy Creek, 42nd Regiment Militia Dist., Anderson Co., S. C., with three children: William (Jasper), 6, who had attended school within the year; Francis (Martha), 4, female; and John (Wilson), 6/12. Also listed: James Kelly, 14. The record indicates all were born in South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1212:323A). J. W. Bramlett on Dec. 20, 1860, served on the South Carolina Legislative Committee on Privileges and Elections, which gave a report and appointed poll and election managers for Abbeville, Ninety-Six, Cedar Springs, Bordeaux, All Saints Parish, White Plains, Williamston, Five Forks and Anderson districts (SCDAH Series S165005, Item 260, p. 1).


   John served as a Confederate officer during the Civil War/War Between the States. He raised a company, Capt. J. W. Bramlett's Company, later Company D, Eighteenth Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, and enlisted himself on Dec. 4, 1861, for twelve months at Mountain Spring, Anderson Co., S. C. One roster states the regiment, attached to Evans' Brigade, was organized for state service Jan. 2, 1862, and mustered into Confederate service Jan. 5, 1862. The regiment was organized for twelve months but re-organized May 5, 1862, under the conscript act for three years of service from enlistment. The captain's NARA compiled military service records indicate he was age 32 and a resident of Anderson County when he joined and that Col. Martin also enlisted him (Film M267 Roll 297). He was elected captain of his company Dec. 4, 1861, and appointed captain on Dec. 20, 1861, at Camp Hampton, S. C., and was mustered in Dec. 30, 1861. Pay accounts indicate his monthly pay as captain amounted to $130. His re-enlistment, dated April 9, 1862, at Charleston, S. C., describes him as 6 feet tall with a fair complexion, black hair and blue eyes. He received a bounty payment of $50 for enlisting three years the following day. He served two years, eight months unofficially as major from April 1, 1863, until honorably discharged in December. He was recommended for promotion to major Dec. 6, 1863; but his military records do not clearly indicate he actually was promoted. He apparently resigned before the recommendation was made. He requested a fifteen-day leave of absence on Nov. 1, 1863, to take care of "business of great importance that requires my presence at home" in Anderson, S. C. His request indicates he had not been home in eight months. He returned and tendered his resignation Nov. 26, 1863, from Camp at Christ Church Parish, S. C., and was discharged Dec. 8, 1863. After the war John was a member of Camp Manning Austin of Confederate Veterans, which was organized Nov. 18, 1893, in Greenville County.
Majot John Wesley Ervin Bramlett's re-enlistment letter
  

Majot Bramlett's request for leave and resignation letter
   “John Bramlett,” 40, farmer, $300 real estate, $200 personal estate, and (first) wife, Sarah, 40, are listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Mush Creek P.O., Highland Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with six children: Wm. (Jasper) 15; (Frances) Martha, 13; John (Wilson), 10; Mary A. (Anna), 8; Talula, 5; and Eliza (C.), 3 (NARA Film M593:1498:675B). All were born in South Carolina. “John Bramlette,” 50, farmer, and (first) wife, Sarah, 50, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Highland Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with six grown and minor children: William (Jasper), 24, physician; Mattie (Frances Martha), 21; John W. (Wilson), 20, farm laborer; Mary (Anna), 17; Loula, 15, at school; Eliza (C.), 13 (NARA Film T9:1231:304A). Also listed is Sarah's niece Carrie (Corrie) Wilson, 6, boarder. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. John and Sarah’s children are William Jasper, Frances Martha ("Mattie"), John Wilson, Mary Anna, Tallulah (“Lula”) and Eliza C. Bramlett. They also reared Sarah's niece, Corrie Wilson, daughter of Sarah's brother Jasper Wilson after Corrie's mother, Cornelia Townsend Wilson, died about a week after her birth in 1874.
   After Sarah died, John second married Susan J. Chastain circa 1898. “John W. Bramlett,” 70, born in August 1829 in South Carolina to a mother born in Virginia, father born in South Carolina, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, married forty-seven years, and (second) wife, Susan J. (Chastain), 37, born in June or January 1862 in South Carolina to parents born there, married two years, no children, are listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Highland Township, Greenville Co., S. C. (NARA Film T623:1530:184A). After John died Susan lived with relatives. “Susan Bramlett,” 51, born in South Carolina, widowed, sister, seamstress, is listed in the 1920 U. S. Census for Ward 4, Greenville, Greenville Co., S. C., living with H. T. Chastine, 48, studio photographer, head of the family, which also includes their sister Lizzie Chastine, 52, single, and three other unrelated boarders (NARA Film T625:1698:146B).
   William Jasper Bramlett, first child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born Nov. 10, 1854, in Greenville Co., S. C. He died Sept. 8, 1909, at home in Campobello, S. C., and was buried two days later in Campobello Methodist Church Cemetery. William’s obituary appears in the Spartanburg Herald dated Friday, Sept. 10, 1909: 
Campobello, S. C., Sept. 9. -- Our town and community has been saddened by the death of Dr. W. J. Bramlett, who died at his home last night at ten o’clock. Dr. Bramlett had been sick only a week, and his death has caused much sorrow over the entire community. Dr. Bramlett was liked by all who knew him, and his place will be hard to fill. He leaves a wife and four children, a father and three sisters. He will be buried beside his brother, Dr. John W. Bramlett, who died two years ago, tomorrow at the Methodist Church at eleven o’clock. Rev. E. Z. James will conduct the funeral services.
William married Elizabeth C. “Eliza” Howell in or shortly before 1880. She was born Feb. 17, 1860, in Greenville County, the daughter of Mary A. Gilreath and John H. Howell. Eliza died May 20, 1945, in Asheville, N. C., and was buried two days later in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery. Her grave marker identifies her as Eliza C. Bramlett. Her obituary appears in the May 21, 1945, edition of the Greenville News: 
Mrs. Eliza Howell Bramlett, widow of Dr. W. J. Bramlett of Greenville, S. C., died at an Asheville Hospital today following a brief illness. She was born in Greenville County, S. C., February 16, 1860, the daughter of John H. and Mary G. Howell. She moved here [Asheville] from Greenville in 1922 where she has resided with her children. Surviving are three sons and one daughter, John H. [Pat], George H. [W.?], W. Arthur, and Miss Bertha Bramlett, all of Asheville. Funeral services will be conducted from Jackson Grove Methodist church near Greenville, S. C. Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. by Rev. Lee F. Tuttle, pastor of Central Methodist church of which she was a member, and Rev. Peden Gene Curry. The following nephews will serve as pallbearers: Associate Justice G. Dewey Oxner of Greenville, Lawrence G. Vannoy, C. G. Washington, J. Carlisle and Vannoy C. Oxner, Jr., Spart J. McKinney and Hovey Smith. 
“William W. Bramlett,” 26, physician, and wife, Eliza, 20, keeping house, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S. C. (NARA Film T9:1231:281A). “William Bramlett,” 24, also is listed with his father in 1880 in Highland Township: He must have married that year after the census was taken for Highland Township and before the census was taken in O’Neal Township where he lived after his marriage. William was a physician who practiced medicine in Greenville and Spartanburg counties. He attended medical school in Kentucky and in 1894 studied at the New York Post-Graduate School and Hospital in New York City (Bellevue). The People’s Paper reported that Dr. W. J. Bramlette moved his family to Charleston in November 1895. They moved to Campobello circa 1904. At the time of his death, he had a medical practice there. “Dr. William J. Bramlett,” 40, born in November 1860, physician, married eighteen years, and wife, Eliza, 38, born February 1862, mother of nine children, four living, are listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Greenville Township, Greenville County, with four children: George, 16, born February 1884; Bertha, 13, born June 1890; Arthur, 7, born August 1892; and John H., 4, born February 1896 (NARA Film T623:1529:22). Also listed with the family: Emily C. Gilreath, 82, born in January 1818, aunt, widowed, and N. Harriet Anderson, 68, born January 1832, aunt, single. “Eliza Bramlett,” 50, rents home, is listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for Campobello Township, Spartanburg Co., S. C., with four children: George, 26, undertaker; Bertha, 22; Arthur, 18, street railway conductor; and John, 14 (NARA Film T624:1472:195A). Harriet Anderson, 78, aunt, widowed ten years, no children, also is listed with the family. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Eliza C. Bramlett,” 59, is listed in the 1920 U. S. Census for Greenville Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with three children: Bertha, 29; William A., 26, law office; and John H., 23, salesman (NARA Film T625:1698:125B). All were born in South Carolina. Eliza and William’s children are George Washington, Bertha Mae, William Arthur and John H. Bramlett.
   Martha “Mattie” Bramlett, second child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born circa 1857-58 in Greenville District. Martha lived with her parents in Greenville County in 1870 and 1880.
Descendant Ellen (Bramlett) Clarke of Columbia, S. C., provides some of the following.
   Dr. John Wilson Bramlett, third child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born Nov. 17, 1859, in Anderson Co., S. C. He died April 3, 1907, at home in Campobello, Spartanburg Co., S. C., and was buried the next day in Campobello Methodist Church Cemetery. In mid-March 1907, he became ill with influenza and subsequently developed pneumonia which caused his death. He died seven months before his 48th birthday. John’s obituary appears in the Chester Lantern dated Friday, April 12, 1907:
Dr. John W. Bramlett died Wednesday, April 3, after an illness of about three and a half weeks. He was buried on Thursday following at the M. E. church, of which he had long been a faithful and zealous member. The funeral services were conducted by his pastor, Rev. E. Z. James, assisted by Rev. J. T. Fowler of Spartanburg, and Rev. W. W. Jones of this place. About 1,000 people came to pay the last tribute of respect to this worthy man, who had been friend and physician for the past 25 years. He had the largest practice of any physician, perhaps, in the county, on account of which he had been over-worked for a long while. He was 47 years old. He leaves a wife, who was Miss Eva Wilkes, of Chester, and two childrenJohn graduated from Atlanta Medical College, a Methodist school which later became part of Emory University. He may have also attended medical school in Kentucky. He practiced medicine in 1883 at Sandy Flats and Grove Station. He practiced at various times in Pickens, Greenville and Spartanburg counties. He owned a drugstore and practiced medicine in Campobello, S. C., from the early 1890s until he died in 1907. Descendant Ellen Bramlett Clarke describes John as a “popular resident of the area and widely respected as a doctor who responded willingly to calls at all hours of day or night. He had a telephone in his office in 1904. His steadfastly loyal horse, purchased in Kentucky, could be depended on to bring the sleeping doctor directly home late at night.” However, Ellen points out a publicized incident that indicates the horse may have fallen asleep as well one late night in 1903. A local newspaper correspondent related the following story involving Dr. Bramlett and his horse: “One night last week, Dr. J. W. Bramlett had a serious accident while returning home from a professional visit. The doctor went to sleep as he was riding along in his buggy and his horse stepped into an excavation 15 feet deep on the side of the road. The doctor was painfully injured in the back, leg and ankle. It was some time before he was able to get out of the hole into which he had fallen. The horse escaped injury and the buggy was not badly damaged.” John’s 1894 voter registration certificate indicates he was a resident of Campobello living at W. R. Ballard’s home. “John W. Bramlett,” 35, born in November 1864 in South Carolina to parents born there, boarder, physician, is listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Campobello Township, Spartanburg Co., S. C., living with John E. Darby, 46, born in May 1854, farmer, head of the family, married twenty-one years, and wife, Mary L., 39, born in March 1861, mother of three children, one living, and their child Eula L., 13, May 1887 (NARA Film T623:1541:89B). Six other boarders also were listed in the household. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “John Wilson was an ardent Methodist, an active participant in community affairs and a major force in construction of the Campobello Methodist Church,” according to Ellen Bramlett Clarke. “He was also active in politics--in 1902, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for the South Carolina Legislature. That same year, he met and began a courtship of Eva Florence Wilkes who was teaching in the elementary school at Campobello.”

Dr. John Wilson Bramlett and wife, Eva Wilkes, courtesy Ellen Bramlett Clarke

John was 43 years old when he married Eva, 25, on Jan. 25, 1903, at the residence of Bishop W. W. Duncan, Spartanburg, S. C. Their marriage was reported by the Spartanburg Journal on Monday, Jan., 26, 1903: “A Sunday Marriage”:
Dr. Bramlett of Campobello Married to Miss Wilkes of Chester Here. An interesting marriage took place in this city yesterday, the contracting parties being prominent people of this section of the state. The groom is Dr. J. W. Bramlett, a leading physician of Campobello, and the bride, Miss Wilkes, a well known and popular young lady of Chester. The bridal party arrived here Sunday morning and stopped at the Spartan Inn. At once a flurry was created in the hotel and everybody was asking, "Who’s going to be married?" The party was accompanied by Dr. W. J. Bramlett and Geo. H. [W.?] Bramlett of Greenville, relatives of the groom. At 12 o’clock, the party went to the residence of Bishop W. W. Duncan on North Church street, where the marriage ceremony was performed by Bishop Duncan. After the ceremony they returned to the hotel, remaining until their train arrived. They departed Sunday afternoon. The bride is an attractive young woman of Chester, who is teaching at Campobello. It was the desire of the young couple that Bishop Duncan unite them in marriage. The bride was stylishly attired in a blue broadcloth suit, tailor-made with a becoming hat to match.
Eva was born July 1, 1878 in Chester Co., S. C., the daughter of Eliza Walker and John Wesley Wilkes. Eva died Oct. 22, 1952, in Chester. Her obituary, which appears in the Oct. 23, 1952, edition of The State in Columbia, is headlined “Mrs. Bramlett, Chester Civic Leader, Dies”:
Mrs. Eva Wilkes Bramlett, 74, widow of Dr. John Wilson Bramlett of the Baton Rouge community of western Chester county, died at 12:30 this morning at the Chester County Hospital [Pryor Hospital] of heart trouble. She was a former postmistress of Leeds for 20 years and a widely known former public school teacher. She was an outstanding civic leader of Chester county and a charter member of the Chester County Council of Farm Women. As a member of that council, along with another member, Mrs. J. C. Shannon of Blackstock, she was instrumental in the organization of the Chester County home demonstration department which has been such a great asset to the county since that day. She was graduated from the Chester county schools and from Asheville (N. C.) College and Columbia College. Following graduation she taught school for approximately 20 years at Conway, Baton Rouge and Campobello. She married Doctor Bramlett, prominent physician of Campobello who died in 1906 [1907]. Mrs. Bramlett was a member of New Hope Methodist Church where she took a great interest in all departments. She was president of its missionary society for a quarter of a century. Then she was made honorary president. Mrs. Bramlett was a daughter of the late Capt. John Wesley [Wilkes], an officer of the Confederate army, and the late Mrs. Eliza Walker Wilkes. After having retired as postmistress at Leeds following 20 years service, she had made her home for the past two years with her son, John Wesley Bramlett at Baton Rouge. Mrs. Bramlett is survived by her son, John Wesley Bramlett of Baton Rouge; a daughter, Mrs. Thomas [Sarah] Lake of Silverstreet; seven grandchildren, one great-grandchild; two brothers, B. Frank Wilkes of Chester and Robert W. Wilkes of Baton Rouge, and two sisters, Mrs. W. M. Harley [Blanche] of Jamison, Orangeburg County, and Miss Nelle Wilkes of Baton Rouge. Funeral services will be conducted at 3 o’clock Thursday afternoon from Calvary Baptist Church, Chester county, by the Rev. Francis V. Robertson of Armenia, the Rev. E. W. Buckner of Chester and the Rev. S. B. White of Union. Interment will follow in the family plot in the historic church cemetery.
Eva was “the eldest and favorite child of her father, Captain John Wesley Wilkes (also known as Judge Wilkes since he was a longtime local magistrate), and his wife, Eliza Walker Harden,” according to Ellen Bramlett Clarke. Eva “attended Columbia Female College in Columbia, S. C., for two years and received teacher training at Asheville Normal School, Asheville, N. C. She was awarded a First Grade Teacher’s Certificate the highest level. At age 18, she was teaching grades one through eight in a one-room school in the Baton Rouge Section of Chester Co., S. C. She taught at Campobello Graded School during the spring term of 1901 and in Conway in 1901-1902 at the Burroughs Graded School. In the fall of 1902, Eva returned to teach at Campobello. She met Dr. John Wilson Bramlett, a local druggist and physician, and they were married in January 1903.” When her husband died from complications of pneumonia, Eva “was left with the burdens of two very young children to rear and heavy debts left by her husband, a hard-working doctor who had not pressed patients to pay,” Ellen Bramlett Clarke explains. “A note circa March 1908 penned on a copy of the statement of one former patient’s account reveals the widow’s desperate financial straits: ‘I do need this money so much. I would be more than thankful if you will kindly hand it to Mr. Walter Jackson [at the bank] for me. I have two little helpless babies to raise, surely you can arrange to pay me this amount [25.00]. Mrs. J. W. Bramlett.’” Dr. Bramlett’s ledger book for 1901-1903 lists payments in both cash and goods, including one dog $4.00; one turkey $1.00; one gallon of syrup $0.40; fodder $10.00; two pigs $5.00; one bushel of potatoes $0.60; three hens $0.75; 10 bushels of corn $8.50; one ham $2.50; and firewood $5.00. Ellen Bramblett Clarke indicates that “Of the almost 300 patient accounts in this ledger, less than half had paid their bills when Dr. Bramlett died in 1907 and indeed, never paid them.” Eva was forced to sell the drug store and their house and land in Campobello. Subsequently, “After two years of trying to settle her husband’s business affairs, Eva found it necessary to move back to her family’s home in Chester County. In Baton Rouge Township again, in the fall of 1909, Eva returned to teaching and her parents took care of the children. She taught school for the next 20 years and in 1933, became postmistress of the post office at Leeds, S. C. Eva was widely known in Chester county for her work in church and community affairs and for her extensive knowledge of family history.” “Eva W. Bramlett,” 31, widowed, public school teacher, mother of two living children, and two children--John W. (Wesley), 5, and Sarah W., 3--are listed with Eva’s parents, John W. Wilkes, 69, farmer, general farm, owner of a mortgaged farm, married thirty-three years, and Eliza W., 57, mother of five living children, in the 1910 U. S. Census for Baton Rouge Township, Chester Co., S. C. (NARA Film T624:1455:2B). Other Wilkes family members listed: Robert W., 26, farm manager, home farm; Nellie H., 27, teacher, public school; and Benjamin F., 14. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Eva W. Bramlett,” 41, high school teacher, and children, John Wesley, 15, farmer, general farm, and Sarah (Cynthia), 13, are listed with her father, John Wesley Wilks, 78, farmer, and three siblings (Nellie H., 36, high school teacher; Robert W., 35, farmer; and B. Frank, 23, farmer) in the 1920 U. S. Census for Baton Rouge Township, Calhoun Co., S. C. (NARA Film T625:1689:206B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
   Mary Anna Bramlett, fourth child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born April 4, 1866, in Greenville County. She died at age 90 on July 29, 1956, at home in Campobello and was buried two days later in Campobello United Methodist Church Cemetery. Anna’s obituary in the Monday, July 30, 1956, edition of the Spartanburg Herald indicates she was born and reared in Greenville County:
Campobello -- Mrs. Anna Bramlett Neves, 90, died Sunday at 7:15 a.m. at her home here, after three days’ serious illness. She was the widow of Benjamin F. Neves. She was born and reared in Greenville County, daughter of the late J. W. and Sarah Wilson Bramlett. She was a member of the Campobello Methodist Church. Surviving are: two daughters, Mrs. Flora Collins Hill and Mrs R. P. [Mamie] Barnett of Campobello; five grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Monday at 4 p.m. at Campobello Methodist Church. The Revs. T. L. Chapman, J. G. Stroud and Leon Gambrell will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Pallbearers will be Gordon and Ernest Neves, J. W. Barnett, Sam McMakin, Hubert Lindsey and Leon Few. The body will be at the home after 10 a.m. Monday and will be taken to the church at 3 p.m. Petty Funeral Home of Landrum is in charge of arrangements.
Anna married Benjamin Franklin Neves, one of twelve children born to Nancy Jane Chastain and George Washington Neves. Benjamin was born April 27, 1870, in Greenville County where he grew up. He died Jan. 23, 1942, at home in Campobello, S. C., and was buried two days later in Campobello United Methodist Church Cemetery. His obituary in the Jan. 24, 1942, edition of the Spartanburg Herald indicates he was born in upper Greenville County:
Campobello -- Benjamin Franklin Neves, 71, died this afternoon at 6:15 o’clock at his home after one year of declining health and a serious illness of 12 weeks. He was a native of upper Greenville county, the son of the late Washington and Nancy Chastain Neves. He was a member of Campobello Methodist Church and the Campobello W. O. W. Camp. He had lived here for over 25 years. Surviving are his widow, the former Miss Ana Bramlett; two daughters, Mrs. Flora Collins and Mrs. R. P. [Mamie] Barnett; three brothers, Albert, Thornton and C. R. Neves; four sisters, Mrs. Rosa Taylor, Mrs. Lydia Lindsey, Mrs. Tessie Few, and Mrs. Fannie Bishop and five grandchildren. Funeral services will be conducted Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock from Campobello Methodist church. Further announcements will be made from Petty Funeral home.
Ben sawed the timber and built a house on farmland in Spartanburg County in 1896. He was a farmer who grew cotton, cane and peaches. For years he budded peach trees and sold them at the farm. His grandson, Maurice Collins, remembers Ben as a jack-of-all-trades: a carpenter, handyman and farmer. He and Anna lived on their farm until they moved to Campobello in 1928. Ben served as mayor of Campobello in 1930-34. Ben and Anna were members of Campobello Methodist Church. Their children are Mamie and Flora Neves. At the time of her death, Anna had five Grandchildren and eight Great Grandchildren.
   Tallulah Lula Bramlett, fifth child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born Dec. 10, 1864, in Greenville County. She died June 14, 1927, at home in Greenville, S. C., and was buried the next day in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery, Tigerville, S. C. Lula’s obituary in the Wednesday, June 15, 1927, edition of the Greenville News indicates she was a life-long resident of Greenville County:
Mrs. Lula Bramlett McMakin, 62, died at her home, 25 Seyles Street, Duncan Mill, yesterday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock. She had been ill for several weeks, although her death comes as a shock to her many friends here. Mrs. McMakin was a life-long resident of this county, having come to Greenville a short time ago. She was a faithful member of Concord Methodist Church at Greer. She is survived by her husband, J. J. McMakin; one daughter, Mrs. J. R. [BessFreeman of Charlotte, N. C.; and four sons, W. F., J. E. and J. C. [William F., John E., James C.] McMakin, all of Greenville; and S. A. [Samuel A.] McMakin of Greer. Three sisters also survive, as follows, Mrs. B. F. [Mary Anna] Neeves of Campobello; Mrs. W. S. [Corrie Wilson] Barnett, of Taylors; and Mrs. J. T. [Eliza C.] Hutchins, of this city. Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 4 o’clock from Mountain View Church. Rev. H. B. Koone officiating, assisted by Rev. J. B. Connelley. Interment will be made in the church cemetery. The following will serve as pallbearers: W. F. Freeman, J. M. Wilson, E. W. Barnett, C. H. Holland, T. C. Barnett, and Mr. Heath.
Lula married John James McMakin, the son of Elizabeth Zimmerman and Peter C. McMakin. John was born Dec. 11, 1852, in Greenville County. His obituary in the Monday, Nov. 6, 1933, edition of the Greenville News indicates he died Nov. 5, 1933, in Charlotte, N. C.:
John James McMakin, 80, died at 11 o’clock this morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. R. Freeman, in Charlotte after an illness of two weeks. He was a former resident of Greer but had been living in Charlotte for three years. He was a son of the late P. C. and Elizabeth Zimmerman McMakin. Mr. McMakin is survived by one daughter, Mrs. [Bess] Freeman, of Charlotte; and four sons, William, John and James McMakin, all of Greenville, and Samuel McMakin, of Greer; two brothers, Samuel McMakin and Arthur McMakin, of Fairforest. Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 4 o’clock at the Mountain View Methodist church near Tigerville, conducted by the Rev. A. H. Bauknight and the Rev. James Bruce. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. The body was brought to Greer today and until the hour for the funeral will remain at the Wood mortuary.
John and Lula lived in Greer where they attended Concord Methodist Church, before moving to Greenville. “Lula McMakin,” 32, born in December 1867, mother of four living children, married nine years, and husband, John J., 46, born in December 1853, laborer, cotton mill, rents home, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with four children: Hugh L., 7, July 1892; Bessie, 4, September 1895; Willie, 5, February 1899; and Samuel A., 10/12, born in July 1899 (NARA Film T623:1529:102A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Tallulah T. McMakin,” 40, mother of six children, five living, first marriage, married twenty years, and husband, John J., 56, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for Chick Springs Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with five children: Bessie, 14, farm laborer, home farm; William F., 13, farm laborer, home farm; Samuel A., 10; John C., 6; and James E., 1 9/12 (NARA Film T624:1461:100A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. After Lula died John lived with a daughter in Charlotte, N. C. John and Lula’s children are Bess, William F., John E., James C., Samuel A. and Hugh L. McMakin.
The late Louise (Hutchings) Galway provided some of the following information about Eliza C. (Bramlett) Hutchings and family.
   Eliza C. “Lydie” Bramlett, sixth child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born March 19, 1871, in Greenville County. She died there Oct. 18, 1950, and was buried two days later in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery. Her grave marker identifies her as the wife of “John T. Hutchins.” Eliza’s obituary appears in the Greenville News dated Oct. 19, 1950:
Mrs. Eliza (Lydie) Bramlett Hutchings, wife of the late John T. Hutchings, died Wednesday morning at 5:10 o’clock, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Alex W. [Louise] Galway of 16 East Mountain View Avenue, following an illness of one day. Mrs. Hutchings was a native of Greenville County, where she had spent her entire life. She was born March 19, 1871, a daughter of the late Captain J. W. [John Wesley Ervin] Bramlett and Sara (Wilson) Bramlett. Mrs. Hutchings was a member of St. Mark’s Methodist Church. Mr. Hutchings died December 17, 1948. In addition to Mrs. Galway, Mrs. Hutchings is survived by another daughter, Mrs. M. D. [Grace] Chastain of Easley, two sons, J. M. Hutchings of Cincinnati, O., and Paul T. Hutchings of Charleston; one sister, Mrs. B. F. Neves of Campobello, seven grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Services will be conducted at 11 o’clock Friday morning at the Mackey Mortuary. The body will remain at the mortuary. The family will be at the home of Mrs. Alex W. Galway, 16 East Mountain View Avenue.
Eliza married John Thomas Hutchings on Jan. 19, 1892. He was born Sept. 9, 1871, in Greenville County, the son of Nan Snow and J. Dexter Hutchings of Batesville. John died Dec. 17, 1948, and was buried the next day in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery. His obituary was published in the Greenville News on Friday, Dec. 18, 1948:
Funeral services for John T. Hutchings, retired mechanic, occurred at a local hospital yesterday morning at 2:20 o’clock following one week of illness, will be held at St. Marks Methodist Church Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Services will be conducted by the Rev. R. W. Sammeth and Dr. R. W. Turnipseed and interment will be in the family plot in the Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery. The following will serve as pallbearers and meet at the church at 1:30 o’clock: Tom Morgan, James Shedd, G. C. Cloninger, S. J. Bailey, M. A. Duncan and C. A. Tucker. The members of the building committee and the board of stewards of the church, with W. H. Ferguson, J. T. Hays, E. L. Johns, I. H. Ambrose, Paul Knight, Toy Duncan, J. L. Freeman, W. F. West, Dr. Fred Robertson and H. M. Rogers, will compose the escort of honor and also meet at the church at 1:30. Mr. Hutchings was the son of the late J. Dexter Hutchings and Mrs. Nan (Snow) Hutchings, residents of the Batesville community of Greenville county and was 77 years. For some years before moving to this city 30 years ago, he had lived in Pickens. Mr. Hutchings was a member of St. Marks Methodist church and had held offices as steward, superintendent of the Sunday School and trustee, and was serving as a member of the building committee of the church at the time of his death. His wife, Mrs. Eliza Bramlett Hutchings, survives at the home being at 129 Bailey Street, Sans Souci, with two sons, J. Marvin Hutchings of Cincinnati and Paul T. Hutchings of Charleston and two daughters, Mrs. A. W. [Louise] Galway of this city and Mrs. M. D. [Grace] Chastain of Easley. One brother, S. B. Hutchings of Greer, and three sisters, Miss Florence Hutchings, Mrs. Edgar Wright and Mrs. R. D. Dobson, all of Greer, also survive. In addition, he is survived by seven grandchildren and by five great-grandchildren. The body will remain at the Mackey Mortuary until 1 o’clock Saturday afternoon, when it will be placed in the church to lie in state until the hour of the service.
John Hutchings’s grandfather, Rev. John Thomas Hutchings who preached in upper Greenville County and died in Georgia in 1869, was a local Methodist minister and the original proprietor of the Batesville cotton factory.) John Hutchings was a mechanic and machinist at Monagan Mill in Greenville. His father operated a store on the road to Ceaser’s Head in the mountains of Northern Greenville County. Eliza expressed her grief for John in a letter written to her sister-in-law Eva Bramlett nine months after his death: “It seems to me I can’t ever live without John. He was such a good man and was so good to me; we were so happy together. This winter will be so lonesome for me.” She died the following year. John and Eliza lived in Greenville in 1927. Their children are Triplets Infant Son (died at birth), Grace and Louise HutchingsJohn Marvin; and Paul Thomas Hutchings. Eliza and John had seven Grandchildren and seven Great-grandchildren at the time of Eliza’s death.


Descendant Herbert Rogers and wife, Sonia, of Greenville, S. C., contribute some of the following information about Malinda Caroline (Bramlett) Rogers and family.



Willis R. Rogers served in the Confederacy during the War Between the States
   Malinda Caroline Bramlett, thirteenth child of Rev. William and Nancy S. (Dacus) Bramlett, was born circa 1832 in Greenville Co., S. C. She died after 1880 and was buried in Salem Methodist Church Cemetery, White Horse Road, Greenville, S. C. Malinda Caroline is enumerated in Greenville County with her parents in the 1840 U. S. Census. “Caroline Bramlett,” 18, born in South Carolina, is listed there with her parents in the 1850 U. S. Census. She married Willis R. Rogers/Rodgers in 1854. Willis was born July 25, 1827, in Spartanburg, S. C., the son of Elizabeth Bailey and Darling Rogers. Willis died July 17, 1898, and was buried in Salem Methodist Church Cemetery. His grave is marked with a Confederate Iron Cross. Willis, a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States, enlisted as a private in Company H, “Hatch’s Regiment of Coast Rangers,” 23rd Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, on Nov. 10, 1861, at James Island, S. C. He was captured July 10 or 16, 1863, at Jackson, Miss., during the Battle of Vicksburg and was held as a prisoner of war at Camp Morton, Ind., and Point Lookout, Md. He was transferred for exchange March 15, 1865. Before the war Willis and Caroline lived in the Reidville community of Spartanburg County near his family. “Caroline Rodgers,” 27, born in South Carolina, and husband, Willis, 33, tenant farmer and head of the family, $400 personal estate, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Cashville P.O./Township, Southern Div., Spartanburg Co., S. C., with three children: Cornelia, 4; Catharine, 3; and Mary, 1 (NARA Film M653:1226:388A). All were born in South Carolina. The family moved across the county line into Greenville County by 1870 and settled in Gantt Township where they farmed. “Caroline Rodgers,” 38, keeping house, and husband, Willis, 42, laborer, head of the family, are listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Greenville Court House Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with five children: Cornelia, 14; Catharine, 12; Adaline, 8; Ella, 5; Franklin, 3; Bramlett, 1 (NARA Film M593:1498:592B). All were born in South Carolina. “Melinda Rodgers,” 40, keeping house, and husband, Willis, 53, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Gantt Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with five children: Ella, 15; Frank, 11; Bramlet, 9; Eliza, 6; Eber, 3 (NARA Film T9:1230:105B). All were born in South Carolina. Willis and Malinda Caroline’s children are Cornelia, Catherine (“Kate”), Mary, Adeline, Ella, Franklin, Bramlett, Eliza and Eber Columbus Rogers.
   Cornelia Rogers, first child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1856 in Greenville or Spartanburg Co., S. C. She married a man named Ross circa 1880.
   Catherine “Kate” Rogers, second child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1857 in Greenville or Spartanburg Co., S. C. Her grave marker in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery in Gantt, Greenville Co., S. C., indicates she died in 1935. She married Pinkney D. Pollard. He was born circa 1848-50. He died in 1889 and was buried in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery. “Kate Pollard,” 25, keeping house, and husband, Pink, 30, laborer, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Gantt Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with three children: William, 6; John, 3; and Mary, 1 (NARA Film T9:1230:107B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
   Adaline Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1872 in Greenville Co., S. C. She married a Rhodes.
  Mary Rogers, child of Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1859 in Greenville Co., S. C.
   Ella Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1865 in Greenville Co., S. C. She married a Westmoreland.
   Franklin Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1867-1869 in Greenville Co., S. C.
   Bramlett Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born April 29, 1870, in Greenville Co., S .C. He died March 20, 1927, and was buried in Rehobeth Baptist Church Cemetery, Old Pelzer Road, near Piedmont, Anderson Co., S. C. Bramlett first married a woman named Wilson. She died and was buried in Rehobeth Baptist Church Cemetery. Their children are Annie, Jack and Samuel “Pete” Rogers. Bramlett second married Pearl Whitt. She died and was buried in Rehobeth Baptist Church Cemetery. Their child is Walter Herbert Rogers. Bramlett third married Hassie Jordan. She died and was buried in Rehobeth Baptist Church Cemetery. They did not have children, but Hassie raised Bramlett’s children from his other marriages.
   Eliza Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1874 in Greenville Co., S. C. She married William Wilson.
   Eber Columbus Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born April 20, 1877, in Greenville Co., S. C.
   Margaret Bramlett, second child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Nov. 27, 1787, in Laurens Co., S. C. Margaret’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She married a Dacus, and her family settled in Mississippi.
   Nathaniel "Nathan" Bramlett, third child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born May 30, 1789, in Laurens Co., S. C. His birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by his brother Reuben. He and his family settled in Hall Co., Ga. He was a founder of a Methodist Church there.


   Nancy Bramlett, fourth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Sept. 20, 1790, in Laurens Co., S. C. She married Lemuel Dacus on Dec. 15, 1814, and she and her family moved to Mississippi. Her son Thomas W. Dacus was born Jan. 14, 1836.
  

Rev. Reuben Bramlett and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett rest in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery

Rev. Reuben Bramlett, fifh child of John and Mary (Peak) Bramlett, was born Oct. 30, 1791, according to his Bramlett Bible, in Laurens Co., S. C. He died Nov. 30, 1884, in Greenville Co., S. C., and was buried there near his parents in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville. His grave marker is inscribed with his birth and death dates. His obituary was published in the Southern Christian Advocate on March 25, 1885:
Bramlett.—Died, Nov. 30, 1884, Father Reuben Bramlett, at the residence of his son, Robert, who had removed his father to his house some weeks before his death. Not that Father Bramlett had not a comfortable and abundant home of his own, where he resided with a most affectionate daughter, but that affection prompted to do all that might be done—by varying the scene around him—to prolong his life. He was 93 years old, Oct. 30, one month before his death. He enjoyed the greatest Christian serenity I have have ever known one to possess. For years before his death, meet him where you would, in reply to the usual salutation, “How do you do?” he would answer “Feeble in body, but as happy as a man can be.” He united with the church after he attained to manhood and was married. He was ever much devoted to Sabbath-schools, and gave, as a teacher, constant attention until 1880, when he became so deaf he could no longer teach a class. He then sat as a scholar in a class until within a few weeks of his death. His wife preceded him to the grave about 11 years ago, full of faith and hope. His residence was near Bethel Church, Greenville Ct. He was a son of sainted Father John Bramlett, of precious memory to Bethel Church. A very large concourse attended the burial at Bethel. (Vol. 48, No. 12, p. 7, col. 2)
Reuben’s tombstone indicates “He joined M. E. Church in his youth.” He was a Methodist preacher and the first mail carrier in the county. Sunday School records at Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church indicate Reuben and some of his family were still members in 1882. He married Sarah D. Dacus on Dec. 15, 1814. Sarah was born Nov. 15, 1796, in Virginia, the sister of Nathaniel G. Dacus and daughter of Elizabeth Glenn Thackston and Nathaniel Dacus, born 1759 and died 1935. Sarah died July 8, 1873, according to the Bible record. Her grave marker in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery lists her birth and death dates and indicates “She joined M. E. Church 1821.” She died in Greenville County. Sarah’s obituary was published in the Southern Christian Advocate in 1873:
...Died, on the 8th of June, 1873, Mrs. Sarah D. Bramlett, wife of Rev. Reuben Bramlett, in the 77th year of her age. The deceased was a native of Virginia, and came with her parents to South Carolina in her childhood, and settled and married in Greenville County; where she has lived for over 70 years, and raised a large family—having at her death some 68 grandchildren, 11 children—9 sons and 2 daughters—and the majority of them have large families living in this county. At one time during the late war, 20 of her sons and grandsons were in the army, fighting for the principles they believed to be right. The Indians had scarcely left their hunting grounds in our county, and the echo of their war songs had barely ceased, when she adopted it as her home. The people of her generation have nearly all passed away. Her husband, Rev. Reuben Bramlett, still survives her, at the advanced age of 83 years, having lived together for over a half century in the enjoyment of a domestic felicity and contentment that few of the present or past generation have ever experienced. Mrs. Bramlett was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for over 50 years, and her influence was like that of a true mother’s love—like the silent dews of heaven, it was ever cheering and refreshing around the family circle, and will transmit its religious power to her latest posterity; for one of the grand aims of her life was to teach her household in the faith that "There is a land of pure delight, / Where saints immortal reign; / Infinite day excludes the night, / And pleasures banish pain." For months before her death, she daily and hourly expected the dread summons, and although suffering the most excruciating agony from Cancer, she was resigned to her fate, and could say, with the patriarch Job, “All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.” And thus has she left to her numerous friends and relatives a consolation that is sweeter than life and stronger than death; for above the bloom of the grave will arise the light of a pure and honest life.
Six of Sarah and Reuben's sons who served as Confederate soldiers during the Civil War/War Between the States--Josiah, William D., Nathaniel D., James W., Elias Andrew, Robert Hugh/Hulett--are referenced by their sister Margaret J. Bramlett Hyde, in a 1909 letter to her nephew Decatur L. Bramlett, Greenville Co., S. C.:
Mauldin SC Sept 28 / 09 Dear Nephew, Your note received and also the record. I will try to answer your questions. Yes, I guess you know pretty much where they all lived and when they died. Josiah died at his old home place Feb 19, 1884. William also died at his old home May the 29, 1875. Nat died in Indiana. I don't know the date of his death. James was wounded at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee and lived ten days afterward and died in the hospital sometime about the first of December in 1864. Andy died at his home near Gadsden, Ala. Feb 27, 1901. They all went to the war. Joe didn't stay but two or three months down on the coast about Port Royal. William was in service about two years. Andy went through the war and never carried a gun, drove a comissary wagon and had a good time. Bob went at the beginning of the war and stayed till the ending and never was wounded. he belonged to the Butler Guards. I went down the grave yard last Sunday and drove up an iron pin at the foot of Grandfathers grave, yes his feet is right at the old stump. This leaves us all very well at present. Hope you are all well. Write and come to see us when you can. Loving your aunt, Margaret Hyde
“Reubin Bramblett,” 58, born in South Carolina, farmer, $800 real estate, and wife, Sarah, 54, born in Virginia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S. C., with five grown children born in South Carolina: Margaret, 19; James, 17, laborer; Andrew, 15; Elizabeth, 13; and Robert, 12 (NARA Film M432:853:458A-B). “Reuben Bramblett” is listed in the 1850 Agricultural Census for Greenville Co., S. C., dated November 25 with 50 improved acres and 150 unimproved acres worth $800 and $300 worth of livestock (SCDAH Film 2:1:779-780). Reuben was the first stage coach driver and mail carrier on the “Old Stage Road” route from Greenville to Laurens. He is listed as a mail carrier in the 1860 census. Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, indicate Reuben Bramblett of Greenville Court House, S. C., was a “Bidder” to carry the Confederate Mail during the war (NARA Film Roll M346 Document 217). “Reuben Bramblet,” 69, born in South Carolina, mail carrier, $1,000 real estate, $322 personal estate, and wife, Sarah P., 63, born in Virginia, house keeper, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Buena Vista P. O., Rocky Creek Div., Greenville Co., S. C., with one grown child: daughter Mary A. (Elizabeth), 23, born in South Carolina, weaver (NARA Film M653:1220:485B). “Reubin Bramlett,” 78, farmer, $500 real estate and $163 personal estate, and wife, Sarah, 73, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Austin Township, Greenville Co., S. C., with one daughter: Elizabeth, 33, born in South Carolina (NARA Film M593:1498:459B-460A). “R. Bramlett,” 89, born in South Carolina to parents both born in Virginia, is listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Austin Township, Greenville Co., S. C., as head of a family that includes his daughter Elizabeth, 40, born in South Carolina, single.
   Reuben and Sarah’s children are Thomas W., Josiah (“Joe”), William D., Nathaniel D., John, Allen Turner, Margaret J., James W., Elias Andrew, Mary A. Elizabeth and Robert Hugh/Hulett Bramlett.
   Thomas W. Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina


   Josiah "Joe" Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. Josiah "Joe" Bramlett married Lucinda Garrett and Lucy Bray. Children of Josiah and Lucy Bray Bramlett include Mary Jane "Molly" and John Thomas Bramlett.
Mary Ann "Molly" Bramlett and Elisha Simpson Smith, above, and Elisha, Butler Guards, 
in Confederate uniform, courtesy Nancy Evelyn (Smith) Jones, Columbia, S. C.

   Mary Ann "Molly" Bramlett, child of Lucy Bray and Josiah Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S. C. She died Aug. 17, 1927. She married Elisha Simpson "E. S." Smith. He was born Oct. 23, 1840. He died Feb. 28, 1917. He served as a Confederate soldier in the Butler Guards during the Civil War/War Between the States.
   John Thomas Bramlett, child of Lucy Bray and Josiah Bramlett, was born Feb. 3, 1843, in Greenville Co., S. C. He died in December 1925 in Greenville Co., S. C., and was buried in Springwood Cemetery. He married Nancy J. “Nannie” Howell.
Judge John Thomas Bramlett
A name which has long been eminently associated with the legal profession in Greenville is that of Judge Jno. T. Bramlett. This gentleman was born in the county on February 3rd, 1843. His parents were Josiah and Lucy Bray Bramlett. The Judge received his early education in the old field schools of the county, and when he was eighteen years of age, he entered the Confederate army. He served with the forces until September 1862, when he was wounded and released. Upon his return home after this he first worked at odd jobs and paid his way through twelve months more of school. After that he went into the farming profession, which he has made his chief interest through life. He was elected to the legislature in 1884, and re-elected in 1894 and 1896. He was elected Probate Judge in 1902 and is now serving his third term in that capacity. Judge Bramlett is a member of the Methodist Church, and is one of the most highly respected men both in his profession and in his church. In 1866 he married Miss Nannie J. Howell. --Special Business Section, The Greenville News, 1911.

Representative J. T. Bramlett of the South Carolina General Assembly was present at a reception at the South Carolina Confederate Home in Columbia, S. C., in 1922: “About three hundred guests enjoyed a beautiful reception at the South Carolina Confederate Home given by the three Chapters of Columbia and the ‘Girls of the 60’s’ in compliment to the members of the General Assembly. The affair was an expression of appreciation to the legislators for the appropriation made last year for improving the Home and as an opportunity of allowing them to see the result of their expenditures. The whole institution was thrown open to the visitors, who inspected all the departments, including the model infirmary. Confederate flags and pine tops, jars of red poinsettias, and white narcissi were decorations used to give Southern colors. In the dining room there was a frieze of flags entirely around the wall, in addition to red and white flowers. The veterans of the Home, some of them wearing their gray uniforms, were cordial and gracious hosts of the occasion. In the receiving line were Gov. R. A. Cooper, with Mrs. Cooper...and three Confederate veterans, who are members of the General Assembly--Senator Jeremiah Smith, and Representatives J. T. Bramlett and J. G. Greer.” --Confederate Veteran, April 1922, 154.
  
   William D. Bramlett, child of Sarah D. Dacus and Reuben Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S. C. He died and was buried in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
   Nathaniel D. "Nat" Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
   John Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
   Allen Turner Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
   Margaret J. Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
   James W. Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
   Elias Andrew "Andy" Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
   Mary A. Elizabeth Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
   Robert Hugh/Hulett "Bob" Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
   Alcey Bramlett, sixth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Dec. 5, 1792, in Laurens Co., S. C. Alcey's birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She married and her family settled in Mississippi.
   John Wesley Bramlett, seventh child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born June 4, 1795, in Laurens Co., S. C. John's birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by his brother Reuben. He settled in Gilmer Co., Ga.
   Mildred "Milley" Bramlett, eighth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Jan. 14, 1797, at Bethel Camp Ground, Greenville Co., S. C., according to grandson Julien Potter Wooten. Milley's birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben.
   Julien Potter Wooten, a resident of Washington, D. C., where he worked as a government employee, made a trip to Greenville County to visit his grandmother's birthplace. His four-page unpublished history dated Greenville, S. C., Feb. 10, 1886, contains some valuable information. His reference to John's brothers Henry III and Reuben (author's direct ancestor) is priceless since Bible records have not been found for their parents and siblings. However, some material needs clarification due to mistaken memory, noted below in brackets:
I have been today in the midst of the Bramlettes, the relations of my grandmother Potter, whose maiden name was Mildred Bramlettte. I have been down to Bethel Campground about 10 miles south of Greenville, and have seen the places of her birth, childhood, and early womanhood, and have the following of my family history from my great uncle Elias Bramlette and my great-aunt Susan Bramlet, the latter of whom has never married. My great-grandfather, John Bramlet, and his wife, Mary Peake, were born and married in Farqua [Fauquier] County, Virginia, and moved to Bethel Campground, Greenville County, S. C. in 178-. [John's obituary indicates he and Mary moved to South Carolina after their marriage circa 1784-1785 in Fauquier Co., Va. They are in the 1790 census for Laurens Co., S. C., and moved into Greenville County circa 1797, before 1799.] His brothers, Henry and Reuben, moved from Virginia about the same time to Elbert County, Georgia, and Indiana [sic: Illinois] respectively. A grandson of Reuben was afterwards governor of that state. [Henry Bramlett III, 1755-1830, moved into Laurens Co., S. C., by 1775-1776; and Reuben, 1757-1844 (direct ancestor of author) was in South Carolina serving on the Indian Line as a soldier during the American Revolution in 1778 or 1779 and returned to Virginia. He and his wife, Elizabeth Brown, and first child, Benjamin, moved to Laurens Co., S. C., by 1787, when their second child, Henry "Harry" Bramlett was born there. Reuben and family moved to Christian Co., Ky., by 1801 and later settled in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill., in 1818. Reuben did not live in adjacent Indiana, and no Bramlett served as governor of that state. However, Thomas Elliott Bramlette, son of Ambrose Shrewsbury Bramlette and grandson of Revolutionary War veteran James Bramlette Sr. and great-grandson of Rev. William Bramblett Jr., did serve as governor of Kentucky in 1863-1867. See his history below. (Rev. William Bramblett Jr. is believed to be brother of Henry Bramlett Sr. who is direct ancestor of John, Henry III, Reuben and others. Gov. Bramlette's father Ambrose is a cousin of John, Henry III and Reuben.)] John Bramlet was born May 17, 1764, and died August, 1855, at his home in South Carolina. He was a patriarch of the Methodist Church, South, and much beloved and honored by the community as a sturdy farmer and gentleman of the olden times. He raised thirteen children: William, who was a Methodist preacher, lived and died in Greenville, S. C.; Margaret, who was married to Mr. Gamblen and moved to Hall County, Georgia; Nathan, also to Hall County, Ga.; Nancy, who married Mr. Dacus and moved to Octibika County, Miss.; Reuben, who lived and died in Greenville, S. C.; Alcy, who married Mr.. Hall and moved to Gwinnet County, Miss. [Ga.]; John W. moved to Gilmore [Gilmer] County, Ga.; Mildred, my grandmother; Rosa, who married a Mr. Franks and lived and died in Laurens County, S. C.; Mary, also in Laurens County, S. C.; Henry, who moved to Franklin County, Ga., and thence to Chickisaw County, Miss.; Susan, unmarried, still living here; and Elias also. I have spent a day with each of them: both of excellent memory and good health, each some eighty odd years of age. My grandmother, Mildred Bramlett, was born at Bethel Campground, South Carolina, in 1797; became a member of the Methodist Church when about 16 years of age, the most prominent characteristic of her youth and maidenhood was her all pervading piety. As Uncle Elias told me very proudly, she was the most beautiful shouter he ever heard....
 End of page 1...


Julien served as a soldier during World War I, survived, and returned to his work in D. C. He apparently did not marry.

   Rosanah “Rosey” “Rosa” Bramlett, ninth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born March 9, 1798, in Greenville Co., S. C. Rosey's birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She married and lived in Laurens Co., S. C.
   Mary Bramlett, tenth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Nov. 15, 1799, in Greenville Co., S. C. Mary's birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She married and lived in Laurens Co., S. C.
   Henry Bramlett, eleventh child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Aug. 3, 1801, in Greenville Co., S. C. Henry's birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by his brother Reuben. Henry settled in Mississippi. He died June 7, 1879, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried at Old Free Will, now William Springs Church of God Cemetery. He married Martha "Patsy" Gober on Feb. 21, 1822. She was born June 1, 1801, in Franklin Co., Ga., the daughter of Elizabeth Burns and William Gober. She died Aug. 29, 1861, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried in Old Free Will/William Springs Church of God Cemetery. Their children include Elizabeth, John Wesley, Martha, Thomas Franklin, Mildred Bramlett.

   Elizabeth Bramlett, child of Martha "Patsy" Gober and Henry Bramlett, was born July 22, 1823, in Georgia. She died Oct. 18, 1898, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried in William Springs Church of God Cemetery. She married Andrew Jackson Morgan. He was born in 1818. He died in 1889 in Choctaw County and was buried in William Springs Church of God Cemetery. Their children include Georgia Ann, Andrew Jackson "Jack" and Belle Morgan.

   John Wesley Bramlett, child of Martha "Patsy" Gober and Henry Bramlett, was born March 5, 1826, in Franklin Co., Ga. He died Aug. 15, 1915, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried there in Old Antioch Cemetery. He married Malinda Isha. She was born Aug. 11, 1827. She died in/after 1853 in Mississippi. Their children include William H. and Mary Eliza Bramlett.


   William H. Bramlett, child of John Wesley and Malinda Isha Bramlett, was born May 11, 1847, in Choctaw Co., Miss. He died Aug. 23, 1906, in Mississippi and was buried in William Springs Church of God Cemetery. He married Calpernia Fredonia Henderson. She was born Dec. 4, 1848, the daughter of George Milton Henderson. Calpernia died Feb. 6, 1939, at the Confederate Veterans Home near Biloxi, Harrison Co., Miss., where she lived with her second husband, Jeptha Spruill Eiland, whom she married circa 1909. He was born in 1843 and died in 1934. Calpernia and William's children are Laura Bramlett Burton, 1870-1918, and James A. Bramlett, 1883-1962.


Mary Eliza Bramlett and William Harrison Jeffcoat tombstone in Dacus Cemetery,
 courtesy Dacus-Bramlett descendant Patricia Dacus of Baldwin Co., Ala.

   Mary Eliza Bramlett, child of John Wesley and Malinda Isha Bramlett, was born Jan. 30, 1853. She died June 9, 1939, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried there at Dacus Cemetery. She married William Harrison Jeffcoat Sr. He was born June 30, 1843, in Alabama, the son of Nancy Clair Dendy and Henry John Jeffcoat. William died Dec. 20, 1911, and was buried at Dacus Cemetery. Their children include William Harrison Jr., Beulah, Mary Ella, Emma Donie, Mattie C. Jeffcoat.

Susannah Bramlett’s tombstone inscription, Bethel United Methodist Church, photo by Deborah G. Dennis

   Susannah “Susan” Bramlett, twelfth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Jan. 11,1804, in Greenville Co., S. C. Susan's birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She did not marry. She died Dec. 21, 1892, and was buried in the same plot with her parents and shares the above inscribed tombstone with them in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S. C.

Elias and Adaline Ashmore Bramlett's tombstone, courtesy Robin Farley Dixson
   Elias Bramlett, thirteenth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born June 4, 1807, in Greenville Co., S. C. His birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by his brother Reuben. He died Dec. 4, 1888, in Greenville County and was buried in Bramlett Family Cemetery on Kitty Hawk Road in the Donaldson Air Force Base Center. He married Adaline Ashmore. She was born Nov. 14, 1816, the daughter of Martha E. Durant and Walter Ashmore. Adaline died Feb. 5, 1885, and was buried in Bramlett Cemetery. Elias and Adaline's children are John Walter Olin and Olivia Bramlett.

   John Walter Olin Bramlett was born Sept. 11, 1842, in Greenville Co., S. C. He died Dec. 15, 1875, and was buried in Bramlett Cemetery.

Graves of Olivia Bramlett and William P. Hutchings marked by large tombstone above and


below in closeup, Elias Bramlett Cemetery, Greenville Co., S. C., courtesy Robin Farley Dixson


   Olivia Bramlett was born July 12, 1844, in Greenville Co., S. C. She died Sept. 10, 1910, and was buried in Bramlett Cemetery. She married William P. Hutchings. He was born Oct. 13, 1840. He died April 24, 1881, and was buried in Bramlett Cemetery. Their child, Infant Daughter Hutchings, born May 11, 1868, and died May 22, 1868, also is buried there and shares the marker with them.
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Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Nathan Bramlett and Elizabeth Gray
Father Nathan Bramlett, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born July 20, 1766, in Fauquier Co., Va. He died at age 74 on March 19, 1841, in Laurens Co., S. C., and was buried in the old section of Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery near Gray Court. He married Elizabeth Gray circa 1789 in South Carolina. Elizabeth was born in January 1765, the daughter of Ailsa Hiatt and John Gray Sr. Elizabeth and her sister Ailsey, who married Reuben Bramlett, son of Henry Bramlett III, are named as heirs in their father John's estate records in Union Co., S. C. Their brother Jesse Gray administered the estate and other siblings were named as heirs as well. Elizabeth died July 17, 1844, and was buried beside Nathan in Bramlett Church Cemetery. Elizabeth and Nathan each have an inscribed tombstone. Nathan’s inscription indicates “at the early age of 16 he attached himself to the Church” (in 1781 or 1782, the approximate date of the founding of Bramlett Church, according to information sent to Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette by Nathan’s brother Father John Bramlett Greenville County.)

Nathan Bramlett’s tombstone in the old section of Bramlett Church Cemetery, courtesy Robin Farley Dixson. Since Nathan and Elizabeth did not have children, the stone and inscription was provided by Nathan’s heirs--his wife and the South Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church South.

Nathan Bramlett’s tombstone before cleaning in Bramlett Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis
SACRED to the memory of NATHAN BRAMLETT who was born on the 20th day of July, 1766, and died on the 19th day of March, 1841, leaving an affectionate wife and many relations and friends to bemourn their irreparable loss. At the early age of sixteen he attached himself to the Church and lived an humble follower of Jesus Christ. For fifty years he was a pious Class Leader of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a kind & affectionate husband, a sincere friend and a devoted Christian. He attained in society an enviable station, as a neighbour he was kind & obliging, as a Christian meek and humble, as a husband he was tender and affectionate through all the various changes in life. He maintained a high dignified and spotless character. He dedicated his whole estate to the support of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and finally died in the triumph of that Christian faith which he so eminently possessed.

Detail above from Elizabeth Gray Bramlett’s tombstone in the old section of Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery features a chrysalis and butterfly, symbolic of religious and spiritual development from youth to adulthood as a beautiful metamorphosis. Inscription: "It is sown a natural body. It is raised a spiritual body. Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Bramlett." Image by Deborah G. Dennis
SACRED to the Memory of ELIZABETH BRAMLETT Born January 1765 Died July 17th 1844. She Was a Member of the Methodist Church Fifty Five Years and After Adorning Her Character With a Christian Life She Died in the Faith. This Stone Erected By Order of the So. Ca. Conference of the M. E. Church South and Let Her Own Good Works Praise Her in the Gate.
Nathan and Elizabeth apparently did not have children who survived. No children are enumerated with them in any census data between 1790 and 1840 or named or mentioned in Nathan's estate or will, in which he names two slaves who are not identified as heirs: James and Billy (Will Papers, 495; Estate Papers, Packets 89-91, 92-111). The two slaves and four others are named in the inventory and appraisal of Nathan's estate, below.
   Nathan's March 11, 1839, will bequeathed his entire personal and real estate to his wife and at her death to the Methodist Episcopal Church South, prompting a lawsuit by some of his sister Marianne Bramlett Burdette’s surviving grown children after Nathan died in 1841 in Laurens County. The following persons were cited to appear in court March 9, 1842, to participate in the lawsuit: Elizabeth Bramlett (wife of Nathan) and the Burdett “Heirs at Law”: John Burdett, Molly Burdett, Elsey (Ailsey) Burdett, William Burdett and Elizabeth Burdett Hand (wife of) Robert Hand as well as witnesses David Higgins, James French and James B. Higgins, who represented the church. (The Burdetts are documented in Bible records as children of Marianne and Frederick.) The initial Burdett court filing, titled "In the Matter of N. Bramblett's Will} Protest & Grounds," was presented by the law firm Irby & Young:
...one of the Heirs at Law of Nathan Bramblett decd protests against the paper presented for probate bearing date the 11 March 1839 being established according to law as the will of the said Nathan Bramblett upon the following grounds: -- 1st Because the said paper is not the last will and Testament of the said Nathan Bramblett -- 2nd Because the said Nathan Bramblett became of old age and imbecility of mind was incompetent at the time of Executing said paper to make a will -- 3rd Because the Execution of said paper was procured by improper and undue influence -- 4th Because the said Will is void for uncertainty....
Since Marianne’s five grown children were identified by attorneys Irby & Young as Nathan’s legal “Heirs at Law,” they therefore were close biological relatives--nieces and nephews. The Burdett heirs may have helped their Uncle Nathan farm in his later years and apparently believed he would leave his estate to them. However, they lost their lawsuit, and the church inherited the entire estate when Elizabeth died in 1844. An Inventory of the Estate of Nathan Bramblett, deceased, which was appraised on June 16, 1842, was filed in Laurens County Court on June 21, 1842, by James B. Higgins, David Higgins and James French. The inventory and appraisal included Nathan's shotgun 15.00, a waggon and kind gear 35.00, a gig and harness 20.00 and the following:
Land: 64 acres of land $1640.00 Slaves: 1 negro man James 125.00 - 1 Do William 200.00 - 1 Boy Harrison 500.00 - 1 Do William 300.00 - 1 Do Robert 275.00 - 1 negro woman Sarah 400.00 Livestock: 4 horses 195.00 - 31 hogs appraised at $46.50 cts - 8 head cattle 36.00 - 8 head of sheep 10.00  Farm Equipment: 1 set blacksmith's tools 15.00 - 2 scythes & ? 3.00 - 4 augers, foot adz, handsaw, 3 drawing shives, pr steelyards, square fork, 2 chisels, 5 harrow teeth 3.00 - 6 axes 11 hoes 11.37 1/2 - 3 pr. gears 2.00 - 1 fan & 1 cutting knife 12.00 - 1/2 cross cut saw 1.50 - 2 shovels and log chains 2.50 - 4 hogs heads & barrel 2.50 Household Items: 3 spinning wheels 5.00 - 1 loom 1.00 - 1 walnut chest 10.00 - 1 Do bureau 15.00 - 1 candle stand 2.00 - 1 folding leaf table 8.00 - 9 chairs 4.00 - 1 cupboard & contents 25.50 - 4 beds & steads and furniture 50.00 - kitchen furniture 15.00 - 1 pr andirons, shovel & tongs 2.00 - 1 clock 15.00 - 1 lot books 5.00
The church's "Petition & Order of Sale on the Estate of Nathan Bramblett, Deceased" was filed July 29, 1844, ten days after Elizabeth's death (South Carolina Wills and Probate Records, p. 516).
Nathan's Devotion to the Methodist Church
   Nathan, who gave his entire estate to the church, was devoted to his religion. Nathan and his brother John officially joined the Methodist Church in 1780-1782 in Virginia or South Carolina. Recorded deeds indicate Margaret and sons Reuben and John were in Virginia in 1780 when or shortly after Henry II/Jr. died and their eldest son, Henry III, inherited the family plantation. She may have been in South Carolina and returned to Virginia after her husband died to help deal with legalities involving her home and Henry II/Jr.'s estate. John's obituary says he joined at age 16 (1780) and experienced a "powerful conversion" at age 18 (1782) at the home of their widowed mother (Margaret) in (Fauquier County) Virginia. Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt's Diary states Nathan with brothers Henry III and John and their mother, Margaret, founded Bramlett Methodist Church in 1780 or 1781. That is when Henry Bramlett III and his sister Marianne Bramlett Burdette were living in South Carolina. Margaret and her younger children were in Virginia in 1780, but she may have been in South Carolina earlier in the same year visiting grown children when Bramlett Church was founded there. Nathan is considered by some today to be the founder of the church since he and George Sims on June 2, 1807, sold to the trustees for $5 two acres of land to secure the church meeting house already in existence on the property. The building was situated on property owned by Nathan or once owned by Margaret after she relocated from Virginia in 1790 and bought a small farm adjacent to Nathan’s property, which he had settled on in or before 1789. Methodist Episcopal Bishop Francis Asbury in his Journal referred to the church in 1801 as “widow Bramblet’s meeting-house” and in 1802 as “Bramblet’s Chapel.” Nathan's original church land deed, recorded June 6, 1807, in Laurens County, documents the transfer of two acres on Zak’s Creek near Enoree River and the existing church building from trustees Nathan Bramlett and George Sims to Nathan’s brother-in-law and trustee Frederick Burditt/Burdette and other church trustees. 
State of South Carolina Know all men by these presents, That we Nathan Bramlett and George Sims -- both of the state aforesaid and District of Laurence, for an in consideration of the Sum of five Dollars, to us paid, by Frederick Burditt - Joel Fowler - Raughley Stone, Trustees, have granted, bargained, sold and Released, and by these presents do bargain, sell and Release, unto the sd Frederick Burditt, Joel Fowler, and Raughley Stone, Trustees, Two acres of Land Situate in the District of Laurence, and near the Enoree River and on a Creek called Zak’s Creek, beginning on a Turkey Oak, from thence to a White Oak, and from thence to a Spanish Oak, from thence to a White Oak, from thence to a Sassafas, the same being two Acres more or less, Together with all and Singular, the Rights, members, herediterments, and appurtenances to said premises, before mentioned, belonging or in any wise incident as appertaining, to have and to hold all and singular, the premises before mentioned, unto the Said Frederick Burditt, Joel Fowler, and Raughley Stone Trustees; and their successors in office for ever, for the purpose of Secureing a Meeting house, thereon Standing and to Remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
And we do hereby bind ourselves our heirs Executors and Administrators, to warrant and ever defend the title thereof - in fee simple, and the said Frederick Burditt Joel Fowler and Raughley Stone, Trustees, and their Successors in office for the use within mentioned, Witness our hands and Seals, this Second day of June, In the year of our Lord one thousand Eight hundred and Seven, and the thirty first and Second of the Independency of America - Signed and sealed ...Nathan Bramlett {Seal} George Sims {Seal} And delivered in Presents of us [Witnesses] Benjn Tradewell and John Burditt.
Nathan's brother-in-law and church trustee Frederick Burditt is the husband of Marianne Bramlett, and John Burditt is their son, the nephew of Nathan. The deed was recorded in Deed Book 26 on page 235 of Laurens County: 
State of South Carolina} Laurens District} Personaly appeared John Burditt before me and made oath in due form of law and saith that he was personaly present and Saw the within named Nathan Bramlett and George Sims sign and as ... and deliver the `within conveyance to the within named Frederick Burditt Raughley Stone and Joel Fowler for the use within mentioned and that the Reverend Benjamin Tradewell signed his name as witness to the same with himself Sworn to before me this 16th day of June 1807 John Burditt Sterling Tucker South Carolina} Laurens District} Registers Office I do hereby certify that the within Deed is duly recorded in Book 26 Page 235 as the law directs Examined & Certified this 6th day of June 1807 -- John Garlington, Rah C
A copy of the original June 2, 1807, deed, which was donated to the South Carolina Methodist Archives in 1912, includes a note at the bottom, which indicates the bishop visited Bramlett Church in 1799:
A Quarterly Conference was held at Bramlett’s by Bishop Asbury Nov. 9th and 10th, 1799 -- 113 years ago. Rev. Benj. Blanton was also present. This document by the consent of the trustees of Bramlett’s Church is tendered the Historical Society of the S. C. Conference. Nov. 26th 1912: J. M. Fridy
Note: Raughley Stone, trustee of Bramlett Church, and his Stone relatives who probably were early members of Bramlett Methodist Church came from Prince William/Fauquier Co., Va., circa 1773 to settle on land situated on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River in present day Laurens County. Their relationship to the Bramlett family is unknown. The Laurens County Stone family was headed by Mildredge “Mildred” “Millie” Corder (1730--1822) and John Stone (1727--1800). (Researchers believe John is the son of Nancy Bronaugh and Thomas Stone of Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va.) John `and Millie purchased 200 acres adjacent to William Bramblett’s 1773 land grant from William and Barbara Vaughn in 1775. As a Revolutionary War veteran, John Stone later also purchased 442 acres on a Branch of Beaver Dam Creek on Enoree River in Ninety-Six District on June 6, 1791 (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S213190, vol. 27, p. 157). John and Millie had several children named in his Jan. 26, 1797, will, proved March 17, 1800, in Laurens County: Nancy, William, Reuben, Raughley, Elias, Lewis Stone (Will Book A-a: 233).

Works Cited for Nathan Bramlett
Asbury, Rev. Francis. The Journal of the Rev. Francis Asbury, Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal church. New York: The Methodist Episcopal Church, N. Bangs and T. Mason, 1821. p. 40. 1801 references to Widow (Margaret) Bramblet, Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church, and reference to (Margaret's son) John Bramblet, regarding Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church: https://archive.org/stream/
--. The Journal. The Methodist Episcopal Church. p. 86. 1802 references to Nathan Bramblet, Bramlett Church -- “Bramblet's Chapel”: https://archive.org/stream/00612616.874.emory.edu/006 12616_874#page/n87/mode/2up.
Bramlet/Bramblett, Nathaniel “Nathan.” Estate. “Will Papers,” p. 495. Estate Papers, 1800-1867; General Index to Estate Papers, 1800-1931: South Carolina, Probate Court, Laurens County, packets 89-1 to 92-11, 1800-1931. Petition & Order of sale on the Estate of Nathan Bramblett Decd. Filed 29 July 1844 (South Carolina Wills and Probate Records, p. 516).
--. Land Deed to Bramlett Methodist Church Trustees. Herbert Hucks, Jr., Curator/Archivist, Historical Society, Commission on Archives and History, South Carolina Conference, The United Methodist Church Archives: Wofford College, Sandor Teaszler Library, Spartanburg, S. C. Nathan Bramlett's 1807 Deed secured the church meeting house already in existence on the property.
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Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Sarah Bramlett and Nicholas Ware Garrett

Sarah Bramlett, most likely child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born April 1, 1769, in Fauquier Co., Va. She died Dec. 30, 1851, in Laurens Co., S. C., and was buried in Warrior Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. She married Nicholas Ware Garrett, son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett II/Jr. Sarah is listed as the wife of Nicholas in "The Garrett Daybook," a record of Garrett Genealogy and Bible inscriptions of Edward and Ann and children. Researcher Agnes Elrod transcribed the text into a notebook in the early 1950s. Nicholas was born March 11, 1765. He died Jan. 2, 1846, and was buried in Warrior Creek Cemetery. Nicholas purchased 252 acres of land on branches of Warrior Creek on Enoree River in Ninety-Six Dist., S. C., on Feb. 23, 1792 (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S213190, vol. 28, p. 124). Neighbors included William Bramlet, James Higgins, John Vaughn.
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Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Nancy Bramlett and William Garrett
Nancy Bramlett, most likely child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. She married William Garrett, son of Ann West Owsley and Edward Garrett II/Jr. She married William Garrett, son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett II/Jr. Nancy is listed as the wife of William in "The Garrett Daybook," a record of Garrett Genealogy and Bible inscriptions of Edward and Ann and children. Researcher Agnes Elrod transcribed the text into a notebook in the early 1950s.
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Chapter 3:
Generation 4
WILLIAM BRAMBLETT and ELIZABETH UNKNOWN (GIST?)
(Children: Elizabeth, Enoch Sr., Sandford, Newton, Reuben, Henry)

William Bramblett, child of Unknown Wife and Henry Bramlett Sr., was born circa 1732 in Colonial Virginia. He died before Nov. 12, 1787, most likely in Laurens Dist., S. C., where he lived with his family. His burial place is unknown. He married a woman named Elizabeth, perhaps Gist, in Fauquier or Fairfax Co., Va. William farmed and paid taxes on 125 acres in the Southern Tax District in Fauquier County before he moved his family from Virginia. William and Elizabeth moved their growing family in 1773 to South Carolina to establish a plantation there on a 300-acre royal land grant in Royal Craven (now Laurens) County from Gov. William Bull and King George III. The amount of the acreage indicates they had three minor sons. (Grantees received 100 acres, their wives 50 acres and each minor son 50 acres. Sons of legal age were expected to apply for their own grants. The land grants at that time were awarded to white males to encourage them to populate areas where Indians were still living, not for military service.) William traveled from Cravens/Laurens County to Charleston, S. C., to sign a land memorial, essentially a tax receipt, when he paid his first taxes on the land grant in 1774.
South Carolina 315 Pursuant to a precept directed under the hand and seal of John Bremar Esq. Dep. Surveyor dated the 2d day Feb. 1773 I have admeasured & laid out unto William Bramblett a plantation or Tract of Land containing Three hundred acres in Craven County situate lying & being on a small Branch called the Beaver Dam of waters of Enoree River and Bounded E.ly [Easterly] by old land the name not none [known], & bounding Westerly by Vaughn's land, and bounded on all other sides by vacant Land, and hath such shape form and marks as the above plat represents. Certified under my hand this 26th Day of March 1773. James Wofford LS. (Colonial Plat Books: S213184, South Carolina Dept. of History and Archives)
William's name is included on South Carolina Jury Lists in 1778-1779. "William Bramblet" of Ninety-Six District would serve on the jury of the Upper Part of the Middle Division Between Broad and Saluda Rivers.
   After he died intestate, William's eldest son, Enoch Bramblett, inherited his estate through primogeniture. Enoch is named as William's "real Heir" on Nov. 12, 1787, when Enoch Sr. sold part of William's land grant to Thomas Higggins, husband of Enoch Sr.'s sister Elizabeth Bramblett Higgins. Enoch Sr.'s brother "Sandford Bramblet" witnessed and signed his name on the deed, which is recorded in Laurens County (DB-1:308-309). Other witnesses: John McElroy and David McElroy.
   Four of William and Elizabeth's children--Elizabeth Jr., Enoch Sr., Sandford, and Henry--appear with their mother, Elizabeth Sr., in recorded deeds. Sons Reuben and Henry are enumerated with her in the 1790 census, and Henry and wife in 1800, and Sandford and Newton appear as heads of their own families in census data in 1790 and 1800.
   Elizabeth Bramblett, child of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, was born in Fauquier Co., Va. She died in Gwinnett Co., Ga. She married Thomas Higgins in Laurens Co., S. C.
   Enoch Bramblett Sr., child of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, was born circa 1755-1757 in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in his nineties after the 1850 census in Forsyth Co., Ga., and was buried in Friendship Baptist Church Cemetery. Enoch is the eldest son of William and Elizabeth. He is named as William's "real Heir" in a 1787 Laurens Co., S. C., deed referencing the sale of part of his father's royal land grant. James Bramlett who married Jane is one son of Enoch Sr. Another son is Henry Bramlett, born circa 1803 in South Carolina.
   Henry Bramlett, child of Enoch Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1803 in Laurens Co., S. C. He married Matilda. They moved to Lafayette Co., Miss., after 1845 and back to Georgia by 1860. "Henry Bramlett," 47, born South Carolina, and wife, Matilda, 44, born Georgia, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Lafayette Co., Miss., with three grown and minor children: J. Robert, 19; Elizabeth M., 12; and Sarah T., 5, all born Georgia (NARA Film ). Next door: son "Joseph S. Bramlett," 27, farmer, and wife, Martha, 20, both born Georgia, and child Sarah A., 1, born Mississippi. Henry and Matilda's children include Joseph S., James, J. Robert, Elizabeth M., Sarah T. Bramlett.
   Sandford Bramblett, child of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He probably died in Tennessee. "Sandford Bramblet" signed a deed as a witness on Nov. 12, 1787, when his brother "Enoch Bramblet" sold part of their father's South Carolina land grant to their brother-in-law Thomas Higgins, husband of Elizabeth Bramblett Higgins. Sanford and some of his children may have lived in Maury and Obion Co., Tenn.
   Old Newton Bramblett, child of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, was born circa 1765-1767 in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Laurens Co., S. C., after Nov. 13, 1841, when he wrote a deed of land to his grandchildren. His wife, Mary, is named in the deed. He married Mary before 1790. Several deeds and census data indicate Newton lived in Laurens County until he died. “Newton Bromlet,” white male 16 and up, born before 1774, is listed in the 1790 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes three females: his wife, Mary, and two daughters: daughter (unknown) and daughter (unknown) (NARA Film M637:11:446). “Newton Bramblett” witnessed a deed in Laurens County on July 27, 1799, when James Delong and wife, Agness, (also identified in the deed as Nancy Delong) sold 62 acres of land to John Patterson for $100. The land, part of a Jan. 22, 1785, grant to Benjamin Kilgore, was located on a small branch of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree Rver, bounded by property owned by Nathan Higgins and Isaac Gray. William Ball also witnessed the deed, which was recorded by Starling Tucker, J.P., in Laurens County (DB-F:504). (The Newton Bramblett who witnessed the 1799 Delong-Patterson deed was born before 1778, since he had to be at least age 21 to witness a legal document. “Newton Bramlet,” 26-45, born between 1755 and 1774, is listed in the area protected by Capt. Samuel Parson’s Company, Enoree Regiment, Upper Battalion, in the 1800 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 26-45 (wife, Mary) and two children: a female 10-16, born 1784-90, (daughter) and a male under 10, born 1790-1800 (Enoch, born 1790-94) (NARA Film M32:50:15A). “Newton Bramblett” bought 100 acres of land from Reuben Higgins on March 20, 1800. “Newton Bramblet,” 45 and over, born before 1765, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over (wife, Mary) and two children: a male 16-26, born 1784-94, (Enoch, born 1790-94) and a male under 10, born 1800-10 (Larkin, born 1802-04) (NARA Film M252:61:72). “Newton Bramlet,” over 45, born before 1775, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes one grown child: a male 16-18, born 1802-04, (Larkin) (NARA Film M33:121:43). Both were employed in agriculture. Newton’s wife, Mary, must have been missed by the census taker. Newton and Mary’s son Enoch heads his own family in that census. Newton Bramblett bought 187 acres of land in Laurens County from Ezekial Dunlap on Oct. 11, 1822 (DB-L:68). “N. Bramblett” 50-60, ist listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with a female 50-60 (wife, Mary) and three others: a female 20-30, a male 15-20 (Larkin) and a female under 5 (NARA Film ). “Newton Bramlet,” 70-80, born circa 1760-70, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with a female 70-80 (wife, Mary) (NARA Film ).
   “Newton Bramblett Senr.” transferred 33 acres on Reedy River in Laurens County “for & in consideration of the nearness of kin & blood--$5 cash” to “Melmouth Bramlett, my grandson” on Oct. 18, 1841. The land was bounded by land owned by J. F. Kern, F. Allison, J. Farrow, T. D. Childress and Newton Bramblett. S. C. Brown and Wiley Bramblett witnessed the deed, which was recorded March 7, 1842 (DB-O:93). (The designation “Senior” was used to identify Newton as the elder of three Newton Brambletts in the same family, not necessarily to indicate he had a son named Newton Bramblett Jr. 
Newton Bramblett To Melmouth Bramblett Deed 33 Acres
State of South Carolina}
Laurens District}
Know all men by these presents that I Newton Bramblett Senr of the state and district for and in consideration of the nearness of Kin and blood likewise five Dollars in Cash paid to me the Recpt whereof I hereby acknowledged have granted given, bargained and sold to Melmouth Bramblett my Grandson and do by these presents grant Give, bargain & sell and release unto the said Melmouth Bramblett all that tract or parcel of land Situate lying and being in the district aforesaid on the waters of Reedy River fork bounded by lands of J. F. Kern F. Allison J. Farrow and Newton Bramblett and T. D. Childress beginning on a red Oak 3 X thence S.75W. 3650 chs. to P Oak 3 X thence S. 11. W. 450 ch. to a stake 3 X thence S. 86 35 to a Stake 3 X thence N. 1450 to the beginning Containing thirty three (33) Acres more or less Together with all and Singular the rights members hereditaments and appurtenances to the said premises belonging or in any wise incident or appertaining thereto to have and to hold all and singular the premises before mentioned unto the said Melmouth Bramblett his heirs and assigns forever and I do hereby bind myself my heirs executors administrators &c to warrant and forever defend all and singular the said premises unto the said Melmouth his heirs and asssigns against myself my heirs and assigns against no other person witness my hand and seal this 18th day of October one thousand Eight hundred & forty one and in the 66th year of the Independence of the united States of America Signed sealed and delivered acknowledged in presence of Newton Bramblett(Seal)
S C Brown
Wiley his X mark Bramblet
South Carolina}
Laurens District}
Personally Came S. C. Brown this day before me and deposeth that he was present and did see Newton Bramblett execute the within Deed to Melmouth Bramblett for the uses and purposes specified therein and that he likewise saw Wiley Bramblett subscribe by making his mark as witness with himself to the same sworn and subscribed before me this 22d Nov. 1841 S C Brown M. C. Evins MLD
A true Record of the Original Deed March 7th 1842 John Garlington R.M.C.
Delivered to.
“Newton Bramblett Senior” also wrote a deed Nov. 13, 1841, to transfer 132 acres of land that he lived on to the heirs of his deceased son Larkin: Larkin Jr., Sarah (Selah?), William H., John C. (actually L.?) and James H. Bramblett. The land, to be transferred after Newton and Mary died, bounded property owned by Newton’s grandson Melmoth Bramblett, which Newton had given him in March 1841. William Gilbert, J. M. Childress and J. L. Childress witnessed the deed, which was recorded the same day (DB-0:73).
Newton Bramblett To Heirs of L [Larkin] Bramlett Deed of Gift 132 Acres State of South Carolina} Laurens District} Know all men by these presents that I Newton Bramblet Senior for an[d] in consideration of the love and good will I bear to the Heirs of Larkin Bramblett Deceased that is to say Larkin Bramblet, Sarah [actually Selah?] Bramblett, William H. Bramblett, John C. (actually L.?--John Lanora Bramblett?) Bramblett, James H. Bramblett, I this day do give and Bequeath unto the above named Children all that plantation or Tract of Land containing One hundred and Thirty-two Acres be the same more or less whereon I Newton Bramblett now lives. Beginning on a White Oak thence S 20 E 34 ch. 50 Li. to a White Oak 3 & one bounded by a tract of land whereon Spilsby E. Brown now Lives thence S. 75. W. 34 ch to a spanish Oak 3 X nm Bounded by Melmouth Bramblet thence N 35 W 27 ch 50 Li to White Oak 3 X nm Bounded by John Farrow thence down the creek with the courses of the water 51 ch and 50 Links to the White Oak to the beginning to contain one hundred & 32 Acres be it more or less this deed to take full power at the decease of my self and my wife Mary in testimony of the above gift I a[s]sign my name to the same this November the 13th day one thousand Eight hundred & forty one Signed Sealed and delivered in the presence of us. Newton his X mark Bramblett (seal) William Gilbert J M Childress J L Childress South Carolina} Laurens District} Personally came J. L. Childress before me this day and being sworn deposeth that he was present and saw Newton Bramblett execute the within instrument for the uses and purposes specified and that he did see William Gilbert and J. M. Childress subscribe their names as witnesses with himself the same Sworn and subscribed the 15 November 1841 before me M. P. Evins, MLD J L Childress A true Record of the Original Deed this 13th Nov. 1841 John Garlington RMC Delivd. to Wm. Holbert January 5th 1842 J W Simpson
(Two Newtons who were referred to as Newton Bramblett Jr.: 1) a nephew? of Newton Sr., Newton Bramblett, born circa 1794-96 in Laurens District and died May 25, 1872, in Gwinnett Co., Ga., who married Oney Yeargin in Laurens District in 1819 and moved to Georgia by 1830, and 2) a grandson of Newton Sr.: Newton Bramblett who was born circa 1817-19 and died in 1862, perhaps while serving as a soldiier during the War Between the States. He married a woman named Catherine “Catsy” circa 1835, and they lived nearby in Greenville County in 1840-60.) Newton Sr. and Mary’s children are Daughter, Daughter, Enoch and Larkin Bramblett.
   Daughter Bramblett?, first? child of Newton and Mary Bramblett, was born circa 1784-90 in Laurens Co., S.C. She may be one of three females (wife and two daughters) enumerated with Newton in the 1790 census.
   Daughter Bramblett, first/second child of Newton and Mary Bramblett, was born circa 1784-90 in Laurens Co., S.C. She is enumerated with her parents in 1790 and 1800 census records. She may have married or died by 1810: she is not listed with her parents in the census that year.
   Enoch Bramblett, second/third child of Newton and Mary Bramblett, was born circa 1790-94 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there circa 1832. Enoch is enumerated with his parents in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens County. Enoch first married circa 1810-13. His first wife, name unknown, died after the 1820 census, probably between 1820 and 1822. “Enoch Bramlett“ witnessed a deed in Laurens County on March 9, 1818, when Larkin Stapp sold some land to Thomas Goodwin (DB-K:213). This land was adjacent to property owned by Enoch Bramlett, Larkin Stapp, Thomas Goodwin and James and Reuben Holcombe. “Enoch Bramlett” witnessed a deed in Laurens County on Jan. 7, 1819, when Ezekiel Dunlap sold land on Big Durbin Creek of the Enoree River to Harris Goodwin (DB-K:245). “Enoch Bramlet,” 26-45, born between 1775 and 1794, employed in agriculture, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 26-45 (first wife) and five children: two females under 10, born 1810-20 (daughters, names unknown) and three males under 10, born 1810-20 (Reuben?, Harris, Abraham or Newton) (NARA Film M33:121:12). Enoch second married a woman named Martha “Patsy” before 1823. Some sources indicate her maiden name is Goodwin. Descendant Miles P. Bramblett indicated to descendant/historian Tim Howard of Chatsworth, Ga., that Enoch married twice because his sons Harris and Larkin were known to be half brothers. Martha “Patsy” was born circa 1780-90. She died in South Carolina sometime after the census was taken there in 1850. “Enoch Bramlett” is listed in the 1829 South Carolina Census in Laurens County as head of a family of eight. “E. Bramblett,” 40-50, born circa 1780-90, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Laurens County as head of a family that includes a female 20-30 (second wife, Martha “Patsy”) and ten children: a female 10-15, born 1815-20 (daughter), a female 5-10, born 1820-25 (daughter), a female under 5, born 1825-30 (daughter Mary?), two males 15-20, born 1810-15 (Abraham?, Harris); two males 10-15, born 1815-20 (Newton, Thomas?); two males 5-10, born 1820-25 (Larkin, Wiley); and one male under 5, born 1825-30 (unknown). Enoch died circa 1832 and his wife headed the family in 1840: “Martha Bramlet,” 50-60, born circa 1780-90, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with four children: a female 20-30, born 1810-20 (daughter); a male 15-20, born 1820-25 (Larkin); a male 10-15, born 1825-30 (Wiley); and a male 5-10, born 1830-35 (Thomas Melmoth). “Patsey Bramlett,” 50/52, born in South Carolina, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens County with one child: (Thomas) Melmoth, 19, born in South Carolina.
   Enoch's children most likely include Abraham, Harris, Daughter, Daughter, Newton, Reuben, Larkin, Wiley, Mary, Thomas Melmoth Bramblett.
Son Abraham? Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1810-1815 in Laurens Co., S. C. One Abraham Bramlett was mentioned in a court record as a purchaser at an estate sale in 1831 in Laurens County.
Harris Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1810-1815 in Laurens Co., S. C.
Daughter Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1815-1820 in Laurens Co., S. C.
Daughter Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1820 in Laurens Co., S. C.
Newton Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1815-1820 in Laurens Co., S. C. 
Son Reuben? Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1815-1820 in Laurens Co., S. C.
Larkin Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and second wife, Martha "Patsy" Unknown, was born circa 1820-1825 in Laurens Co., S. C.
Wiley Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and second wife, Martha "Patsy" Unknown, was born circa 1825 in Laurens Co., S. C.
Daughter Mary Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and second wife, Martha "Patsy" Unknown, was born circa 1825-1830 in Laurens Co., S. C.
Thomas Melmoth Bramblett, child of Enoch Bramblett and second wife, Martha "Patsy" Unknown, was born circa 1832 in Laurens Co., S. C.

   Reuben Bramblett, child of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, was born circa 1765 in Fauquier Co., Va. He probably died in Gwinnett Co., Ga., where he lived in 1840. "Reuben Bramlett," 75, is listed as a Revolutionary or Military veteran and head of the house in which he lived in the June 1, 1840, Census of Pensioners for Gwinnett Co., Ga. The population schedule for that same census lists him with a different age. If a Revolutionary War soldier and patriot, he most likely served between age 10 and 18 from South Carolina where he lived with parents and siblings. No record of a pension for him has been found. He may have served in a different war. He married a woman named Ann.
   Henry Bramblett, child of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, was born in Fauquier Co., Va., or Laurens Dist., S. C. He probably died in Gwinnett Co., Ga., where he lived in 1830. He married a woman named Sarah. Her Bible records name her children.
   A grandson of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, young Newton Bramblett, a gunsmith and farmer by occupation in Georgia, was born in Laurens Co., S. C. He moved to Franklin Co., Ga., where he served as a soldier in the War of 1812. His military records name his wife and indicate he returned to South Carolina to marry Oney Yeargin there. She was born in Laurens County. They settled in Lawrenceville, Gwinnett Co., Ga., where they later died and were buried. One child is Isaac Newton Jasper Bramblett.

 Elizabeth Ewing and Isaac Newton Jasper Bramblett

  Isaac Newton Jasper Bramblett married Elizabeth Ewing. They lived in Gwinnett Co., Ga. He served as a Confederate soldier and lost an arm in battle during the Civil War/War Between the States.
--

Chapter 3:
Generation 4
REUBEN BRAMBLETT SR. and MARGARET “PEGGY” UNKNOWN (DARNALL?)
(Children: Hugh, Henry, William, Susannah, Reuben Jr., Lewis, Mary "Polly," Mildred "Milly")

Reuben Bramblett Sr., child of Unknown and Henry Bramlett Sr., was born circa 1734 in King George or Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va. He died in late 1806 or early 1807 in Bourbon Co., Ky. He wrote his will on Dec. 10, 1806, in Bourbon County (WB-1:198-201).
Reuben Bramblett Sr.s Will
In the name of God Amen. I Reuben Bramblett Senr. of Bourbon County and State of Kentucky being very sick and weak in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be given unto God calling to mind the mortality of any body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul to the hands of Almighty God that gave it and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in a decent Christian burial at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God. And as touching such worldly estate where with it has pleased God to bless me in this life. I give demise and dispose of the same in the manner and form following. First I give and bequeath to my well beloved wife Peggy Bramblett my negroe woman named Dicey and my negroe boy named Manuel during her natural life and at her death both they and their increase to descend to John Grinstead my sun in law & Hugh Bramblett my sun in an equal proportion. Also I give & bequeath to my well beloved wife Peggy Bramblett one hundred acres of land including the place whereon I now live with all the household furniture farming utensials, horses, cattle & stock of every kind that is in my procession or claimed by me at this time during her natural life, and at her death the land on which I now live as aforesaid is by this my last will and testament to decent to my sun Hugh Bramblett & the ballance of the property that is to say the horses, cattle, and stock of every kind together with household furniture and farming utensils is to be sold and equally divided amongst my three children in South Carolina Viz Reuben Bramblett jr., Milly Robertson and Polly Robertson in equal proportion. I also give and bequeath to my sun in law John Grinstead my sun William Bramblett and my sun Lewis Bramblett one hundred acres of land each out the land I claim from the heirs of Martin Pickett deceased if so much should be obtained by virtue of said claim and if not it is my will and desire that my four children to whom I have given the land aforesaid shall have an equal proportion of what may be obtained wheather it be land money or otherwise. I also will and bequeath to my sun Henry Bramblett two negroes to wit one boy named Daniel and a girl named Sally. I also will and bequeath to my sun William Bramblett one negroe girl named Winney. I also ordain constitute and appoint John Ginstead Henry Bramblett and Hugh Bramblett executors of this my last will and testament. It is also my will that all debts due to me shall be collected by my executors and as far as necessary applied to the discharge of any just debts and whatever ballance then may be remaining it is my will that my beloved wife Peggy Bramblett shall have the use at her discretion. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this tenth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and six. Reuben Bramblett Signed sealed and acknowledged in the presents of us} Will Mitchell Edward Riley Reuben Bramblett jr.
Hugh Bramblett and Nancy Ann Turner
Hugh Bramblett, child of Margaret "Peggy" Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in 1818 in Bourbon Co., Ky. His burial place is unknown. He married Nancy Ann Turner. Hugh served three months in 1777 as an American soldier during the Revolutionary War. He enlisted as a private in Capt. Benjamin Harrison's Company, Fauquier County Militia.
   “Hugh Bramblet” signed the consent in 1814 for his daughter Milly Bramblett to marry Thomas Bell: “Sir you will please let Thomas Bell have leave to marry my daughter Mily and by so doing you will oblige your friend hugh Bramblet Wits. John Bramlett.” The Bells married Oct. 21, 1814, in Bourbon County.


Henry Bramblett and Gladah "Gladys" Gough


Henry Bramblett, child of Margaret "Peggy" Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Bourbon or Nicholas Co., Ky. His burial place is unknown. He married Gladah Gough on Dec. 30, 1785, in Fauquier County.

William Bramblett and Nancy Ann Laurence
   William Bramblett, child of Margaret "Peggy" Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Kentucky. William farmed in Fauquier County near his father before moving to Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1794. He married Nancy Ann Laurence on Dec. 26, 1793, in Fauquier County. Some of their children are named in the 1864 will of their son Peter Bramblett: James, Malinda, Ambrose and Elizabeth Bramblett.
Peter Bramblett and Mary Polly Hutsell Hall
   Peter Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born circa 1799-1800 in Bourbon Co., Ky. Peter died there in or shortly before Sept. 3, 1866, and was buried in the private family graveyard on his thousand-acre plantation near Cane Ridge. He married Mary "Polly" Hutsell Hall circa 1822 in Bourbon County. She was born April 4, 1780, in Shenandoah Valley, Va. She died Oct. 13, 1871, at home near Cane Ridge and was buried there beside Peter. Peter and Mary may have been exhumed and reinterred at Paris Cemetery in now unmarked graves when the remains of their only child, William Peter Bramblett, was moved to his final resting place beside the Confederate Memorial Monument in the Confederate Section there in 1905. One local historian indicated Peter's wife, Mary “Polly” Hutzell Hall Bramblett, was buried beside her son; however, Paris Cemetery had no record of her or her husband Peter’s burial there when queried several years ago. Mary gave birth to William Peter at about age 43. She had another son, John Hall, with her first husband, Robert D. Hall, a native of Yorkshire, England.
Peter Bramblett's Last Will and Testament:
   Peter’s will, written July 19, 1864, in Bourbon Co., Ky., includes legacies of nine slaves, about $6,000 in cash, personal and household property, and 600 acres of land to eight heirs: his wife, Polly (Mary Hutsell Hall); his stepson and executor John Hall; Peter's siblings/heirs--James, Malinda, Ambrose's descendants and Elizabeth; and his son’s 400 acres to his granddaughter “Mollie P. Bramblett”--the only child of his only child, William Peter Bramblett, who had died in 1863. He also arranged lifetime support for two invalid slaves and their freedom plus $100 for a slave named Jefferson.
I, Peter Bramblett of the County of Bourbon State of Kentucky do make this my last Will and Testament. I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] & Henry & two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate.I divise to my brother James Bramblett the tract of one hundred seventy six and a half acres of land which I purchased of Geo. W. Hall situate in Bourbon County to him his heirs and assigns forever. After the payment of my debts and one thousand Dollars to my Executor herein after named for his service in settling up my Estate, I divise all the rest and residue of my Estate consisting of about six hundred acres of land more or less whereon I now reside all my Household & kitchen furniture, slaves, stock, crops, money, notes, debts, claims, demands & chosis in action [legal/law suits] to my wife Polly Bramblett for and during her life with the privilege & power to divise five thousand dollars thereof in cash to whomsoever she may think proper and after her death all said Estate, hereby divised to her shall be sold by my executor herein after named who is vested with full power to convey the same to the purchaser or purchasers and the proceeds thereof after deducting the five thousand Dollars mentioned herein I divise to be equally divided between my brothers and sisters or their descendants to wit: To Malinda Young one equal share To Ambrose Bramblett’s descendants one equal share To Elizabeth Miles [? document smudged] one equal share. I constitute my stepson John Hall Executor of this my last will and Testament & divise to him the one thousand dollars aforesaid for his service & settling up my estate. The divise made to my Grand daughter Mollie P. and to my brother James in the 1st and 2nd Sect. or clause of my will is all that I intend they shall have or receive from my estate & Out of the Estate divised to my wife my Executor shall also retain in his hands after my death a sufficient sum of money to support comfortably my two invalid servants Horace & Clarissa during their lives. It is my will that whenever my servant Jefferson elects to accept his freedom agreeably to the laws of Kentucky he shall have it after my wife’s death & one hundred dollars in cash. Witness my hand this 19th day of July 1864. Peter Bramblett. Att[est] R. J. Davis R. J. Brown
Peter’s last will was probated in Bourbon County on Sept. 3, 1866, and recorded on pages 198-199 in Will/Estate Book 2845:
State of Kentucky Bourbon County Court September Term September 3d 1866 This last Will and Testament of Peter Bramblett decd was produced and proved in Open Court by the call of R. T. Davis & R. J. Brown subscribing witnesses thereto and the probate thereof being duly stamped is ordered to record. Witness Jas. M. Hughes Clerk of said court the date above. J. M. Hughes, Clk.
Peter owned nineteen slaves in Dist. 1, Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1850: a black female 55, a black female 48, a black female 40, a mulatto male 34, a mulatto female, 27, a black male, 26; a mulatto male, 26; a black female, 23; a mulatto female, 14; a black male, 28; a mulatto female, 10; a black male, 10; a mulatto male, 8; a black male, 6; a black female, 6; a mulatto female, 6; a black male, 4; a mulatto female, 21; and a mulatto female, 1
   Peter’s granddaughter and an heir, “Pollie M. Bramblett,” who is also known as Maude Mary “Mollie” Bramblett, lived with her mother, Margaret Ann Payne Bramblett, in Marion Co., Mo., in 1860 and until Margaret died there in 1921 in Palmyra. Margaret and Maude lived near William Peter’s aunt Malinda Bramblett Young and her family, who had moved to Marion County from Bourbon Co., Ky., before 1840. Maude lived in Palmyra until she died.
   Peter and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall Bramblett are parents of one only child: William Peter Bramblett.

   William Peter Bramblett, only child of Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall and Peter Bramblett, was born Oct. 21, 1823, in Bourbon Co., Ky. He fell in battle near Murfreesboro, Tenn., while serving as a Confederate officer and later died Jan. 23, 1863, at a private Payne residence in Nashville, Tenn.

The Romantic Epitome of the Dashing Southern Gentleman Planter and Military Officer: Confederate Captain William Peter Bramblett, 1823-1863, only child of Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall and Peter Bramblett of Bourbon Co., Ky. Gone too soon: twice wounded on the battlefield at Stone's River and died a POW at Nashville. Photo restoration by Deborah G. Dennis, original photo courtesy Geoff Walden, Orphan Brigade Kinfolk Association Historian.

Capt. Brambletts military tombstone in Paris Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis
The Union physician who treated Capt. Bramblett’s wounds documented his later death in Nashville in an article in the Confederate Veteran. His body was taken to his father’s thousand-acre plantation and buried in the family graveyard near Cane Ridge, Ky. His remains were later exhumed and reinterred in the Confederate section of Paris, Ky., Cemetery in 1905. William Peter’s mother, Mary, who was born 1780 in Shenandoah Valley, Va., and died in 1871 near Cane Ridge, and his father, Peter, who died in 1866, no doubt attended their only child’s burial. William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, and their only child, Maude Mary “Pollie M.” “Mollie” Bramblett, are not mentioned in his death notices. They were living in Missouri by 1860, perhaps to escape the dangers of the impending war. It is not known if they returned to Kentucky to attend his funeral at Cane Ridge; however, one historical report indicates only a remnant of his company attended his burial.

Bramblett to Payne: This certifies that William P. Bramblett of Bourbon County and Miss Margaret Ann Payne of Marion County were united in marriage Jany. 28, 1854, by the undersigned a regular ordained minister of the Baptist Church, Jas. S. Green Recorder Filed 1st of February 1854 Thos. E. Thompson (Marion Co., Mo., MB:158)
William Peter’s wife, Margaret, and daughter, Maude Mary, inherited his Kentucky estate and continued to live in Missouri until their deaths. After William Peter died, his father administered his estate, transferring his land and slaves to Maude Mary, whom he identified in his 1864 Bourbon Co., Ky., will as "Mollie P. Bramblett":
"I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] & Henry & two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate.
William Peter Bramblett’s Wife and Daughter
   William Peter's wife, Margaret Ann Payne, daughter of Minerva Hawkins Mahan and William Thomas Payne, was born circa 1828 near Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky., and died Aug. 4, 1921, in Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. Their daughter Maude Mary Bramblett/Bramlette, also died in or near Palmyra, Mo., after 1921. Margaret M. Bramlett, 40, keeping house, $3,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, widow, is listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with her daughter, Mary (Maude), 15, no occupation, $40,000 real estate and $500 personal estate, who had attended school within the year, and Margaret’s mother, Minerva K. (H.?) Payne, 61, widowed, without occupation (NARA Film M593:791:665A). All were born in Kentucky. Also listed with them: Millie Cauberton (illegible), 12, born in Missouri, black, domestic servant. (Note the real and personal estate amounts for Mary Maude “Mollie” “Polly” Bramblett, indicating she inherited her father's estate and part of her grandfather's estate. Mgt. Bramblette, 50, at home, widowed, and daughter, Maude, 25, at home, divorced, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo., living with Margaret’s mother, Mrs. Minerva Payne, 74, born in Kentucky to a mother born in Ireland, father born in Virginia, keeps house, head of the family (NARA Film T9:702:346B). Maude may have married a man named Wilson between 1870 and 1880 and later divorced. She is referred to as Maude Wilson at one time by one source. Margaret Bramlett, 75, born in January 1825 in Kentucky to parents born there, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, is listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with one daughter, “Maud M. (Mary P. ‘Pollie M.’ ‘Mollie’) Bramlett,” 45, born in October 1854 in Kentucky to parents born there, servant in the home (NARA Film T623:874:42B). Margret Bramblette, 81, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramblette,” 54, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, both widowed, both retired with incomes, are listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T624:798:43A). Margaret Bramlette, 91, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramlette,” 60, single, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1920 U. S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T625:934:38A).

Captain Bramblett’s Fall at Stone’s River

...Captain Bramblett with two of his lieutenants, myself one of them, crawled through the weeds a distance of several hundred yards to a prominent part of observation from which through his field glass and even the naked eye we could see the enemy’s concentrated forces near and above the lower ford on the opposite side of the river, his artillery being thrown forward and nearest to the river. His artillery appeared to be close together and covering quite a space of ground; we could not tell how many guns, but there was quite a number. The infantry was seemingly in large force and extended farther down toward the ford. Captain Bramblett was a man of no mean order of military genius and information, and after looking at, and studying the situation in silence for some minutes, he said to us boys, that he believed “Rosecrans was setting a trap for Bragg.” Continuing, he said, “If he means to attack us on this side, why does he not reinforce this side? Why concentrate so much artillery on the bluff yonder? He must be expecting us to attack that force yonder, pointing to Beatty’s position on the hill North of us, and if we do, he will use that artillery on us as we move to the attack.” At another time during the afternoon I heard him while discussing the situation with other officers of the regiment use substantially the same argument. I accompanied Captain Bramblett to General Breckinridge’s headquarters and heard him make substantially in detail a report containing the facts above recited....General Breckinridge, to thoroughly and unmistakably understand the situation and satisfy himself, in company with one or two of his staff examined the situation as best he could and I presume reached the same conclusion, and when he (Breckinridge) repaired to Bragg’s headquarters and...suggested the presumptive plan of the enemy, Bragg said: “Sir, my information is different. I have given the order to attack the enemy in your front and expect it to be obeyed.” What was General Breckinridge to do but attempt to carry out his orders, though in carrying out this unwise and ill-conceived order it should cost in one hour and ten minutes 1,700 of as brave and chivalrous soldiers as the world ever saw. What a terrible blunder, what a bloody and useless sacrifice!...We rallied some distance to the right of where we started and found that many, very many, of our noblest, truest and best had fallen. Some of them were left on the field, among whom was my military preceptor, advisor and dear friend, Captain Bramblett, who fell into the hands of the enemy and who died a few days after in Nashville. I shall never forget our parting, a moment or two before he received his wound--never forget the last quick glance and the circumstances that called it forth. He was a splendid soldier and his loss grieved me very much.... --Lieutenant Lott D. Young, “Reminiscences of a Soldier of the Orphan Brigade,” Paris, Kentucky
The Union physician who treated William Peter’s wounds after he was captured and taken to a prison hospital, Dr. F. G. Hickman, of Vandalia, Ill., also indicated in an 1894 article William Peter died at a private residence in Nashville:

Captain Bramblett’s Death in Nashville
Soon after the battle of Stone’s River...I was placed in charge of a prison hospital at Nashville. The hospital was on Cherry Street, South Nashville. The hospital was for the sick and wounded Confederates and the sick of the Union Army who were under arrest for the violation of military discipline. The position I occupied as surgeon of the hospital gave me the opportunity of making many acquaintances, especially among ladies who thronged the hospital daily to see and inquire about relatives and friends. I well remember some who took an active part in administering to the wants of their sick and wounded friends. [Among them was a Miss Payne who cared for Captain Bramblett as he died.] ...At the battle of Stone’s River, on Friday night about midnight there was a wounded Confederate officer brought to the field operating tent in which I was engaged as assistant surgeon, and he was laid just outside the tent. After many hours, Dr. Walton, of Kentucky, who was in charge, said to us: “We will not do any more work to-night.” Just then we heard an exclamation from this officer, and I insisted that he be brought in and his wounds dressed. This was done, and he asked me if his wounds were fatal. I told him that the chances were greatly against him. He was shot through the chest and through the leg. He was carried to a shed near by and laid on some unbaled cotton. I gave him some water and brandy. The night was very cold; I got an order for a pair of blankets and placed them over him and told him that I would see him in the morning, but I failed, as he was sent to Nashville very early. He was Capt. Peter Bramblett, Second [actually Fourth] Kentucky Infantry. Ten days later I saw his death announced in a Nashville paper. Mrs. Payne who was a frequent visitor at the hospital, wanted to have a friend of hers paroled and taken to her home, and related to me that she had cared for several Confederate soldiers, one of whom was Capt. Bramblett, who had died at her house. She said that when he was about to die she concluded to remove the coarse blankets and replace them with neater ones; that he caught her hand and said: “No, do not remove those blankets, for they saved my life at Stone’s River. They were placed over me that cold night by the hand of the enemy, but a brother. You may come across him sometime; and if you should, tell him I died under the blankets he placed over me that night.” She sent them to his parents in Paris, Ky. --“Reminiscences of a Federal Surgeon,” Confederate Veteran, 1894.
“...The only son of an indulgent father, who owned one thousand acres of Blue Grass land, with money, stock and slaves, he gave up all for what he conceived to be the right....” --Capt. Hugh Henry
Capt. Hugh Henry, Kentucky Orphan Brigade, Capt. William Peter Bramblett’s friend and neighbor in life and successor in battle, later of Louisville, Ky., memorialized him in the Bourbon News:
Capt. William Peter Bramblette Bourbon County through her press, has boasted of and blazoned the deeds of her brave soldiers performed upon the field of Mars upon either side during the late war. But while she has been almost universally generous in her recollections and praise, there remains one, strange to record, whose memory seems entirely shrouded in oblivion; one too who had as much to jeopardize from a worldly standpoint as any, and I dare assert that none bore themselves more gallantly or died more bravely than the subject of this sketch. Born in Bourbon county, elected first Lieutenant in Capt. W. E. Simms' Company in the Mexican War and distinguished there for his military bearing and efficiency, it was an easy matter for him to enlist a Company to follow him when the tocsin of war sounded, and he announced his intention of casting his lot with the Confederate army. The only son of an indulgent father, who owned one thousand acres of Blue Grass land, with money, stock and slaves, he gave up all for what he conceived to be the right, and in the stormy period, at Shiloh, Vicksburg and Murfreesboro, (at which latter place he was mortally wounded and died at Nashville). No man was more conspicuously brave, more devoted to the cause, or more solicitous for the comfort and welfare of his men than he. He fell on the bloody field of Murfreesboro in the fearful and ever memorable charge of the gallant Breckinridge, and the few remaining members of his Company vividly remember his bearing on that occasion, as with sword in hand he led them through the hail of shot and shell which rained upon them from the Federal batteries. He was brought back and buried at the old homestead and although the weather was intensely cold and bayonets overshadowed the land, there was an immense throng present. Laid away in his oblivious surroundings, with none to kindly remember or appreciate him save the remnant of a once proud and gallant Company, yet should Bourbon county, at any time in the future conclude to note other names upon the monument she has erected to the memory of her fallen braves, she cannot in justice to herself and history write a name higher upon her school of fame and honor than that of Capt. Wm. P. Bramblette. [Signed] H. [Hugh Henry] 
Hugh Henry’s description of the battle as “the fearful and ever memorable charge of the gallant Breckinridge” is a veiled reference to the general’s attempt to persuade General Braxton Bragg to delay the fight or change tactics based on military intelligence he and Capt. Bramblett provided after assessing the field. Hugh Henry believed Bragg's decision to refute the intelligence and continue with his fateful, unsuccessful engagement plan resulted in some 1,700 unnecessary Confederate deaths during the battle. Hugh Henry, who helped carry Capt. Bramblett from the battlefield that day after he was twice wounded, is identified in the article below as one of the pallbearers at Capt. Bramblett's 1905 reinterment in Paris, Ky., as is Lieutenant Lot D. Young, who describes Capt. Bramblett's fall at the Battle of Stone’s River in another news article above.
   The undated memorial by Capt. Hugh Henry above and other news items below are courtesy of Geoff Walden, Orphan Brigade Historian, the latter appearing in print in August 1905 when William Peter and reportedly perhaps his parents were exhumed from the family graveyard near Cane Ridge and reinterred in the Confederate Section of Paris, Ky., Cemetery.

(William) Peter Bramblett memorialized on the honor wall of Confederate Monument, Paris, Ky., Cemetery (fifth from top, left column)

"Capt. William P. Bramblett Paris, Ky., Aug. 8, 1905. Tuesday. Remains Reinterred. The remains of Capt. Wm. P. Bramlette, of the Kentucky Orphan Brigade who fell in the battle of Murfreesboro, will be taken from the old farm lot on Cane Ridge and reinterred in the Confederate lot on the 24th inst., at 3:00 P. M. Veterans and friends of the lost cause are invited to be present." -- The Bourbon News
BRAMBLETT, Captain William P., Confederate killed at Murfreesboro and buried near Cane Ridge, will be exhumed and re-interred August 24, at the Confederate lot in the Paris Cemetery. Col. A. T. Forsythe, being master of ceremonies, orderly Sergeant William E. Knox, called the roll of the living and the dead, when Capt. James R. Rogers feelingly pronounced the eulogy. He reviewed the military record of Capt. Bramblett and paid an eloquent tribute to his memory. Rev. Dr. E. H. Rutherford pronounced the benediction. Capt. Bramblett was born and reared in Bourbon County, Ky., near the historic grounds of old Cane Ridge Church. He was a young man of great prominence, endowed with fine personal appearance, possessed of a large farm and many slaves. He enlisted in the Mexican War and served as Lieut. in Capt. Simms' Co. from 1847 to 1848. In 1861 he enlisted in Col. Roger Hanson’s Regt, Gen. John C. Breckinridge’s brigade. At the battle of Murfreesboro, where 45,000 Confederates were engaged and during the terrific charge made by Breckenridge in which 2,000 were killed and wounded, Peter Bramblett was one of the number wounded, and while being borne tenderly from the field by Capt. Henry and other comrades, he was again wounded, this time yielding up his precious life as one of the bravest and knightliest of soldiers and truest and tenderest of gentlemen. Pall Bearers: Capt. Hugh Henry of Louisville, William E. Knox of Wilmore; Lieut. L. D. Young of Carlisle; Dr. C. J. Clark of Paris; James McDonald, of Kansas City; Capt. James R. Rogers of Cane Ridge. About 800 old soldiers and friends were present. -- August 2, 1905, The Bourbon News 
William Peter Bramblett was also celebrated by his only child. Maude Mary “Polly M.” “Molly” Bramlette identifies herself as his daughter in her membership application for the Missouri Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which she joined to honor her father’s war service.

   James Bramblett, child of William and Nancy Laurence Bramblett, lived in Bourbon Co., Ky. He died sometime after 1864.
   Malinda Bramblett, child of William and Nancy Laurence Bramblett, lived in Bourbon Co., Ky. She died sometime after 1864 in Marion Co., Mo. She is identified as "Malinda Young" in her brother Peter's 1864 will. Malinda and family moved to Missouri before 1840.
   Ambrose Bramblett, child of William and Nancy Laurence Bramblett, lived in Bourbon Co., Ky. Family tradition holds that he died after being shot during a duel before 1864. His brother Peter Bramblett designated Ambrose as deceased and mentioned his children as some of his heirs in his 1864 will.
   Elizabeth Bramblett, child of William and Nancy Laurence Bramblett, lived in Bourbon Co., Ky. He died sometime after 1864. She is identified as "Elizabeth Miles" or "Elizabeth Mitchell" in her brother Peter's 1864 will. (Will is smudged and part of Elizabeth's surname is missing.)

Reuben Bramblett Jr. and Susannah Unknown
Reuben Bramblett Jr. served as a teamster during the American Revolution
Reuben Bramblett Jr., child of Margaret "Peggy" Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in 1758 in Fauquier Co., Va. Reuben died after 1840 in Laurens Co., S. C. His burial place is unknown. He served as a paid teamster for Fauquier County Commissioners during the Revolutionary War. He is documented and should be celebrated as a Patriot of the Revolution in five Fauquier County “Publick Claims” that he filed beginning on Sept. 22, 1783, after the war for waggoning supplies to Fredericksburg for the American Rebels during the war. He applied for compensation for delivering three loads of flour and other provisions to the military “At a court held for Fauquier County”...“pursuant to the act of Assembly entitled ‘an act for adjusting claims for property impressed or taken for public services.’” These payments from the county apparently disqualified him as a pensioner. Enlisted soldiers were paid by the war department for their service, while teamsters hired by county commissioners were paid by the individual counties. Reuben Jr. states in his pension application, R.1152, filed in 1832 in Laurens County, that he was enlisted as a private in Capt. Elias Edmonds’ Company, First Regiment of Artillery, under Col. Thomas Marshall. His son Louis reapplied for the pension in 1853, but the claim was rejected again for the same reason: Reuben was considered to be a paid teamster during the war. His son Louis is the namesake of his Uncle Lewis Bramblett Sr. who died in Indiana.



   Louis Bramblett, child of Susannah Unknown and Reuben Bramblett Jr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He married Catherine "Katy" Brown.
Five of Louis and Catherine Brown Bramblett's sons served in the Confederacy during the War Between the States


Louis and Catherine's Bible Record, preserved by Dorothy Bramlett Tallent, courtesy descendant Kenneth R. Bramlett

Noted by Kenneth Robert Bramlett on July 1, 1994: Eleven of twelve children are listed in the Bible record: William Rutherford, born 1814, is omitted. Also listed, wife of William Rutherford Bramlett--Sarah E. Bramlett died June 2, 1912--and wife of Allen Colyar Bramlett--Sue N. Bramlett died April 3, 1915.
   Louis and Catherine's children include James Edwin, Reuben, Polly, William Rutherford, Elizabeth, Henry, Nancy, Susan B., John L., Charles, Austin, Thomas N. Bramlett.

John L. Bramblett's tombstone in Confederate Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis
   John L. Bramblett, child of Louis and Catherine Brown Bramblett, was born Aug. 23, 1828, inn Laurens Co., S. C. He died at Rock Island, Illinois, Prison while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He is buried there in Grave 1079, Confederate Cemetery, Arsenal Island. "John Bramlet," 31, is listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Scuffletown P.O., Laurens Court House, Laurens Co., S. C., with parents, Lewis, 61, and Fanny (Catherine “Katy” “Fanny” Brown), 61, and sister Susan, 21, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1222:293A). John L. Bramblet enlisted Jan. 2, 1862, as a private in Company E, Third (Laurens/Lt. Col. George S. James) Battalion, South Carolina Infantry, at Camp Hampton, Columbia, S. C. He was ill and hospitalized Feb. 1-28, 1862, and on sick furlough March-April 1862. He was reported missing by his company Dec. 13, 1863, at the Battle of Bean Station, Tenn. He was captured Dec. 18, 1863, at Knoxville, Tenn., and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, and then to Louisville, Ky. He was transferred Jan. 23, 1864, and held as a prisoner of war at Rock Island Barracks, Illinois, until he died of disease there April 22, 1864.

 Mary "Polly" Bramblett, child of Margaret "Peggy" Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. 

   Mildred "Milly" Bramblett, child of Margaret "Peggy" Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va.
   Lewis Bramblett Sr., child of Margaret "Peggy" Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1774 in Fauquier Co., Va. He probably died in Indiana where he lived before 1850. Two children are Lewis Jr. and Abraham Bramblett. Others may be Reuben and Mitchell Bramblett.
   Lewis Bramblett Jr., child of Lydia? Unknown and Lewis Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1812 in Kentucky. He died circa 1873 in Greene Co., Ark. One of his children is John B. Bramlett. One descendant is Phyllis Harwell.
   John B. Bramlett, child of Lewis Bramblett Jr., was born April 30, 1840. He died Dec. 19, 1887. He married Matilda J. Hampton. Their children include Mary Jane, John H., Louis Isaiah, Sarah A., Susan C., James M., Charles D., Jalley, Couzon/Corazon, Tillman, Richard, Dump M. Bramlett.

Abraham Bramblett, son of Lewis Bramblett Sr.
   Abraham Bramblett, child of Lydia Unknown Lewis Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1813-1816 in Kentucky. He died Jan. 26, 1891, in Raccoon Twp., Parke Co., Ind., and was buried in Crab Cemetery, Bridgeton, Parke Co., Ind. (Indiana Deaths Book H-14:7). He moved to Indiana in or before 1838. He married a cousin, Nancy Gamble, on March 13, 1838, in Hendricks Co., Ind. She was born circa 1814 in Kentucky. She died before May 30, 1859, when Abraham married again to Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison. Abraham wrote his will on Dec. 16, 1861. It was proved Feb. 2, 1891, in Parke Co., Ind.
Abraham Bramblett's Last Will and Testament
I, Abraham Bramblet do make publish this my last will and testament.
1st I give and devise to my beloved wife in lieu of her interest in my lands the farm on which we now reside situate in Raccoon Township Parke County State of Indiana containing one hundred and twenty two acres during her natural life and all the stock household goods furnature Provisions and other goods and chattles which may be thereon at the time of my decease during her natural life as aforesaid; she however selling so much thereof as may be sufficient to pay my Just debts at the death of my said wife the Real Estate aforesaid I give and devise to my children to be equally divided among my said children of my said wife should not survive me then I devise and bequeath the personal property to my children. But in case my wife should again marry her interest in said Estate shall Cease and will be null and void.
In testimony hereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 16th day of December anno 1861. Abraham his x mark Bramlett {seal}
Signed and acknowledged by said Abraham Bramblet as his last will and testament in our presence and signed by us in his presence John Briggs Jr. {seal} Joseph W. Cole {seal}
Proof of Will
State of Indiana} Parke County} On this 2d day of February 1891 Joseph W. Cole personally appeared before the Clerk of the Parke Circuit Court, and being duly sworn says that Abraham Bramlet signed his name by mark to the above writing of date of 16th day of december 1861, as and for his last will, and that the same was attested by said affiant and John Briggs Jr. as witnesses thereto, in the presence of said Testator and by his request, and that said Testator declared the same to be his last will, and that said Testator was not, at the time of executing said will an infant, or of unsound mind, or under coersion. J. W. Cole
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day February 1891.
{Seal} Attest the hand and seal of office of said Clerk, the date last aforesaid. J. H. McCoy Clerk
To Certificate of Probate
State of Indiana Parke County: I, J. H. McCoy Clerk of the Parke Circuit Court, certify that the within last will of Abraham Bramblet late of said County, deceased, has been duly admitted to probate, that its due execution was this day proved by J. W. Cole, whose proofs, together with such will, have been duly been recorded on pages 505 and 506 of Record No. 3 of Wills in our Office.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and affixed the seal of said Court, this 2d day of February 1891. J. H. McCoy Clerk (Courtesy Linda Hayes)
Abraham in Census Data
   "Abram Bramlet," 34, born in Kentucky, farmer, $500 real estate, and (first) wife, Nancy (Gamble), 36, born Kentucky, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Dist. 85, Parke Co., Ind., with six children born in Indiana (William J., 10; Henry H., 8; Benjamin H., 7; Mary L., 6; Reuben, 4; Milla, 1) and three others (Jonathan Petty, 38, born North Carolina; Nancy Petty, 10, Indiana; Angaline Petty, 4, Indiana) (NARA Film M432:164:265A). Abraham second married Eliza Jane “Louisa” Harrison on May 30, 1859, in Parke Co., Ind. She was born circa 1840 in Indiana. She died sometime after 1886. “Abram Bramlet,” 44, born Kentucky, and (second) wife, Eliza J., 20, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Bridgeton P. O., Raccoon Twp., Parke Co., Ind., with eight grown and minor children born Indiana: James, 21; Henry H., 19; Benjamin H., 17; Mary L., 13; Reuben, 12; Andrew, 9; Abel, 8; Douglass, 1/12 (NARA Film M653:287:433). “A. Bramblet,” 51, born Kentucky, farmer, $10,000 real estate, $785 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Bridgeton P. O., Raccoon Twp., Parke Co., Ind., with (second) wife, Eliza J. (Jane “Louisa” Harrison), 27, born Indiana, keeping house, and 13 children born Indiana: James, 27, idiotic; Henry, 25, idiotic; Benjamin, 23, idiotic; Andrew, 20; Reuben, 18, idiotic; Abel, 14; Rewham (Rhuhama), 12; Frederick, 11; Ambrose, 7; Susan J., 5; George, 4; Ridley, 3; Minnie, 11/12 (NARA Film M593:349:159A). “Abraham Bramblett,” 64, born Kentucky to a mother born Ohio, father Virginia, farmer, and wife, Louisa J., 39, born Indiana to a mother born Ohio, father Virginia, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Raccoon Twp., Parke Co., Ind., with eleven grown and minor children born Indiana: James, 33; Benjamin, 31; Reuben, 29; Ambrose, 16; Susan J., 12; Minnie M., 11; George, 10; Ridley, 8; Ella, 7; Harvey, 4; Maggie, 10/12 (NARA Film T9:303:585A). Abraham's son Ambrose M. heads the family in the 1900 U. S. Census for Raccoon Twp., Parke Co., Ind.: “A. M. Bramlet,” 37, born Indiana, mother born there, father Kentucky, and six siblings born Indiana: George, 33; Harvey, 25; Ella, 27; Ida, 19; Girthie, 16; Gracie, 14 (NARA Film T623:396:14A).
   Abraham's known children, mainly from census data, are William James, Henry H., Benjamin H., Mary L., Reuben ("Rube"), Milla ("Milly"), Andrew, Abel, Rhuhama, Douglass, Frederick, Ambrose M., Susan J., Ridley, George, Minnie M., Ella, Harvey, Margaret, Ida, Gertie, Grace Bramblett.
Highland Lawn Cemetery in Terre Haute, Ind., where William James and Reuben Bramblett are buried
   William James Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1839 in Parke Co., Ind. James, white male, age 65 years, died of "infirmity" on March 13, 1899, and was buried the same day at Highland Lawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Vigo Co., Ind. (Death Record Book CH-46, p. 66; H-37, p. 44). James, listed as "idiotic" in 1870, must have had a mental disability. He lived with his father and stepmother in 1880.
   Henry H. Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1841 in Parke Co., Ind. Henry, listed as "idiotic" in 1870, must have had a mental disability. He may have died or lived elsewhere in 1880: Henry is not listed with his father in the census that year.
   Benjamin H. Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1843 in Parke Co., Ind. Benjamin, listed as "idiotic" in 1870, must have had a mental disability. He lived with his father and stepmother in 1880.
   Mary L. Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1844-46 in Parke Co., Ind. Benjamin, listed as "idiotic" in 1870, must have had a mental disability. She may have died or lived elsewhere in 1880: Mary is not listed with her father in the census that year.
   Reuben "Rube" Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1848-49 in Parke Co., Ind. "Rube," white male, age 50, died of "general debility" on March 20, 1899, in Terre Haute, Vigo Co., Ind., and was buried there the next day at Highland Lawn Cemetery (Death Record Book CH-46, p. 66; H-37, p. 44). Reuben, listed as "idiotic" in 1870, must have had a mental disability. He lived with his father and stepmother in 1880.
   Milla "Milly" Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1849 in Parke Co., Ind. She may have died or lived elsewhere in 1880: Milly is not listed with her father in the census that year.
   Andrew Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1850 in Parke Co., Ind. He may have died or lived elsewhere in 1880: Andrew is not listed with his father in the census that year.
   Abel Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1851 in Parke Co., Ind. He may have died or lived elsewhere in 1880: Abel is not listed with his father in the census that year.
   Rhuhama Bramblett, child of Nancy Gamble or Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1857-58 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. She died after 1889 in Indiana. She married George Washington Payne on Dec. 21, 1876, in Indiana. He was born circa 1852 in Indiana, the son of Eliza Archer and Alexander Payne. George died in 1939 and was buried at Clear Run Cemetery, Bridgeton, Parke Co., Ind. One researcher connected to a direct descendant of Rhuhama is Linda Hayes.
   Douglass Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1859 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind.
   Frederick Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1860 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind.
   Ambrose M. Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1863-64 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. He died in 1928 and was buried at Clear Run Cemetery. He lived with his father and stepmother in 1880. Ambrose headed the family of six other siblings in the 1900 U. S. Census for Raccoon Twp., Parke Co., Ind.: “A. M. Bramlet,” 37, born Indiana, mother born there, father Kentucky, and six siblings born Indiana: George, 33; Harvey, 25; Ella, 27; Ida, 19; Girthie, 16; Gracie, 14 (NARA Film T623:396:14A).
   Susan J. Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born Sept. 20, 1864, in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. She died Jan. 27, 1893, and was buried at Clear Run Cemetery. She married L. L. Ayers after 1880.
   Ridley Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1866-72 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. He lived with his parents in 1880.
   George Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1867 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. He lived with his parents in 1880 and with his brother Ambrose M. Bramblett in 1900. He died in 1945 and was buried in Clear Run Cemetery.
   Minnie M. Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1869 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. She lived with her parents in 1880. She died in 1929 and was buried at Clear Run Cemetery. She married William B. Garrigus, born 1871 and died 1955.
   Ella Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1873 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. She lived with her parents in 1880 and with her brother Ambrose M. Bramblett in 1900.
   Harvey Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1875 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. He lived with his parents in 1880 and with his brother Ambrose M. Bramblett in 1900.
   Margaret "Maggie" Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1879 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. She lived with her parents in 1880.
   Ida Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1881 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. She lived with her brother Ambrose M. Bramblett and other siblings in 1900.
   Gertie Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1886 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. She lived with her brother Ambrose M. Bramblett and other siblings in 1900.
   Grace Bramblett, child of Eliza Jane "Louisa" Harrison and Abraham Bramblett, was born circa 1888 in Raccoon, Parke Co., Ind. She lived with her brother Ambrose M. Bramblett and other siblings in 1900.
--

Chapter 4:
Generation 3
REV. WILLIAM BRAMBLETT JR. and ANNA BALLARD
(Children: James, William III, Mary, Reuben, Mildred, Lydia, Lucy, Matilda, Elkanah)
Rev. William Bramblett Jr. served as a Soldier during the French & Indian War in Virginia
and during the American Revolution in Kentucky with Col. Daniel Boone
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Rev. William Bramblett Jr., child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1719 in Colonial Virginia. William Jr. was a member of the Virginia Militia ordered into service in 1758 during the French and Indian War. Hening's Statutes indicates he was paid 5 pounds, 19 shillings in September 1758 for his service (Hening 209). He was a planter who established Cedar Hill Plantation in 1760 in Bedford Co., Va., a surveyor and a registered Baptist Minister in Bedford County. His name appears Sept. 22, 1777, on a list of ministers of the gospel authorized by the court to perform marriages and preach. He was reportedly the first white minister to preach in Kentucky. He died before Aug. 23, 1779, in present day Knox Co., Ky., and was buried there near Flat Lick, Ky., in an unknown grave location marked with one or more large boulders. He was accidentally shot and killed or purposely killed by traveling companion Aquilla White during a real or perceived Indian attack while a hunting excursion from camp. The group had stopped to eat and rest near Cumberland Gap on the journey back to Virginia. Rev. William Jr. went on the trip with Daniel Boone and Company to defend and deliver supplies to forts and claim land. He had just established Bramblett's Station in Fayette (now Bourbon) Co., Ky. The Land Court in Kentucky issued a certificate referring to Bramblett's Station "on a branch of Stoner's Fork, a branch of Licking." The first term of the Land Court was held Oct. 13, 1779, shortly after Rev. William Jr.'s death. His Nenney descendants who lived near the Gap in Tennessee were convinced he was killed on purpose for his Kentucky land. An eyewitness described the incident as an accident.
  William Jr. wrote his will Feb. 26, 1779, in Bedford Co., Va. (WB-1:351). It names his wife, Anna, and son James and mentions "my other children" as heirs. It was probated Aug. 23, 1779. An inventory/appraisement dated Oct. 25, 1779, includes "one negro fellow." Friends and relatives William Callaway and William Buford were named and served as executors. Anna inherited the estate to use until she married again or died, and James inherited a young horse named Ranter. William’s estate was inventoried by Augustine Leftwich, D. Beard and George Dooley in Bedford County in October 1779:
Bramblett’s Inventory} In Obedience to an Order of Bedford Court to us directed have appraised the Estate of Wm. Bramblett Decd as follows Viz One Negro Fellow £1, 200.00, 1 Young Bay Horse £250, 1 Brown Mare £200, 1 Black do. £160, 1 Gray Horse £200, 1 Bay Mare Colt £100, 1 do. £80, 1 Bay Horse £150, 1 Large Do. £250, 17 Head of Sheep £130, 13 Head of Cattle £350, 3 head of do. £130, 1 Bell & Collar £3, 4 Bedsteads Beds & furniture £400, 1 Rifle Gun £80, 1 old Smothe do £10, 3 Chests £30, 2 Tables £6, 1 Great Wheel & 3 Small Do .£32.10, 1 Box of Shew Tools £5, Sundries of Carpenter’s Tools £30, Sundries of Tools £12, 5 Sickles £4, 1 Barr Shear & Lumber £25, 3 Pare old Cards £10, 2 Old Sithes & hangings £8, 1 Crosscutsaw £30, a Man’s Saddle £30, a Woman’s Do. £15, 1 pare Steelyards £12, 4 Sides of Lether £40, 13 deer Skins £70, 1 Elk Skin & 2 Pieces Taned Lether 15£, 1 Old Hackle 25, 5 axes & a Tomahawk £30, 3 Hoes Lg. 2 Small plows & hangings £15, 1 Pare Iron Wedges £5, 1 Matlock £7, Old pewter £25, 2 Cream pots £5, 2 pots & a duch Oven £20, a parcel Lumber £20, 1 Loom £15, Sundries of Geers £10, Sundries of Slays £12, 16 Head of Hogs £160, 6 head do. 7.10, 1 Truck Wagon £10, a Cutting Box £10, 4 Bells & Collars £13, a quantity of Books £21, 1 hive Bees £8; 1 Box Iron & heaters £3, 1 Candlestick 18, a Small Trunk 40, 2 Razors & Brass £5, 1 Tin Coffeepot 20.
A memo at the bottom of the document indicates “We the appraisors do hereby certify that we appraised the Estate of William Bramblett at Twenty prices more than it would have been sold for Ye Year 1774. Augustine Leftwich, D. Beard and George Dooley.” They returned the inventory and appraisement to the court to be recorded by J. Steptoe, Clerk, on Oct. 25, 1779 (WB-1:357).
William Jr. and Anna's Marriage
   William Jr. married Anna Ballard circa 1761 in Bedford County. No official record of the union has been found, but her given name is provided in his 1779 will and his name is connected with her father's estate, providing enough evidence for an implied marriage. Anna was born before 1745 in Colonial Virginia, the daughter of Elizabeth Orrick and Richard Ballard Sr. Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America reported in 1940 that “William Bramlette married, in 1761 or 1762, in Virginia, Ann, whose surname is not known” (209). Ann probably was born before 1745 in Virginia. Her father, Richard Ballard Sr., conveyed his entire estate to his children in the form of deeds: Anna Bramblett, wife of William; Elizabeth Orrick, deceased; Daughter Preston, Daughter Stone, Thomas Ballard, Micajah Ballard and Richard Ballard Jr. Several of his 1765-1770 Bedford County deeds indicate Anna's siblings are a sister Elizabeth who married a man named Orrick and died by 1770; a sister who married Thomas Preston and lived in Bedford County; a sister who married Eusabeous Stone and lived in adjacent Pittsylvania Co., Va.; Thomas Ballard, who lived in Roan Co., N. C.; Micajah Ballard, of Bedford County; and Richard Ballard Jr., who lived in Bedford Co., Va. William Bramblett and Thomas Preston were appointed managers of the large estate and arrange its sale on Nov. 22, 1770, (DB-C-3:507-508). Anna may have died after 1796 in Virginia. (It also is possible that she was still living in Virginia in 1798 and married Thomas Lumpkin there. However, that Ann Bramblett may be a different person, a niece of Anna.) She definitely died or remarried before 1803-1805. Anna died sometime after giving consent to her daughter Lucy's marriage to Patrick Nenney in 1796. She may have died circa 1803-1805 in Bedford County when her children inherited Cedar Hill Plantation and began selling the manor house and property to James Callaway Steptoe. Her burial place most likely is the Bramblett Graveyard, now lost, at Cedar Hill Plantation.
   Anna Ballard Bramblett was a Patriot in the American Revolution. She made public claims on Nov. 13, 1780, and March 25, 1782, in Bedford County for provisions she gave to the military during the war. She was reimbursed 12 pounds, five shillings, four pence, on March 25 for "provisions for men & horses."
   Anna and William Jr.'s Kentucky land are mentioned in court records regarding a land dispute involving her brother-in-law James Buford and her sons James and Reuben who were being sued by Charles Shores in Fayette Co., Ky., in 1783 and 1789. James owned 716 acres of land there and agreed to sell some or all of it to James Buford, husband of Elizabeth Bramblett; but his brother Reuben, who was in Kentucky at the time, also agreed to sell part of it--100 acres--to Charles Shores. The long court case was settled in Shores's favor in 1803. Anna gave consent for her daughter Milley to marry John Hancock in 1789 in Bedford County. Anna's son James Sr. signed the marriage bond as surety/witness. Anna gave consent for her daughter Lydda to marry John Quinn in 1790. As mentioned above, Anna also gave consent for her daughter Lucy to marry Patrick Nenney in 1796.
Rev. William Jr. and Anna's Life in Virginia
   William Jr. first appears in an official record with his father, William I/Sr., on a 1752 tithe list in a portion of Lunenburg Co., Va., that later became Bedford County in 1754. The list was created by John Phelps, who later is mentioned in Bedford records. (William Jr.'s brother Ambrose is listed with Richard Callaway on the same tithe list.) William Jr. witnessed a deed in Bedford Co., Va., on Oct. 25, 1760, which was later recorded for William and Elizabeth Boid/Boyd in Halifax Co., Va., on March 19, 1761. The Boyds, of Bedford County, sold 95 acres on both sides of Widow Ridges Creek "beg. at a pine thence new lines south...all houses, woods, etc." to William Jr.'s brother-in-law James Callaway, husband of Sarah "Sallie" Bramblett. Other witnesses: John Tinklear and John Callaway. William Jr. bought 312 acres of land on Little Otter River adjoining John Callaway in Bedford County from George Walton. The deed was recorded Sept. 28, 1762 (DB-B2:79). The land may have been used to establish or add to Cedar Hill Plantation.
Cedar Hill Plantation where Rev. William Bramblett Jr.'s family lived in Bedford, Va., in 1761-1805



The oldest part of Cedar Hill Plantation’s manor house, top left, was constructed by Rev. William Bramblett Jr. circa 1760 in Bedford, Va. His heirs sold the house and 700 acres in 1803-1805 to James Callaway Steptoe, the county clerk. Steptoe constructed a separate brick office on the property to contain his court records and enlarged the original house with additions. A Virginia W. P. A. Historical Inventory documents a separate brick kitchen west of the house, connected to the manor with a flagstone walk. Unfortunately, the Bramblett family graveyard, located west of the kitchen, and the ice house, meat house and slave cabins were not preserved when land surrounding the house was sold for redevelopment. The residence in the early 1980s was considered by the State of Virginia and National Registers of Historic Places for designation as an historic landmark worthy of preservation; however, no designation occurred. Its significance involves its age, architectural qualities and past associations to prominent Bedford families, including Brambletts and Steptoes as well as other owners named Gray, Richie, Jordan, Crenshaw and Cauthorn. The 18th century Bramblett section is an example of early Piedmont Vernacular architecture featuring an unusual two-room floor plan and center chimney. It is a raised cottage with brick foundation and beaded weatherboards. A rare style in Bedford County, its general classic form was more commonly found around the Williamsburg, Va., area. The larger front section of the house, added by Steptoe, is especially significant for its sophisticated late Federal domestic architectural style and rare interior features. In particular, one room has plaster cornices and a central wreath, and exceptionally rare if not unique, distinctive, museum quality wallpaper survives in the hall. Other rooms in the 19th century addition also feature exceptional wallpaper designs that have survived and are rarely found anywhere today in America. The wall designs in and of themselves are artifacts that document the period and local interior decoration. But the oldest house in Bedford no longer stands among majestic cedars on Bramblett Road with a view of Twin Peaks of Otter Mountains: economic progress dictated and allowed its removal; so, instead of being razed, it was sold, dismantled and moved into storage at Forest, Va., years ago. The plan of the new owner, Jack Tibbs: reassemble the residence at a different location. Preferably he chose a lot on a hill with a view, surrounded by ancient oaks and a grove of fragrant tall shady cedars.

William Jr. signed a deed as a witness when John Fuqua sold land on the west side of Otter River to Moses Pullen. The deed was recorded in Bedford County on Feb. 25, 1764 (DB-B2:300). William Jr. was appointed to survey a road from Bramblett's (Road or Cedar Hill Plantation) to Augusta Road on April 26, 1768. "Bramblett's Road," is now known as Main Street in Bedford, Va.William Jr. witnessed the will of John Stovall on April 6, 1778, in Bedford County (WB-1:29).

Bramblett's Station, established in the summer of 1779 on a branch of Licking River in Fayette Co., Ky., by Rev. William Bramblett Jr., is located generally in the upper right corner, south of the Ohio River and north of Boonesboro on the above map. The station was near present-day Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky. The general location of Rev. William Jr.'s death is at the lower right corner close to the trail (broken lines) near the Cumberland River and Cumberland Gap.
   Anna and William Jr.'s nine children, named in his probate records and 1803-1805 recorded deeds, are James Sr., William III, Mary ("Molly"), Reuben, Mildred ("Milley"), Lydda, Lucy, Matilda and Elkanah Bramblett.

James Bramlette Sr. and Milley Shrewsberry
(Children: Ambrose Shrewsbury, William, James Jr., Jubel, Simeon, Nathaniel, Lydia, Daughter, Daughter)
Cpl. James Bramlette Sr. served as an Soldier and Officer during the American Revolution
   James Bramlette Sr., first child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born Jan. 4, 1762, in Bedford Co., Va. He died in 1849, probably at his son Ambrose's home near Albany, Cumberland (now Clinton) Co., Ky., and may have been buried there in Elliott Graveyard. James Sr. served as a soldier, first as a private and then as a corporal, during the American Revolution. He applied for and received a pension based on his military service while living in Kentucky. James Sr. married Milley Shrewsberry on Dec. 10, 1787/89, in Bedford Co., Va. Charles Caffery signed the marriage bond as surety/witness on Dec. 9. She was born in or before 1770, the daughter of Rev. Nathaniel Shrewsberry, who signed his consent for the marriage. Milley and James lived in Wayne and then Breckinridge Co., Ky. James Sr. received a land patent of 716 acres on Hickman Creek in Jessamine Co., Ky. His cousin James Buford Jr. sold some of it for him to William Shreves in 1800.
This indenture made this 18th day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred between James Buford Jun. Attorney in fact for James Bramblet of the County of Bedford and State of Virginia of the one part and William Shreves of the County of Jessamine and State of Kentucky of the other part witnessed that the said James Buford Junior as attorney aforesaid for and in consideration of the sum of two hundred pounds to him in hand paid the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged have hereby granted bargained & sold and by these presents doth grant bargain and sell unto the said William Shreves a certain tract or parcel of land lying and being in the County of Jessamine containing three hundred and seventy acres being part of a tract of 716 acres laying on the waters of Hickman creek patented in the name of said Bramblet....In witness whereof him the said James Buford Jun. as attorney aforesaid hath hereunto set their hands and affixed their seals the day and year above written. Signed sealed & delivered James Buford {seal} in presence of us Interlined before signed in the for James Bramblet {seal} Third line in fact Jessamine To wit August County Court 1800. The foregoing indenture between James Buford Jun. as attorney in fact for James Bramblet of the one part and William Shreves of the other part was produced in court acknowledged by the said James Buford Jun. attorney as aforesaid to be his act and deed and ordered to be recorded. Atteste. (DB-A:126-127)
   James and Milley's children include Col. Ambrose Shrewsbury, William Sr., James Jr., Jubel, Simeon, Nathaniel, Lydia, Daughter and Daughter Bramlette.
   William Bramlette Sr., child of James and Milley Shrewsberry Bramlette, was born circa 1798 in Bedford Co., Va. He lived in Breckinridge Co., Ky., in 1850. He married Caroline N. Obannon on Feb. 10, 1829, in Breckinridge County. She was born circa 1812 in Kentucky and died after 1850. "William Bramlett Sr.," 52, born Virginia, farmer, and wife, Caroline, 38, born Kentucky, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Beckinridge Co., Ky., with two others: William Obannon, 4, born Kentucky, and (Caroline's father) William Obannon, 75, born Virginia (NARA Film :76).
   Col. Ambrose Shrewsbury Bramlette, child of James and Milley Shrewsberry Bramlette, was a large land and slave owner. He married Sarah "Sallie" Elliott, who came from a prominent Kentucky family. Her father owned 1,000 or more acres of land in Kentucky. Sarah and Ambrose lived at Elliott's Crossroads, Cumberland Co., Ky. They lived near Albany, Ky., when his father, James, came to live with him near the end of his days. James may be buried in Elliott Graveyard. Ambrose served two terms in the Kentucky State Senate and several terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives. Col. Ambrose and Sarah's children include Thomas ElliottJames Thompson, William Bramlette.
   Thomas Elliott Bramlette, child of Sarah “Sallie” Elliott and Col. Ambrose Shrewsbury Bramlette, was born Jan. 3, 1817, at Spring Creek, Elliott’s Crossroads near Albany in Cumberland (now Clinton) Co., Ky. He died after a brief illness, a heart ailment, on Jan. 12, 1875, at home in Louisville, Jefferson Co., Ky., and was buried in historic Cave Hill Cemetery. He married Sarah Leann "Sallie" Travis. Thomas served as a Union soldier and officer during the Civil War/War Between the States, and as Union War Democrat Governor of Kentucky in 1863-1867.

President Abraham Lincoln circa 1865 and Governor Thomas E. Bramlette circa 1863, Kentucky Military Museum

A commemorative sign near the Bramlette plot in Cave Hill Cemetery describes him as “Lawyer, legislator, soldier, and governor,” noting his birth in present day Clinton County and the activities in which he was involved with President Lincoln before and during the war.

“...I am naturally anti-slavery. If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. I can not remember when I did not so think, and feel.” — Abraham Lincoln to Albert G. Hodges, April 4, 1864
   President Lincoln mentions Thomas by name in a most famous letter in which he explains his position on slavery in 1864. Thomas, newspaper editor/owner Albert G. Hodges and ex-Senator Archibald Dixon met with the President at the White House to discuss and protest Lincoln's decision to expand the black enrollment in Kentucky. The meeting provided Lincoln an opportunity to make a “little speech,” which he later summarized for Hodges in writing. Hodges, who was pro-Republican, writes on May 10, 1864, “Your views in regard to Slavery, as set forth in that little speech in your reception room, was so much in accordance with my own views and feelings...that I could not resist the temptation to ask the favor of you to write it out for me.” Lincoln's April 4 letter to Hodges contains one of the clearest statements of Lincoln’s views on slavery and the war. 
Letter from President Abraham Lincoln April 4, 1864, with his position on slavery, courtesy Library of Congress, Manuscript Division

   President Lincoln essentially installed Thomas, who had been recommended for promotion to Brigadier General in the Union Army, into the office of governor by posting Union soldiers at the polls in 1863. So Thomas, who believed Lincoln would save slavery, at first was a grateful Lincoln supporter who later turned into a mortal enemy when the black enrollment expanded, even campaigning against the President in 1864. And then Thomas became Lincoln's immortal friend when the President was assassinated at the end of the war. Thomas, a direct descendant of a grandfather who served as a Revolutionary War soldier and patriot in Virginia, no doubt was influenced to join the military by his ancestor's participation in the establishment of the United States of America in 1775-1783. The military traditions of Thomas's father Col. Ambrose Shrewsbury Bramlette...his paternal grandfather Corporal James Bramlette Sr...and paternal great-grandfather Rev. William Bramblett Jr....set family precedence for his own participation as a federal officer in an attempt to help preserve the Union during his generation's 1861-1865 war for freedom.
Slavery Caused the Civil War 
--Thomas Elliott Bramlette
(author emphases)
“...Ambitious men of the South, who first sought to create a sectional division upon the tariff, in order to build up a Government based upon the aristocracy of the slave-owner, having been foiled by the incorruptible patriotism and indomitable will of Andrew Jackson, next gave and accepted a sectional quarrel about the slave....” --1863
The Governor cites only the South for starting the war at first, but later changes his rhetoric to place blame equally on both regions.
 “...The blinded ambition and obduracy of Southern secessionists, persistently thrust forward the slave as the object of strife, although the [Lincoln] Administration and the ruling powers for more than one year waived it aside, and refused to accept the issue....” --1863
...After President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, in a speech about the war at the Louisville Court House, widely published in The New York Times and many other newspapers, the Governor invoked the then commonly used political flip flop voters know so well today to blame both “evil-disposed, selfish, sectional partisans in the North and South” who used Slavery as the means by which “to elevate or advance themselves or their party....” --1865
   In public speeches during and after the war in Kentucky, Thomas, who was an intelligent, informed, involved and politically savvy eyewitness to antebellum and then his own contemporary wartime history, made his war remarks in an address to the Kentucky Legislature in 1863: “Ambitious men of the South, who first sought to create a sectional division upon the tariff, in order to build up a Government based upon the aristocracy of the slave-owner, having been foiled by the incorruptible patriotism and indomitable will of Andrew Jackson, next gave and accepted a sectional quarrel about the slave” (author emphases). (U.S. President Andrew Jackson had averted secession by South Carolina and a civil war threatened because of import tariff and regional disagreements during the “Nullification Crisis” of 1828-1832: In a proclamation dated Dec. 10, 1832, Jackson reminded political leaders and the country that “disunion, by armed force” amounted to “treason,” and that the alliance of residents in all regions in America, protected by the U.S. Constitution, was a “Perpetual Union” of the people, not of the states. In 1860-1861 Abraham Lincoln based his Union policies in part on Jackson’s precedent.) Gov. Bramlette also indicated in his 1863 address that the secessionists themselves defined the war as a conflict about slavery. “The blinded ambition and obduracy of Southern secessionists, persistently thrust forward the slave as the object of strife, although the [Lincoln] Administration and the ruling powers for more than one year waived it aside, and refused to accept the issue.” He did identify the South as the aggressors, but later in 1865 after the war ended and after President Lincoln was assassinated, in a speech at the Louisville Court House, which was published in The New York Times and many other national and regional newspapers, the governor blamed “evil-disposed, selfish, sectional partisans in the North and South” (author emphasis) who used slavery as the means to an end--”to elevate or advance themselves or their party.”
   After Thomas left the governor's office, he moved to Louisville where he practiced law again and became involved in civic affairs. Thomas and Col. Reuben T. Durrettt began work in the early 1870s to create the "Free" Public Library of Kentucky with $400,000 obtained from a state authorized lottery. A broadside to advertise the event appeared in the Oct. 24, 1874, edition of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper to be distributed in Louisville (109).


 
Top image: Thomas is buried on the left, with Sarah in the middle and their son James next to her. Son William's marker is opposite his brother's stone in the other row, nearly obscured in the image by the sign pole, and their brother Simeon is buried next to William with no stone.Next is one grave, closest to the historical marker, that is empty. Daughter Corinne is buried in New York, and the other children, who all died young--Mary Adelia, Margaret Lee Ann, Ambrose Shrewsbury and Samuel Edward--are most likely buried at Elliott Graveyard. The second photo shows only the back row of the plot, with Thomas, left, and then Sarah, James. Third image shows four dark tombstones in the foreground Bramlette plot.
Thomas Elliott Bramlette's Marriages
   Thomas first married Sarah Leann “Sallie” Travis, the mother of his eight children, circa 1837. She was born to Mary Crockett and William Travis, members of two prominent families whose surnames are synonymous with exploration and adventure and inextricable from Kentucky, Tennessee and Texas military history. Sarah died in 1872, the same year two of her sons also died, in Louisville and was buried in the family plot, Section P, Range West Half, Lot 24, at Cave Hill Cemetery.
   Thomas second married on June 3, 1874, Mary E. Graham Adams, widow of Thomas Adams of New Orleans, La. Mary was born Nov. 26, 1832, to Teresa Sutton and Dr. Christopher Columbus Graham. (See his history below.) Mary died May 17, 1886, in Boyle Co., Ky., and was buried two days later beside her parents in Section 1, Lot 10, Bellevue Cemetery, 337 North First Street, Danville, Ky. (Her tombstone indicates she died May 8, 1886.) The inscription identifies her as "Wife of Gov. T. E. Bramlette" and "Mother." She had a child or children with Thomas Adams in Louisiana.
   Thomas and Mary did not have children. When he died intestate, she served as administrator of his estate and guardian of his surviving child, Corinne Belle, in Louisville, Jefferson Co., Ky., in 1875 (Court Order Book 34:467). Mary and Corinne moved to New York and then in 1883 Mary returned to live with her father in Danville, Boyle Co., Ky., where both later died.
  Thomas and Sarah's eight children are James Thompson, William L., Margaret Lee Ann, Ambrose Shrewsbury, Samuel Edward, Simeon Eugene, Corinne Belle and Mary Adelia Bramlette. (Thomas lost his first wife and two sons in 1872, according to death dates on their tombstones.)
Col. James Thompson Bramlette's tombstone at Cave Hill Cemetery
   Col. James Thompson Bramlette, first child of Sarah Leann “Sallie” Travis and Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Aug. 27, 1839, near Albany, Clinton Co., Ky. He died Feb. 10, 1872, in Louisville, Jefferson Co., Ky., and was buried in the family plot at Cave Hill Cemetery. James served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He was a lawyer. He did not marry.
Dr. William L. Bramlette's tombstone in the family plot at Cave Hill Cemetery.
   Dr. William L. Bramlette, second child of Sarah Leann “Sallie” Travis and Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Aug. 11, 1841, near Albany, Clinton Co., Ky. He died Aug. 8, 1872, in Louisville, Jefferson Co., Ky., and was buried in the family plot at Cave Hill Cemetery. His tombstone identifies him as Wm. L. Bramlette M. D. and provides his birth and death dates. William served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He was a medical doctor who took his lecture course in medicine in Louisville in 1869-1870. He did not marry.
   Margaret Lee Ann Bramlette, third child of Sarah Leann “Sallie” Travis and Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born May 27, 1844, in Clinton Co., Ky. She died young, perhaps in infancy, and may have been buried in Elliott Graveyard.
   Ambrose Shrewsbury Bramlette, fourth child of Sarah Leann "Sallie" Travis and Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Dec. 17, 1845, in in Clinton Co., Ky. He is the namesake of his grandfather. He died an infant and may have been buried in Elliott Graveyard.
   Samuel Edward Bramlette, fifth child of Sarah Leann "Sallie" Travis and Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Nov. 19, 1848, in Clinton Co., Ky. He died an infant and may have been buried in Elliott Graveyard.
   Dr. Simeon Eugene Bramlette, sixth child of Sarah Leann "Sallie" Travis and Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Nov. 4, 1851, near Albany, Clinton Co., Ky. He died Jan. 16, 1888, near Honey Grove, Lamar Co., Tex. His remains were transported by train to Louisville for burial in the family plot at Cave Hill Cemetery. He was a medical doctor. He did not marry.
Portrait of Corinne Belle Bramlette Walworth, daughter of Sarah and Thomas,
painted by Nicola Marschall, courtesy Kentucky Historical Society
   Corinne Belle Bramlette, seventh child of Sarah Leann “Sallie” Travis and Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Nov. 2, 1854, in Columbia, Clinton Co., Ky. She died in 1937 in Saratoga Springs, N. Y., and was buried there in Greenridge Cemetery. Corinne posed circa 1872-1875 for her portrait by Nicola Marschall. The noted painter was a Prussian immigrant who gained fame as “the Artist of the Confederacy” and “Artist of the Deep South” for his flag and uniform designs. He also painted portraits of American presidents, including Jefferson Davis and Abraham Lincoln, and a number of other historical figures and prominent citizens. Corinne moved to Saratoga Springs, N. Y., after her father died and before Dec. 20, 1883, when she married Francis Hardin “Frank” Walworth there. Frank, a member of a socially prominent, aristocratic, but troubled New York family, previously had been convicted of murdering his father, Mansfield Tracy Walworth, in 1873 to protect his mother, Ellen Hardin, and other family members from unrelenting threats and domestic violence. Frank was jailed for some time after being found guilty of patricide before pardoned in 1877 by the governor. (Frank's mother, Ellen Hardin Walworth, a native of Jacksonville, Ill., was a co-founder of Daughters of the American Revolution.) Frank and Corinne had one child, Clara Grant Walworth, before he died at the young age of 33 on Oct. 29, 1886. He also rests in Greenridge Cemetery. Clara was born in 1886. She did not marry; had no issue; died in 1952; shares a tombstone with her parents.
Corinne and husband, Frank Walworth, and daughter, Clara, are buried in Greenridge Cemetery, Saratoga Springs, N. Y.
   Mary Adelia Bramlette, eighth child of Sarah Leann "Sallie" Travis and Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Dec. 17, 1858, in Columbia, Adair Co., Ky. She died as a young child and may have been buried in Elliott Graveyard. An oil painting of her likeness is housed in Walworth Memorial Museum, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. The artist pictured her realistically to represent the only "flower" on the canvas: a lovely blond child wearing a light blue dress, anklets and Mary Jane shoes posed on a rock in a lush green garden with no other blossoms. The painting and other Bramlette possessions, including the family silver tea service, saved by servants who buried it in the garden during the Civil War, went to New York with Corinne. Later the artwork and different items and Walworth furnishings were donated to the museum by Corinne's daughter Clara.
Official Portrait, Governor Thomas Elliott Bramlette, courtesy Kentucky Historical Society

Biography of Thomas Elliott Bramlette in Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky, by H. Levin, editor Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago:
THOMAS E. BRAMLETTE, governor of Kentucky, was born in Cumberland county, January 3, 1817. Having obtained a good English education he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1837. In 1841 he was elected to the legislature, in 1849 he was appointed commonwealth's attorney, serving two years, and in 1852 removed to Columbia, Kentucky, where he practiced law until elected judge of the sixth judicial district. When the country became involved in the civil war he espoused the Union cause, receiving a colonel's commission, and raised the Third Kentucky Regiment of Infantry, entering the field at its head; but he resigned to become United States district attorney for Kentucky, to which office he was appointed February 27, 1863, by President Lincoln, and removed to Louisville. During his term of office the government tried and convicted Thomas C. Shackelford for treason, that being the only case of the kind recorded in the history of the country. In 1863 he was commissioned major-general and while organizing his division was nominated as the Union candidate for governor of Kentucky, which was followed by his election in August, by a large majority. During his service he was offered a seat in congress, but declined to become a candidate. In 1864 the convention in Louisville instructed their delegates to vote for McClellan and Bramlette as their candidates for president and vice-president, but he again declined to allow his name to be used. On his retirement from office he resumed the practice of law in Louisville. He was a warm advocate of the State Normal School and deeply interested in all that pertained to the progress and upbuilding of the state. He was married in September, 1837, to Sallie Travis, and after her death wedded Mrs. Mary E. Adams, June 3, 1874. He died in his Louisville home, January 12, 1875.
The Governor's walking stick and silver cane tip detail, courtesy Kentucky Historical Society


Former Kentucky Governor Bramlette in older years at Louisville, courtesy Kentucky Historical Society
Portrait of Sarah Leann "Sallie" Travis, first wife of Gov. Thomas Elliott Bramlette, courtesy Kentucky Historical Society
 Sarah "Sallie" Travis Bramlette memorialized as a replica in First Ladies Doll Collection in Frankfort, image by Deborah G. Dennis

Thomas Elliott Bramlette's tombstone in Cave Hill Cemetery
Tombstone of Mary E. Graham Adams Bramlette, second wife of Thomas Elliott Bramlette, who rests in Bellevue Cemetery,
 Danville, Boyle Co., Ky., next to her parents, Teresa Sutton and Dr. Christopher Columbus Graham Inscription: "In ...to the remembrance of Mother, Wife of Gov. T. E. Bramlette Born Nov. 26, 1832 Died May 8, 1886. Our Hope is in the Redeemer"


In July 1863 before Thomas Elliott Bramlette took office as governor, Confederate Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan and troops raided his family residence in Columbia, Adair Co., Ky., destroying property inside the house, ruining the library and scattering papers and books and personal items along the main streets of the town. Later as governor and commander-in-chief, Thomas took up arms and directly led his Union troops to fight off an attack by Morgan and his Men at Frankfort in 1864 during yet another of the Confederate partisan raider’s forays through Kentucky to confront Union troops. Image origin below unknown: Bramlett descendants Charles W. Hawkins, private, Company K, Seventh Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, and brother Thomas C. Hawkins, Private, Company C, Morgan’s Mounted Men, Partisan Rangers, Kentucky Cavalry Squadron, may be pictured. Charles Hawkins served under Gen. John Hunt Morgan briefly, for about a month, in 1862 before deserting and returning home to Frankfort, Ky. Thomas Hawkins served under Morgan and then in Duke's Kentucky Cavalry during 1862-1863. Charles and Thomas descend from Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White.
 Gov. Thomas Elliott Bramlette and Gen. John Bell Hood
As a Union officer and later Kentucky governor during the war, Thomas Elliott Bramlette opposed a different but equally imposing Confederate enemy, General John Bell Hood, below, also a native of Kentucky, who offered his military services to Thomas's predecessor, pro-Confederate Gov. Beriah Mcgoffin in a letter in January 1861, and happened to be one of Thomas's Callaway relatives through marriage. Gen. John Bell Hood is a direct descendant, a second-great-grandson, of Joseph Callaway II/Jr. of Essex Co., Va., and great-grandson of Col. Richard Callaway of Virginia and Kentucky. (Col. Richard Callaway, born 1717, is the brother of Elizabeth Callaway, born 1710, second wife of William Bramlett I/Sr., who married circa 1732, and the brother of Col. James Callaway, husband of Sarah Bramlett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr. and his first wife. Thomas Elliott Bramlette's direct ancestor is Rev. William Bramblett Jr., born 1719, son of William Bramlett I/Sr. and first wife, Unknown. Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett, born 1710, is Rev. William Bramblett Jr.'s stepmother.) Gen. John Bell Hood is the grandson of Keziah Callaway and James French and son of Theodosia French and Dr. John Willis Hood. Gen. John Bell Hood was born June 29, 1831, in Owensville, Bath Co., Ky. He served as a Confederate soldier and officer during the War Between the States from beginning to end despite serious wounds and losses of limbs. He married Anna Marie Hennen in New Orleans, La., after the war. She was a native of New Orleans. They had eleven children, including three sets of twins, between 1869-1879 in New Orleans, and both parents and one child died of yellow fever during an epidemic there in 1879.
  
Former Confederate General John Bell Hood settled in New Orleans after the war
John Bell Hood's Orphaned Children, descendants of Col. Richard Callaway
--

William Bramlett III and Sarah Jane Unknown
of Bedford Co., Va., and Darlington/Sumter Co., S. C.
(Children: Caroline Ann, Harriet Callaway, William Ballard, Jane McKinzia, James Henry, Elkanah Buford, Eliza Mary,
Andrew Jackson, Matilda Jane, Permelia Hancock, Emmaline T., Sarah Moriah, Washington Leonard Bramlett)

Some of the following about Sarah Jane and William III's son William Ballard Bramlett and grandson William Scell Bramlett is provided by "Cuz'n Ray," whose first name I only caught once when he wrote an email to ask about William III and Jane and many years ago then wrote again briefly, only signing his given name, about the information I sent: "Thanks so much," he wrote. "You were right and all these pieces have come together. Cuz'n Ray." So, Ray, if you see this post, please leave a note with your surname. Cuz'n Ray also provided Jane's first name: Sarah.
William Bramblett/Bramlett III, child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born circa 1774 in Bedford Co., Va. He died Dec. 24, 1840, in Sumter Co., S. C. His burial place is unknown. William moved from Virginia to South Carolina in 1800-1801. He lived in Darlington Co., S. C., in 1810-1830, and in Sumter Co., S. C., in 1840. His wife, Sarah Jane, lived in Sumter County in 1850. Her maiden name is unknown. (Jane is sometimes confused with the wife of another William Bramlett whose given name is not yet known and whose surname is Hendrix. This couple lived in Laurens and then Spartanburg Co., S. C., and moved to Kentucky and Tennessee.) Jane was born Feb. 19, 1786. She died Feb. 17, 1862, in Sumter County. Jane Bramlett, 63, $2,000 real estate, is listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Sumter, Sumter Co., S. C., with four grown children and two minor grandchildren, all born South Carolina: Caroline, 45; Eliza, 35; Emeline, 25; Washington, 21; and Madison, 16, and Napolean, 5 (NARA Film M432:859:369A). Jane Bramlet, 65 (73?), farmer, $2,500 real estate, $1,200 personal estate, is listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Sumter, Bishopville P. O., Sumter Co., S. C., with a daughter, Eliza, 40, and grandson, Napoleon, 15, farm laborer, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1227:98). Jane and William's birth years are inscribed in their family Bible. Many of Jane and William's children are named after his Bedford Co., Va., relatives: William, Callaway, Ballard, Elkanah, Buford, Permelia, Hancock. The children, listed in an 1846 family Bible record, with surname spelled "Bramlitt," are Caroline Ann, Harriet Callaway ("Henrietta"), William Ballard, Jane McKinzia, James Henry, Elkanah Buford, Eliza Mary, Andrew Jackson, Matilda Jane, Permelia Hancock, Emmaline T., Sarah Moriah, Washington Leonard Bramlett.
Bible Record of William and Sarah Jane Bramblett
of Darlington/Sumter South Carolina
HOLY BIBLE
MDCCXCVIII
Edinburgh
Printed by Mark and Charles Keern
His Majesty's Printers
Caroline Ann Bramlitt was Born February the 9 - 1804
and departed life December the 11 - 1854
Harriot Callaway Bramlitt was Born the 8 day of April 1805
William Ballard Bramlitt was Born on Wednesday the 25 of March 1807
Jane McKinzia Bramlitt was Born Friday the 16 September 1808
James Hennery Bramlitt was Born Wednesday the 15th of November 1809.
Departed this life in Chastn SC the 5 May 1826
Elkanah Buford Bramlitt was Born ... ... night the 21 of August 1811
Liza Mary Bramlitt was Born Wednesday night the 10 of March 1813
Jane McKenzia Bramlett died of the flux on Saturday night the 17 of December 1814
being Six years two Months and 30 Days old when she died
Andrew Jackson Bramlitt was Born on Wednesday night the 17 of January 1816
Lyddia Bramlitt was born Friday the 6 of February 1818 [crossed out]
Mattildey Jane Bramlitt was born Friday the 6 of February 1818
Permeley Hancock Bramlitt was born Saturday the 26 of July 1820
Emmoline T Bramlitt was born Tuesday the 26 of March 1822
Sarah Moriah Bramlitt was Born Wednesday the 25 of November 1824
[Unrelated note: Hariet Peclor 6 mile from Saulsbury has a brown Mare for sale $120]
Washington Leonard Bramlitt was Born Monday the 16 of March 1829
James Madison Bramlitt born the 5 day of July 1836
Nepolian Bonepart was born on Sunday one o'clock PM the 15 of June 1845
Eleneia [crossed out]
Elenna Elmore was born the 15 ___ 1846

William Bramlitt was [born] in the year 1774
Jane Bramlitt was born the 19 day of February 1786
departed life on the 17 of February 1862
Mary Groshon was born May 15 - 1784
(Identity Unknown)
Note from Dale Molina, Third Great Granddaughter of Jane and William Bramblett III: The above are Bible Records that were copied approximately 30 years ago. Upon comments from Charles Farmer that a Marion Beasley might have some Bramblett information, I pursued the idea and was able to talk to him. Indeed he had Bramblett information, he had the Bible Records of William and Jane Bramblett who lived in the Darlington/Sumter area of South Carolina that belonged to his cousin, Lucille Bradham of Bishopville. He stated that he copied them verbatim, errors and all. During the telephone conversation, he told me the names of the children and since I had researched the early Bramblett history, I was amazed at the names he had given me. They were names I had researched earlier. Mr. Beasley was not aware of the early Bramblett history so he did not know the scope of what he had given me. This was a link with the Bedford, Virginia Brambletts. [Also posted on Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center]
   Caroline Ann Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Feb. 9, 1804, in Darlington Co., S. C. She died Dec. 11, 1854.
   Harriet Callaway "Henrietta" Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born April 8, 1805, in Darlington Co., S. C. She may have died in 1862.
   William Ballard Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Wednesday, March 25, 1807, in Darlington Co, S. C. He died after 1869 and before 1876 in Ukiah or Los Angeles, Calif. He moved to Virginia where he married his first wife and had a child. They traveled from Virginia to San Francisco, Calif., by ship around the Horn of South America circa 1850. His first wife, Grace Ann Burwell Bristol, died at sea during their journey. William and his son William Scell Bramlett and Grace's son, Francis Bristol, settled in California. They first lived in San Joaquin County, according to a history of that place, in 1850 and then in Ukiah, Mendocino County, by 1852. Family tradition holds that the two half-brothers, William Scell Bramlett and Francis Bristol, had a close relationship throughout their lives. One source indicates William Ballard Bramlett second married Eleanor Smart on June 11, 1853, in San Joaquin. Other records identify her as Eleanor "Ellen" Patton Parker. Her given name is Eleanor "Ellen" Patton Smart. The name Parker from a former husband with whom she had children. One census indicates she had 18 children. She was born 1833 in Ohio. She died in 1905 and was buried in Downey District Cemetery, Los Angeles, Calif. Ellen and William Ballard's children are Andrew Jackson, Richard Peter, John H., Medora, A. Ballard ("Bally"), Twin Boys and Walter Bramlett. Ellen Smart Patton Parker second married Nicholas Keating/Keting in 1876. He was born 1818 in Ireland, immigrated in 1832. He died Aug. 20, 1913, at Sawtelle, Los Angeles, Calif., and was buried in Downey District Cemetery. Ellen Keating, 66, born 1833 Ohio to a mother born there, father born Pennsylvania, mother of 18 children 14 living, married 1876, 24 years, and husband, Nicholas Keting, 81, born 1819 Ireland to parents born there, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Downey, Los Angeles, Calif., with two grown children born California: Ballard Bramlett, 34, born 1863 to a mother born Ohio, father South Carolina, and William Keting, 19, born 1881, to a father born Ireland and mother born Ohio, both laborers (NARA Film T623:91:12B). Nicholas Keting's children are William and Alice Keating Reed. Another child may be Thomas D.. Keating, born circa 1832 in New York. Nicholas Kating, 92, born Ireland to parents born there, naturalized 1847, widowed, survivor of the Union Army, Civil War, is listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for Malibu, Los Angeles, Calif., living in the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (NARA Film T624:85:34A). Also listed there: Thomas D. Keating, 78, born New York to parents born Ireland, widowed, survivor of the Union Army, Civil War. Nicholas Keating enlisted as a private and sergeant, serving in Company F, First Regiment, U. S. Cavalry, and in Company H, First U. S. Dragoons, Regular Army, and served as a teamster in the Quarter Master's Dept., U. S. Army (NARA Film M233 Roll 25). He applied for and received a pension, application 178.043 certificate 213.371, based on his military service on Sept. 17, 1872, in California (NARA Pension Index Film T288:252). At the end of the war, he was transferred to serve in the government's military actions against Indians in the West. 
   William Scell Bramlett, child of William Ballard and Grace Ann Burwelll Bristol Bramlett, was born Aug. 10, 1847, in Richmond, Va. He died June 17, 1920, in Oakland, Calif.
   Andrew Jackson Bramlett, child of William Ballard and Elanor "Ellen" Smart (Patton Parker) Bramlett, was born Oct. 10, 1853, in Woodbridge, Calif. He died March 4, 1930, in Little Lake, Calif. He married a woman named Maggie circa 1878. She was born circa 1858 in Texas. She died after 1900. "Andrew J. Bramlette," 44, born California to a mother born Illinois, father Kentucky (actually Ohio and South Carolina), well borer, and wife, Maggie, 42, born April 1858 Texas to a mother born Kentucky, father Tennessee, mother of 10 children, 5 living, are listed in the 1900 U. S. Census for Downey, Los Angeles, Calif., with five grown and minor children, all except one (noted) born California: William W., 21. 1878; Laura E., 18, 1881 Arizona; David P., 11, 1888; Mirtle May, 7, 1892; Andrew J., 6, 1894 (NARA Film T623:91:12B).Their children include William W., Laura E., David P., Mirtle May and Andrew J. Bramlett Jr
   Richard Peter Bramlett, child of William Ballard and Elanor "Ellen" Smart (Patton Parker) Bramlett, was born May 26, 1854, in California. He died Dec. 23, 1922, near Lindsay, Calif., and was buried there three days later. He was a laborer who died after being struck by a car on the highway near Lindsay.
   John H. Bramlett, child of William Ballard and Elanor "Ellen" Smart (Patton Parker) Bramlett, was born June 14, 1858, in Ukiah, Calif. He died at 7 a. m. on Jan. 28, 1937, in a hospital at Big Pine, Calif., where he was buried. He was a laborer.
   Medora Bramlett, child of William Ballard and Elanor "Ellen" Smart (Patton Parker) Bramlett, was born circa 1859, probably in Ukiah, Calif.
   A. Ballard "Bally" Bramlett, child of William Ballard and Elanor "Ellen" Smart (Patton Parker) Bramlett, was born in California.
   Twin Boys Bramlett, children of William Ballard and Elanor "Ellen" Smart (Patton Parker) Bramlett, were born July 18, 1862, in Ukiah, Calif.
   Walter Bramlett, child of William Ballard and Elanor "Ellen" Smart (Patton Parker) Bramlett, was born in California.

   Jane McKinzia Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Friday, Sept. 16, 1808, in Darlington Co., S. C. She died of "flux" on Saturday night, Dec. 17, 1814, at age 6 years, 2 months and 30 days.
   James Henry Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1809, in Darlington Co., S. C. His entry in the family Bible indicates he died May 5, 1826, in Charleston, S. C.
   Elkanah Buford Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Aug. 21, 1811, in Darlington Co., S. C.
   Eliza Mary Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Wednesday night, March 10, 1813, in Darlington Co., S. C. She may have died in 1886 in Sumter Co., S. C. She married Simpson Barrnes. He was born circa 1836. "Eliza Barnes," 21, and husband, Simpson, 24, farmer, $60 personal estate, both born South Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Bishopville, Sumter Co., S. C. (NARA Film M653:1227:98).
   Andrew Jackson Bramlett, child of Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born on Wednesday night, Jan. 17, 1816, in Darlington Co., S. C. He may have died in 1860 in Sumter County.
   Matilda Jane "Matildey" Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Friday, Feb. 6, 1818, in Darlington Co., S. C. She died Jan. 1, 1893, in Sumter Co., S. C. She married Pinkney Skinner. "Matilda Skinner," 39, is listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Bishopville P. O., Sumter Co., S. C., with one grown child, Eliza Skinner, 20, both born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1227:98).
   Permelia Hancock "Permeley" Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Saturday, July 26, 1820, in Darlington Co., S. C.
   Emmaline T. "Emmoline" Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Tuesday, March 26, 1822, in Darlington Co., S. C. She was declared dead, whereabouts unknown, in 1860 to allow her siblings to settle their mother's estate. Not much is known about Emma. She lived with her mother in 1850 in Sumter County, then left her son, Napoleon Bonaparte Bramlett, in the care of her mother and moved from home.
   Napolean Bonapart Bramlett, son of Emmaline T. Bramlett and grandson of Jane and William Bramlett III, was born Sunday at one o'clock p. m. on June 15, 1845, in Lee or Sumter Co., S. C. He died May 11, 1912, and was buried in Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery, Bishopville, S. C., with an inscribed tombstone shared with his wife. Napoleon married Mary Annette Barnes Aug. 30, 1865, in Sumter Co., S. C. She was born May 26, 1840, the daughter of Sarah Kizziah Scarborough and Hymbrick "Henry" Barnes. Mary died Aug. 8, 1925, in Lee Co., S. C., and was buried beside Napoleon in Bethany Cemetery. Napoleon lived with his grandmother, Jane Bramlett, in 1850-1860. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted Dec. 28, 1861, at Camp Hampton, S. C., as a private in Capt. J. Green's Company E, Nineteenth Regiment, South Carolina Infantry Volunteers. He was discharged Jan. 22, 1863 (NARA Film M267 Roll 304). His NARA Compiled Military Records indicate he also second enlisted June 17, 1863, at Sumter, S. C., as a private in Company E, Third (Palmetto) Battalion, (P.B.L.A.) South Carolina Light Artillery (Film M267 Roll 76). He was severely wounded in the side and hand Aug. 30, 1863, at Morris Island S. C. He was listed as ill/hospitalized in August-December 1863 and returned to duty January or February 1864. He was on detached duty in the Quartermaster’s Department from Feb. 29, 1864, until December 1864. After he died, his wife, Mary Annett Bramlett, applied for a widow's pension, filed Oct. 6, 1919, at Bishopville, Lee Co., S.C. Two veterans on Oct. 31, 1919, verified Napoleon's military service: J. A. Mosely and G. H. Reid. Napoleon and Mary's children include Robert James, John Madison, C. Susan, Ella Lilly, Albert Shipp, Elizabeth Nancy, Roderick H. and Christopher Sumter "Sump" Bramlett.

Napoleon Bonaparte Bramlett, courtesy Charles W. Farmer




Napoleon Bonaparte Bramlett and wife, Mary Barnes, courtesy Charles W. Farmer
Napoleon in later years, courtesy Charles W. Farmer
   Sarah Mariah "Moriah" Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Wednesday, Nov. 25, 1824, in Darlington Co., S. C. She died after 1880 and before 1900. She married Robert L. Elmore Sr. circa 1846. He was born circa 1823 and died after 1900, most likely in Sumter Co., S. C. "Sarah M. Elmore," 23, and husband, Robt., 26, planter, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Sumter, Sumter Co., S. C., with two children, all born South Carolina: Elenora, 3, and Caroline C., 1 (NARA Film M432:859:369A). Sarah and Robert's children include Eleanor ("Elenora" "Elenna"), Caroline C., Francis, Victoria, Jane, Mary, Adriana ("Addie"), Robert L. Elmore Jr.
   Eleanor "Elenora" "Elenna" Elmore, child of Sarah Mariah Bramlett and Robert L. Elmore, was born circa 1846. She died after 1870 in Of Swimming Pen Twp., Sumter Co., S. C.
   Caroline C. Elmore, child of Sarah Mariah Bramlett and Robert L. Elmore, was born circa 1849. She died before 1870.
   Francis Elmore, child of Sarah Mariah Bramlett and Robert L. Elmore, was born circa 1851.
   Victoria Elmore, child of Sarah Mariah Bramlett and Robert L. Elmore, was born circa 1852.
   Jane Elmore, child of Sarah Mariah Bramlett and Robert L. Elmore, was born circa 1856.
   Mary Elmore, child of Sarah Mariah Bramlett and Robert L. Elmore, was born circa 1858.
   Adriana "Addie" Elmore, child of Sarah Mariah Bramlett and Robert L. Elmore, was born May 29, 1860, in Kershaw Park Twp., Charleston Co., S. C. She married John Alfred Coghlan and had children.
   Robert L. Elmore, child of Sarah Mariah Bramlett and Robert L. Elmore, was born circa 1865. He died after 1880.
   Washington Leonard Bramlett, child of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born Monday, March 16, 1829, in Darlington Co., S. C. He died sometime after 1880 and probably before 1885, perhaps in Jefferson Co., Fla. He lived with his mother in Sumter Co., S.C., in 1850. He served as a private in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted June 5, 1862, at Camp Leon, Fla., as a substitute for J. E. Winck. He served in Captain Charles E. Dyke and Captain Robert Gamble’s Company, Florida Light Artillery. His company participated in the battles of St. John's Island and Olustee in Florida, armed with two three-inch rifle and two twelve-pound howitzers. Washington was listed as AWOL, actually a prisoner of war, on Dec. 23, 1864. He was paroled May 12, 1865, in Tallahassee, Fla., after his company surrendered there. His vital statistics, recorded when he was paroled, indicate he was six feet tall with blue eyes, a light complexion and light hair. Washington first married Julia Hanes on April 12, 1857, in Jefferson Co., Fla. Their children include John, Laura E., Joseph, Ann, Perry Madison, Francis Norah, and Allice Bramlett. Washington second married Beaty Ann "Brady" Hanes on Oct. 5, 1873, in Jefferson Co., Fla. Their children are Lula and William and perhaps Lon and Jim Bramlett. After Washington died, Beaty Ann later married Alexander Ward on Jan. 27, 1892, in Jefferson Co., Fla.

   James Madison Bramlett, child or grandchild of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III, was born July 5, 1836.
Works Cited For William Bramlett III
Bramlett, William. Holy Bible Records. Edinburgh: Mark and Charles Keern, His Majesty's Printers, MDCCXCVIII. Names, birth and death dates of children of William and Jane Bramlett of Darlington and Sumter Co., S. C.

Molina, Dale. "Bible Records" of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III of Bedford Co., Va., and Darlington and Sumter Co., S. C., in the possession of Lucille Bradham and cousin, Marion Beasley. Same records provided to author via email. Dale Molina posted a transcript of the Bible record inscriptions on Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center (BBIC): http://www.bramblett.com/document/bible2.htm.
Reuben Bramblett and Sarah "Sally" Abston
(Children: )
   Reuben Bramblett, child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born circa 1776 in Bedford Co., Va. He died in Bedford Co., Va., where he lived. He married Sarah "Sally" Abston on Dec. 7, 1790, in Bedford County.

Mary "Molly" Bramlett and Stephen Dooley
(Children: )
   Mary "Molly" Bramblett, child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born circa 17 in Bedford Co., Va. She married Stephen Dooley there on July 24, 1781. 

Mildred "Milley" Bramlett and John Hancock
(Children: )
   Mildred "Milley" Bramblett, child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born circa 17 in Bedford Co., Va. She married John Hancock there Sept. 1, 1789, with consent of her mother, Anna Bramblett. Her brother James Bramblett (Bramlettte Sr.) signed the marriage bond as surety/witness.

Lydia "Lydda" Bramlett and John Quinn
(Children: )
   Lydia "Lydda" Bramblett, child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born circa 17 in Bedford Co., Va. She married John Quinn there March 16, 1790, with consent of her mother, Anna Bramblett.

Lucy Bramlett and Patrick Nenney
(Children: )
   Lucy Bramblett, child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born circa 17 in Bedford Co., Va. She married Patrick Nenney there on June 20, 1796, with consent of her mother, Anna Bramblett. Lucy died in Tennessee.



   Ellen Hunt Graham and Thomas Patton tombstone
Hugh Graham
William Graham

   Charles Patrick Nenney, descendant of Lucy Bramblett and Patrick Nenney
Charles Patrick Nenny's residence in Tennessee was constructed circa 1820. During 1863-1864,
the home served as headquarters of Gen. Longstreet during the Civil War/War Between the States.

Matilda Bramlett and Jesse Watson
(Children: )
   Matilda Bramblett, child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born in Bedford Co., Va.

Elkanah Bramlett and Sarah J. Lofton
(Children: )
   Elkanah Bramblett, child of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., was born circa 1778-1779 in Bedford Co., Va. He died after 1830 in Greene Co., Ill., where he and his family lived at that time. "Elkanah Bramlet," free white male 21 and upwards, is listed in the 1820 U. S. Census for Wayne Co., Ill., as head of a family that includes two free white females under 21 and a free white male under 21. He married Sarah J. Lofton. She lived in Jersey Co., Ill., in 1840-1860.
--

Chapter 5:
Generation 3
SARAH BRAMLETT and JAMES CALLAWAY and LEONARD “LINUS” BROWN
(Children: Elizabeth, Susan, Mary, Flanders, Dudley, Chesley, James, Micajah, Edmund, William)
Col. James Callaway served as an officer during the American Revolution
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
   Sarah "Sallie" Bramlett, child of First Wife Unknown and William Bramlett I/Sr., was born circa 1720-1730 in Colonial Virginia. Sarah died circa 1800-04, perhaps in Bedford Co., Va., where she lived near her father and siblings. (William I/Sr., born in/before 1694, is the only Bramlett in existing Bedford County records old enough to be the father of Sarah.) Her burial place is unknown. She first married a step-uncle, Col. James Callaway Sr., circa 1746 in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. James was born circa 1720-1724 in Colonial Virginia, the son of Joseph Callaway II/Jr. and brother of Elizabeth Callaway, second wife of William Bramlett I/Sr. (Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett was born in 1710, according to Callaway Family Association Historian the late Bobbie Callaway, the same time as William Bramlett I/Sr.'s son Henry Bramlett Sr. Some researchers identify Joseph's wife as Catherine, perhaps Brown or Browning; but CFA has no documentation for her. She and Joseph II/Sr. and son Joseph III reportedly died of a fever in or before 1732.) Col. James Callaway Sr. died in 1767. Sarah second married Leonard "Linus" "Linah" Brown. Sarah's connection to the Bramlett and Callaway families is documented by her great-granddaughter Josephine Lindsay O'Neal Wigginton in a March 15, 1896, query published in the “Genealogical and Historical Column” of the Louisville, Ky., Courier-Journal:
Calloway--My grandmother was Mary Calloway, a daughter of James Calloway and Sallie Bramlet. Their sons were Flanders, Dudley, Chelsey, James, Micajah, Edmund and William [and John]. The daughters were Elizabeth, Susan and Mary, my grandmother. Flanders Calloway married Jemima Boone, daughter of Daniel. Elizabeth was in the skiff with Frances Calloway [daughters of Richard] and Jemima Boone when captured that fatal Sunday afternoon [in 1776]. They were rescued on Tuesday. Have heard my mother tell of their wonderful fortitude and presence of mind. Micajah and James Calloway were taken prisoners by the Indians at Blue Lick. Micajah remained a prisoner five years and was but seventeen when he reached home. Don’t know of any other connection between the Boone and Calloway families. Mrs. J. W.
A little detective work and several hours of research facilitated the identification of the mysterious and wonderful "Mrs. J. W." and a resulting article published in the February 2013 Callaway Family Association Newsletter titled "Mystery Solved: 'Mrs. J. W.' -- Josephine (Lindsay) O'Neal Wigginton." Josephine lived in Carroll Co., Ky., before and after her residency in Louisville in 1896 and later in 1900-1910. Josephine's mother is Eudocea “Docia” Baker, who first married John Scruggs and second married Gen. Jesse Cole Lindsay. Josephine is granddaughter of Mary “Polly” Callaway and Joshua Baker; and great-granddaughter of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and her first husband, Col. James Callaway Sr. Josephine's second great-grandfathers are Joseph Callaway II/Jr. and William Bramlett I/Sr.
   James Callaway Sr. and his brothers Richard and Thomas Callaway and the latter’s son Charles entered a land patent for 4,800 acres on Beaver’s Creek in Lunenburg (now Pittsylvania) Co., Va., in 1746. When James died intestate in 1767, his wife, Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett Callaway, and his brother John Callaway both served as administrators of his estate in Bedford County. They filed an inventory there that year on Nov. 20, 1767: "1 bay horse, 5_ bay mares, 12 fillys, 19 hogs, 3 cows, 1 set of smith’s tools, 12 sheep and 1 lame mare” (WB-1:191). Also listed: cash amounting to 29 pounds, 16 shillings, 10 pence. Witnesses include Zach Morris and Jacob Anderson. Sarah finally settled her husband’s estate in Bedford County Court in August 1773:
3 Aug 1773 Mrs. Sarah Callaway To the Estate of James Callaway, Dec’d To the amount of Goods of the appraisement £142_11_11 1/2. By amount of Debts due by the Estate which she has paid as pr. accts. .£45_15_1/2; £32_5_7 1/4; £64_11_2 3/4Acct of James Callaway Dec’d Balance of £64_11_2 3/41773 Sept 28 W. Read Robert Cowan William Austin (WB-1:197)
Sarah’s account indicates the estate was valued at £142 with £45 debt. Her share of the estate amounted to £32, and her children’s share £64 (WB-1:197). After she had second married Leonard “Leo” “Linus” “Linah” “Liner” Brown, Sarah Brown appeared in court in Bedford County on Feb. 28, 1780, to relinquish her dower claim on two hundred acres of land formerly owned by her deceased husband, James Callaway, which was sold by her brother-in-law John Callaway to Peter Forguerson. Col. James was a planter in Bedford County. He served as an officer in the Bedford County Militia during the French and Indian War in 1758.
   Sarah (Bramlett) Callaway second married Leonard Brown in Bedford County sometime after she settled James Callaway’s estate in 1773. They may have married after Sarah’s son Chesley Callaway was noted as an orphan on Nov. 28, 1774, in Bedford County Court records. Sarah appeared Feb. 28, 1780, in court in Bedford County to relinquish a dower claim on the land once owned by her deceased first husband, James Callaway. Sarah signed her name as “Sarah Brown” when she gave consent on the marriage bond of her daughter Mary “Polly’’ Callaway and William North on June 8, 1781. Sarah’s second husband, Leonard Brown, died by July 28, 1781: “Sarah Brown, widow and relic of Leod. Brown, deceased,” appeared in Bedford County court, gave bond and security and was granted administration of his estate on that date (WB-6:326). An inventory and appraisement of the estate of “Liner Brown, deceased” was returned and ordered to be recorded there on Nov. 26, 1781 (WB-6:26). James and Sarah’s known children include Elizabeth, Flanders, Dudley, James Jr., Micajah, Chesley, John, Edmund, Susannah, Mary “Polly” and William Callaway. Sarah and Leonard did not have children together. Leonard Brown’s children with a previous wife are Sarah and James Brown, born circa 1773.
   Elizabeth Callaway, first child of Sarah Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born circa 1749-51 in Lunenburg or Bedford Co., Va. She died after her husband wrote his will in April 1818, perhaps in Nelson, Ky. Elizabeth Callaway married Thomas Barnes in 1766 in Bedford Co., Va., with the consent of her father, which indicates she was a minor. Their marriage bond, dated Sept. 9, 1766, is signed by her father, James Callaway, and by John Talbot, surety/witness. Thomas was born circa 1745 in Virginia. He died in April 1818 in Bath Co., Ky. He named his twelve children and his wife, Elizabeth, in his Feb. 1, 1818, will, witnessed by Robert Bailey (son-in-law), William Heat and Reuben Staton and probated in April 1818 (WB-A:190). Thomas and Elizabeth lived in Montgomery, Ky., in 1810: Thomas Barnes, white male 45 and over, with a female 45 and over (wife, Elizabeth), and eight others: two females 26-44, three females 16-25, a male 16-25, a female 10-15 and a male 10-15 (NARA Film M252:7:364). Thomas Sr. and Elizabeth’s children include Thomas Jr., Abel, James, Elizabeth, Sarah, Frances, Nancy, Sophia, William B., Mary, John W., Dorothy Barnes.
   Thomas Barnes Jr., child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born circa 1768 in Virginia. He died sometime after 1818.
   Abel Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born circa 1770 in Virginia. He died after 1818.
   James Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born circa 1772 in Virginia. He died after 1818.
   Elizabeth Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born circa 1774 in Virginia. She died after 1818. 
   Sarah Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born circa 1783 in Virginia. She died after 1818.
   Frances “Fanny” Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born circa 1786 in Virginia. She died after 1818.
   Nancy Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born circa 1787-89 in Virginia. She died Feb, 5, 1825, in Bath Co., Ky. She married Robert Bailey. He was born circa 1775, the child of Agnes and William Bailey. Robert died in 1819. Robert and Nancy’s children are John, Mary (“Polly”), Elizabeth and William Elijah Bailey.
   John Bailey, child of Nancy Barnes and Robert Bailey, was born in Virginia. He died circa 1837.
   Mary “Polly” Bailey, child of Nancy Barnes and Robert Bailey, was born in Virginia.
   Elizabeth Bailey, child of Nancy Barnes and Robert Bailey, was born circa 1808 in Owensville, Bath Co., Ky. She married William Ashley. He was born circa 1805.
   William Elijah Bailey, child of Nancy Barnes and Robert Bailey, was born circa 1810 in Bath Co., Ky. He died there circa 1845. He married Mary England on June 23, 1833. She was born circa 1811 in Bath Co., Ky. She died there July 30, 1895. Mary and William’s children are Robert, William David, Melissa Malvina and William E. Bailey. Mary second married Fielder Moreland circa 1848. He was born in 1792-94. He died in 1876. Mary Moreland, 40, and husband, Fielder, 56, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 1, Bath Co., Ky., with ten grown and minor children: Robert Bailey, 14; David Bailey, 11; Malvina Bailey, 9; William Bailey, 7; Alexander Moreland, 20; Elizabeth Moreland, 19; Sarah A. Moreland, 11; Lydia M. Moreland, 9; Nancy J. Moreland, 2; John J. Moreland, 1 (NARA Film M432:191:77B-78A). Mary Moreland, 48, born Kentucky, and husband, Fielding B., 68, born in Maryland, farmer, $510 real estate, $250 personal estate, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Eastern Dist., Augusta P.O., Bracken Co., Ky., with three grown and minor children born Kentucky: William Baley, 17, farm laborer; John G. Moreland, 11; and John G. Moreland, 9 (NARA Film M653:357:103). Fielder and Mary’s children are Nancy J., John J., Fielder Henry and Joseph Moreland.
   Robert Bailey, child of William Elijah and Mary (England) Bailey, was born circa 1836 in Bath Co., Ky. He died there in 1912. He married a woman named Nancy. She was born circa 1837. Their children are Thomas G., Mary E., John and Sanford B. “Sam” Bailey.


William David Bailey, son of William Elijah and Mary (England) Bailey
William David Bailey’s wife, Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, front left; her mother, Lucretia Clayton Atchison Wright; William David and Melissa Bailey’s son Thomas Jefferson Bailey with children Kathleen and David Bailey, standing.

   William David Bailey, child of William Elijah and Mary (England) Bailey, was born July 18, 1838, in Bath Co., Ky. He died there Feb. 2, 1872, and was buried there in Bailey-Williams Cemetery. His grave marker indicates he was a Mason, born July 18, 1838. He married Melissa Atchison on Oct. 19, 1857. She was born Sept. 8, 1840 in Bath County, the daughter of Lucretia Lawrena or Clarinda Clayton and Samuel Crain Atchison. Melissa died Oct. 14, 1932, at Lee’s Summit, Jackson Co., Mo., and was buried there in Lee’s Summit Historical Cemetery. “David Bailey,” 32, farmer, $1,200 real estate, $250 personal estate, and wife, Melissa, 29, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Mudlick, Olympian Springs P. O., Bath Co., Ky., with seven children: Thomas, 13; William, 11; Charles, 9; Mary, 7; Lulu, 6; Elizabeth, 4; Edward, 4 (NARA Film M593:446:40B). Also listed: Nancy Stevens, 69, housekeeper, and Robert Moore, 25, farmer, $1,800 real estate, $180 personal estate. All were born in Kentucky. David and Melissa’s children are Thomas Jefferson, William Warren, Charles Robert, Mary Ellen, Lulu, Elisabeth Belle, Edward David and Ida P. Bailey.
   Thomas Jefferson Bailey, child of William David and Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, was born circa 1858. His children are David and Kathleen Bailey.
   William Warren Bailey, child of William David and Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, was born circa 1859.
   Charles R. Bailey, child of William David and Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, was born circa 1861.
   Mary E. Bailey, child of William David and Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, was born circa 1863.
   Lulu Bailey, child of William David and Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, was born circa 1864.
   Elisabeth Belle Bailey, child of William David and Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, was born circa 1866.
   Edward Bailey, child of William David and Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, was born circa 1866.
   Ida P. Bailey, child of William David and Melissa (Atchison) Bailey, was born circa 1870 or later.
   Melissa Malvina Bailey, child of William Elijah and Mary (England) Bailey, was born circa 1841 in Bath Co., Ky.
   William E. Bailey, child of William Elijah and Mary (England) Bailey, was born April 10, 1843, in Bath Co., Ky. He died from pneumonia and stomach cancer on Aug. 12, 1914, in Harrison Co., Ky., and was buried in Fosters Chapel.
   Sophia Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born in Virginia or Kentucky.
   William B. Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born in Virginia or Kentucky.
   Mary Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born in Virginia or Kentucky.
   John W. Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born in Virginia or Kentucky.
   Dorothy Barnes, child of Elizabeth Callaway and Thomas Barnes Sr., was born in Virginia or Kentucky.

Some of the following information is provided by the late Mary Mortimeyer of Cameron, Mo.; Frances Revesz of Park Ridge, Ill., and Roy E. Callaway of Indianapolis, Ind. James William Terry also contributed information from the research of Chris Schultheis, Paul Purdom, Oma O’Bryan, Beatrice Smith and Frank Neher.
   Flanders Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born 1752 in Bedford Co., Va. He died 1829. He married Jemima Boone, daughter of legendary frontiersman Daniel Boone. Jemima was born 1762 in North Carolina. She died in 1834. Both are buried in Missouri. Both are Patriots of the American Revolution. They participated in defense during the Siege of Fort Boonesborough, Kentucky Territory.
   Dudley Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. 
   James Callaway Jr., child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. 
   Micajah Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. 
   Chesley Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born in 1760 in Bedford Co., Va. He died in 1846. He married Christina G. She was born in 1760. She died in 1840.
   John Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. 
   Edmund Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. 
   Susannah Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va.
   Mary “Polly” Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born Feb. 3, 1765, in Bedford Co., Va. She died circa 1852 in Owen Co., Ky. Polly first married William North on June 8, 1781, in Bedford County. Polly’s mother, Sarah (Bramlett Callaway) Brown, gave consent and permission and Lance Woodward, Surety, witnessed their marriage bond, dated June 1, 1781. Polly and William North’s children are John North, born before 1789, and William North Jr., born circa 1782. After William North Sr. died, Polly reportedly moved to Jessamine Co., Ky., in 1789 and then to Owen Co., Ky., in 1796. She second married Joshua Baker circa 1789-90 in Fayette (later Jessamine) Co., Ky. Mary Polly and Joshua Baker’s children are Buford/Bluford, Sophia, Polina/Paulina, Pamila, Jesse C., Eudocea (“Docia” “Dotia”), Greenup, William, Malinda, Shelby and Lutitia/Letitia Baker.
   John North, child of Mary “Polly” Callaway and William North Sr., was born before 1789. He was living in Gallatin Co., Ky., in 1817 and witnessed a marriage bond there for his step-sister Docia Baker and John Scruggs.
   William North Jr., child of Mary “Polly” Callaway and William North Sr., was born circa 1782 in Bedford Co., Va. He married Elizabeth Lyons.
   Buford/Bluford Baker, child of Mary “Polly” Callaway and Joshua Baker, died young.
   Sophia Baker, child of Mary “Polly” Callaway and Joshua Baker, was born circa 1793. She died Sept. 24, 1878. She married Robert Vallandingham. She second married Daniel Watson “David” Call. He was born circa 1807 in Kentucky. He died after 1850. “Sophia Call,” 57, and husband, Daniel W., 43, farmer, $26,400 real estate, both born Kentucky, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 1, Owen Co., Ky., with five children born Kentucky: Letitia, 16; Lucinda, 15; Sally, 12; Wallace, 7; and David W., 4 (NARA Film M432:216:238A).
   Polina/Paulina Baker, child of Mary “Polly” Callaway and Joshua Baker, was born Feb. 15, 1794. She died July 26, 1840. She married Thomas Easterday.
   Pamila Baker, child of Mary “Polly” Callaway and Joshua Baker, was born circa 1795. She married Richard H. Orr in 1817.
   Jesse C. Baker, child of Mary “Polly” Callaway and Joshua Baker, was born Oct. 15, 1796. He died Nov. 22, 1870. He married Elizabeth C. “Betsy” Glazebrook Davis.
  
Tombstones of Eudocia "Docia" "Dotia" Baker and Gen. Jesse Cole Lindsay, Ghent Masonic Cemetery
   Eudocea “Docia” “Dotia” Baker, child of Mary “Polly” and Joshua Baker, was born . She died and was buried there in Ghent Masonic Cemetery. She first married John Scruggs in Virginia. Their chilld is Telitha Jane Scruggs. Eudocea second married Gen. Jesse Cole Lindsay. He was born between 1780-1790. He died and was buried in Ghent Masonic Cemetery. Jesse (Cole) Lindsay, white male 50-60, employed in agriculture, is listed in the 1840 U. S. Census for Gallatin Co., Ky., as head of a family that includes a female 40-50 (wife, Eudocea “Docia” “Dotia” Baker Scruggs), a male 30-40 (son of Jesse and first wife, Priscilla Ficklin?) and two males 15-20 (sons of Jesse and first wife, Priscilla Ficklin?), and three other younger children: a female 10-15 (Telitha Jane Scruggs?), a female 5-10 (Priscilla Lindsay), and a female under 5 (Josephine) (NARA Film M704:107:156A-B). Also listed are three black slaves: a female 36-55, a male 36-55 and a male under 5. “Eudocea ['Docia' 'Dotia'] Lindsay," 52, and husband, Jessee Lindsay, 60, farmer, $8,000 real estate, head of the family, are listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Ghent P.O., Dist. 1, Carroll Co., Ky., with three children: Priscilla, 18; Josephine, 12; and Jessee W. (William), 10, and one other: Jay Martin, 17, farmer, all born Kentucky (NARA Film M432:195:166A). “Eudocea ['Docia' 'Dotia'] Lindsey,” 62, and husband, Jesse (Cole) Lindsey, 69, farmer, $11,000 real estate, $4,000 personal estate, head of the family, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Ghent P.O., Dist. 1, Carroll Co., Ky., with two grown children: Josephine, 22, and Jesse Wm., 19, student (NARA Film M653:361:80). All were born in Kentucky. Docia and Jesse's children are Priscilla, Josephine and Jesse William Lindsay.
   Priscilla “Aunt Puss” Lindsay, child of Eudocea “Docia” “Dotia” Baker Scruggs and Gen. Jesse Cole Lindsay, was born circa 1830-1835 in Gallatin or Carroll Co., Ky.
Josephine Lindsay O’Neal Wigginton’s tombstone in Ghent Masonic Cemetery, Carroll Co., Ky., courtesy J. L. Cobb.
Tombstones of her parents, in same plot, in the background. Portrait, right, of Josephine Lindsay O’Neal Wigginton
   Josephine "Josie" "Jo" Lindsay, child of Eudocea “Docia” “Dotia” Baker Scruggs and Gen. Jesse Cole Lindsay, was born June 17, 1837, in Gallatin or Carroll Co., Ky. Josephine lived with her parents in Carroll Co., Ky., in 1840, 1850 and 1860. Josephine first married John Oliver O’Neal on Oct. 13, 1861, in Carroll Co., Ky. (MB-2:230). He was born Nov. 14, 1834, in Scott Co., Ky., the son of Mary Miller and John O’Neal. John Oliver O'Neal died June 6, 1869, and was buried at Ghent Masonic Cemetery, Carroll Co., Ky. He lived with his father and stepmother in 1850 and 1860. John (Oliver) O’Neal, 15, is listed in the 1850 U. S. Census for Dist. 1, Carroll Co., Ky., with father, John, 59, and stepmother, Nancy (Littrell), and siblings (Edward, 34; David, 25; Tabitha, 21; Sarah, 17; Marcellia, 4; Georgett, 1), all born Kentucky (NARA Film M432:195:165B). John O. O’Neal, 23, clothing store, $800 personal estate, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Ghent P. O., Carroll Co., Ky., living with his father, John O’Neal, 69, farmer, $16,500 real estate, $6,750 personal estate, and stepmother, Nancy S. (Littrell) O’Neal, 30, and six siblings (Edward, 40; David M., 30, trader, $500 real estate, $2,000 personal estate; Marcella, 12; Georgett, 9; Benj. P., 7; Walton, 5) and one other (Mary E. Whitehead, 12), all born Kentucky (NARA Film M653:361:96). John Oliver O’Neal and Josephine’s children are John Jesse O’Neal, born and died in 1866, and Mary O’Neal, born March 7, 1868, and died on July 18, 1948, in Henry Co., Ky. She was buried beside her second husband, Maurice Willis, in Ghent Masonic Cemetery. Josephine and her surviving child, Mary, lived with her father in Ghent, Ky., the following year after John died: "Josephine O’Neal," 33, keeping house, $1,500 real estate, and child, Mary O’Neal, 2, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Ghent, Carroll Co., Ky., living with her father, Jessee Lindsay, 80, retired farmer, $2,500 real estate, $2,000 personal estate, head of the family (NARA Film M593:454:39B). All were born in Kentucky.
   Josephine second married Sanford Wigginton on Nov. 30, 1871, about a year after his first wife died of consumption and about two years after Josephine’s first husband died. Sanford was born circa 1836 in Scott Co., Ky., the son of Susan Smith and Spencer Wigginton. Sandford Wigginton, 14, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 2, Scott Co., Ky., living with his parents, Spencer Wigginton, 57, farmer, $10,200 real estate, head of the family, and Susan Wigginton, 52, and five siblings (Milton, 18; Milus, 12; Anne, 9; Mary C., 8; Melinda, 6), all born Kentucky (NARA Film M432:218:469A). Sanford first married Sarah Jane Calvert Nov. 29, 1857, in Scott Co., Ky. Sarah was born circa 1838, the daughter of Elizabeth Lindsay and Obediah “Obed” Calvert. Sarah J. Calvert, 12, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 2, Scott Co., Ky., with parents, Obadiah Calvert, 51, and Elizabeth Calvert, 44, and eight siblings (John A. 20; Preston, 18, laborer; Susan, 15; Alice, 9; Mary, 8; Martha, 7; William O., 5; Lewilna, 1), all born Kentucky (NARA Film M432:218:470A). Sanford Wigginton, 25, farmer, and first wife, Sarah J. (Calvert) Wigginton, 22, housekeeper, both born Kentucky, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for White Sulphur P. O., Dist. 1, Scott Co., Ky. (NARA Film M653:394:893).
Union Guards and Confederate POWs shown at Camp Douglas, Illinois, during the war
   Sanford Wigginton served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he enlisted Sept. 2, 1862, as a private in Capt. G. M. Tilford’s Company, Smith’s Regiment, later Company B, Fifth Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, at Lexington, Ky. (Film M319 Roll 35). He also served between Dec. 31, 1862, and Sept. 1, 1863, with Capt. James E. Quantrill’s Company C, Morgan’s Mounted Men. Sanford was captured Aug. 21, 1864, at Rogersville, Tenn., and held as a prisoner of war at Louisville until he was sent to Chattanooga, Tenn., on Sept. 13, 1864. He was transferred to Camp Douglas, Ill., arriving Oct. 28, 1864. He took the Oath of Allegiance to the United States there and was released Feb. 3, 1865. He is described in the records as a resident of Scott Co., Ky., who was 5 feet 11 inches tall with a dark complexion, brown hair and black eyes.
Sanford Wigginton, who died in 1882, once rode with Quantrill's Raiders, shown here at their 1904 reunion
   The 1870 Mortality Schedule indicates Sanford’s first wife, Sarah Jane Calvert, perished of consumption (tuberculosis) in January 1870 at Stamping Ground, Scott Co., Ky. She died Jan. 11, 1870, was buried there with an inscribed tombstone in Lindsay Cemetery. Sarah and Sanford’s children are Joseph Sandford Wigginton, born circa 1862 and died in 1940, and William O. Wigginton, born circa 1867, and died Dec. 26, 1939, who both are buried in Stamping Ground Masonic Cemetery. Sanford “Wiggneton,” 30, widowed, head of the family, farmer, $1,200 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Stamping Ground P. O., Scott Co., Ky., with two children (Joseph [S.], 8; Wm. [O.], 3), and four others (Marriett Riddell, 26, farm laborer, male; Selly Riddell, 22, keeping house; Ann Riddell, 4; and Susan Riddell, 1), all born Kentucky (NARA Film M593:497:322A).
   After their marriage in 1871, Sanford and Josephine lived in Ghent, Ky., in 1880. “Josiphene Wigginton,” 43, housekeeper, and husband, Safford (Sanford) Wigginton, 45, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Ghent, Dist. 34, Carroll Co., Ky., with two children: Marry O. (O’Neal), 12, in school, stepdaughter (of Sanford), and George Get (Georgette) Wigginton, 6, daughter (of Sanford and Josephine) (NARA Film T9:408:411A). Also listed are two others, perhaps former slave and son (Maj. B. Wigginton, 22, male, black, servant, and his child, Joseph Wigginton, 1, black.) All were born in Kentucky. Josephine and Sanford’s child is Georgette Wigginton, born in 1874, who married Arthur Carter and had several children. Sanford died in 1882 and was buried in Ghent Masonic Cemetery, Carroll Co., Ky. Josephine later moved to Louisville, Jefferson Co., Ky., apparently by 1896, when she sent her family history query to her local newspaper, Courier-Journal, or by the following year: "Josephine Wigginton," widow of Sanford Wigginton, and daughter Georgette “Georgia” Wigginton are listed in the 1897 Caron’s Directory of the City of Louisville as residents living at 2355 Payne (p. 1185). Josephine Wigginton, widow of Sanford, and daughter “Georgia” Wigginton, who worked as a printer at Am. Printing House for the Blind, still lived at that residence in 1899 (p. 1187). Census data indicate Josephine also lived there in 1900 and 1910. "Josephine W. [Wigginton] Lindsay," 61, born in June 1838, widowed, mother of two living children, mother of Mary O. N. Evans, 32, born March 1868, no children, married eight years, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 3, Dist. 5, Louisville, Jefferson Co., Ky., living with head of the family, Mary’s husband, John L. Evans, 32, born September 1867, physician, rents home (NARA Film T623:529:134A). All three were born in Kentucky to parents born there. They lived on Broadway Street. (Also listed are two others, relationships unknown: Caroline S. Sewell, 58, born in February 1842 in Illinois to a mother born Illinois, father Kentucky, and John Allcorn, 19, born April 1881 in Kentucky to parents born there, black, servant.) "Josephine Wiggeton," 71, mother of two living children, head of the family, owner of a mortgage-free home on Frankfort Avenue, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Precinct 26, Louisville, Jefferson Co., Ky., with one grown child, Mary (O’Neal) Evans, 42, widowed, music teacher, both born Kentucky to parents born there (NARA Film T624:484:221B). Mary’s first husband, John L. Evans, died between 1900 and 1910, and she second married Maurice Willis. Mary and Maurice and Josephine moved back to Carroll Co., Ky., by 1920. "Josephine Wiggeton," 71, two living children, head, owner of a mortgage-free home on Frankfort Avenue, with one grown child, Mary (O’Neal) Evans, 42, widowed, music teacher, both Kentucky (NARA Film T624:484:221B). Mary’s first husband, John L. Evans, died between 1900 and 1910, and she second married Maurice Willis. Mary and Maurice and Josephine moved back to Carroll Co., Ky., by 1920. Josephine last appears in the census in 1920, about eight years before she died. "Josephine Wigginton," 82, born in Kentucky to parents born there, widowed, living alone, is listed in the 1920 U. S. Census for Ghent, Dist. 6, Carroll Co., Ky. (NARA Film T625:561:258A). She lived on Main Street next door to her daughter Mary and her second husband, Maurice Willis.
   John Jesse O’Neal, child of Josephine Lindsay and John Oliver O'Neal, was born Feb. 12, 1866, and died in 1866 in Scott Co., Ky.
Mary O’Neal Evans Willis
Tombstone of Mary O’Neal Evans Willis and Maurice Willis in the family plot,
Ghent Masonic Cemetery. Other family tombstones can be seen in the background.
   Mary O’Neal, child of Josephine Lindsay and John Oliver O'Neal, was born March 7, 1868. She died of bronchial pneumonia and hypertension on July 18, 1948, in Campbellsburg, Henry Co., Ky., and was buried two days later beside her second husband, Maurice Willis, in Ghent Masonic Cemetery. Her death certificate indicates she was a resident of Ghent, Carroll Co., Ky. She first married John L. Evans circa 1892. He was born circa 1867 in Kentucky and died between 1900-1910, most likely in Louisville, Jefferson Co., Ky., where they lived. Mary was a music teacher. She did not have children who survived.
   Georgette Wigginton, child of Josephine Lindsay O'Neal and Sanford Wigginton, was born circa 1874. She married Arthur Carter. He died in Moreland, Ky. Their children include Arthur Lee, George Wadding, Jessie, Son, Sara and Mary Dean Carter.

   Jesse William Lindsay, child of Eudocea “Docia” “Dotia” Baker Scruggs and Gen. Jesse Cole Lindsay, was born March 10, 1841, in Gallatin Co., Ky. He died in 1882 in Ghent, Carroll Co., Ky., and was buried there in Ghent Masonic Cemetery. “Jesse W. Lindsay,” 10, born Kentucky, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 1, Carroll Co., Ky., with parents, Eudocea, 52, and Jessee, 60, farmer, $8,000 real estate, and two siblings (Priscilla, 18; Josephine, 12) and one other (Jay Martin, 17, farmer), all born Kentucky (NARA Film M432:195:166A). Jesse William Lindsay served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States and survived the war. He enlisted as a private in Company F, Fourth Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, on Sept. 10, 1862, in New Liberty, Owen Co., Ky. (NARA Film M319 Roll 29). His NARA compiled military service records, which are incomplete, indicate he served until at least March 19, 1864. He married Virginia Ferguson “Jennie” Tompkins circa 1867. She was born in 1846 in Boone Co., Ky., the daughter of Mariam Brooking and John Fisher Tompkins. Virginia was educated at Georgetown College and was a longtime member of Ghent Christian Church. Virginia died Jan. 8, 1928, in Carroll Co., Ky., and was buried beside Jesse in Ghent Masonic Cemetery. “Jesse Wm. Lindsay,” 19, is listed in the 1860 U. S. Census for Ghent, Carroll Co., Ky., living with parents, Eudocia, 62, and Jesse, 69, and one sibling, Josephine Lindsay, 22, all born Kentucky (NARA Film M653:361:80). “Jesse W. Lindsay,” 29, farmer, $6,000 real estate, $600 personal estate, and wife, Jenny, 24, housekeeper, are listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Bramlette P. O., Dist. 1, Gallatin Co., Ky., with one child: Mariam, 2, all born Kentucky (NARA Film M593:462:290A). “Jessey Lindsay,” 39, farmer, and wife, Jinney, 34, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Ghent, Carroll Co., Ky., with three children: Marium (“Mamie”), 12; Jessey (Baker), 10; and (Priscilla) Puss, 6, all born Kentucky (NARA Film T9:408:410B). Jesse and Jenny’s children are Mariam “Mamie” Lindsay (1868-1890), who married James G. Goslee; Jesse Baker Lindsay (1870-?) who married Mary North; Priscilla “Puss” Lindsay (1874-1969), who married Dudley Peak Griffith; Lavenia Lindsay (1880-1953), who married James Howard Graham; and Margaret H. Lindsay (1883-1963), who married Frederick Stucy Sebree.
   William Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. 
Works Cited Josephine Lindsay O'Neal Wigginton
Dennis, Deborah G. "Mystery Solved: 'Mrs. J. W.' Josephine (Lindsay) O'Neal Wigginton." Callaway Family Association Newsletter.  Article published on CFANet: http://www.callawayfamily.org/cfanet/cfanet0213.htm.
--. The query letter in 1896 Louisville, Ky., Courier-Journal newspaper by great-granddaughter Josephine is the only source yet found that documents the maiden name of Sarah "Sallie" Bramlett, daughter of William I/Sr., and her marriage to Col. James Callaway.
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Chapter 6:
Generation 3
JAMES BRAMLETT and WINEFRED UNKNOWN BRAMLETT PAGE
(Children: Lucy? Bramlett)
James Bramlett served as a Soldier during the French & Indian War
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
James Bramlett, child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and First Wife Unknown, was born in or before 1723 in Colonial Virginia, most likely in Essex County. One official recorded document exists for James in 1744 in Caroline Co., Va., which allows us to calculate his estimated birth year: "James Bramlitt" was at least age 21 when he legally witnessed a deed from Edward Scrimshaw to Ephraim Simons in Caroline Co., Va., Court on June 8, 1744 (OB-1740-1746:281). John Carter and Richard Vawter also witnessed the document. James fought as a soldier in the Bedford County Militia during the French and Indian War in 1758, the year he died. He may have been suffering from injuries or illness incurred during his military service; he does state in his will he was “very sick & weak.” He may be buried in lost Bramblett Graveyard on the former Cedar Hill Plantation in Bedford. James wrote his will on July 14, 1758, in Bedford Co., Va. (DB-1:179). 
July the fourteenth one thousand seven Hundred & 58
In the Name of God Amen I James Bramlett of the Parish of Russell and County of Bedford being very sick & weak, but of Perfect senses and Understanding do make this my last will and Testament in the manner & form as follows first and Principally I commit my soul to God that gave it in sure Hopes of of a free Pardon for my sins and my Body I Commit to the Earth from Whence it was taken to be decently Buried at the Discretion of my Executor hereafter Mentioned & also my worldly estate I give & Dispose of it in the manner as followeth. Item I give and Bequeath to my sister Nancy Bramlet one Prime Heffer Marked with a crop & over Heel/Keel in each Ear. Item I give & Bequeath to my Loving wife Winefred Bramlet all & singular my whole Estate after Lawfull Debts are paid. Lastly I Constitute and Appoint my Loving wife Winefred Bramlet Whole & sole Executor of this my Last Will & Testatment In Witness Whereof I have set my Hand & seale the Day and Date first above Written.
Sign’d, Seal’d & Delivered} James Bramlett in the Presents of us Wm Callaway, Francis Callaway & John Adams
 The will was recorded by Benjamin Howard, Bedford County Clerk, on Nov. 27, 1858 (DB-1:187-188).
At a Court held for Bedford County Nov. 27th 1758 This will was Proved the the oaths of William Callaway, Francis Callaway & John Adams, Witnesses thereto & sworn to Winifred Bramlitt the Executrix therein Named and Ordered to be Recorded and on the Motion of the said Executrix who entered into & acknowledged a Bond with William Callaway & Francis Callaway her Securities in the Penalty of one Hundred Pounds according to Law. Certificate was granted her for Obtaining a Probate thereof in due form. Teste Benjamin Howard, C.B.C. (WB-1:187)
An inventory and appraisement of James's estate is dated Dec. 29, 1758 (WB-1:197-198). His wife, Winefred, and sister Nancy (Ann?) are named as his only heirs. Francis Callaway, Isaac Woodward and Charles Brat/Briot made “An Inventory of the Estate of Mr. James Bramlett Deceas’d” which was “appraised December 29th 1758.” The itemized list of furniture and household items, appraised at 69 pounds 3 shillings 7 pence, was returned to the court and recorded Jan. 22, 1759, in Bedford County:
1 Mear & Coalt, 1 Young Mear, 1 Old Horse, 1 Young do, 1 Cow & Calf, 2 do, 1 Heifer & the Yearlings, 10 Hoggs, one Bed & furniture, 1 do, 1 do, 1 large Leather Trunk, 1 Small do, 1 Chest, 1 Table & Chairs, 1 Looking Glass, 1 Sifter, 1 Bible & Prayer Book, 1 Pare of Money Scales & Pocket Book, 1 Silver Bockel & Paire of Harnes, 2 hides of Tand Leather, 2 Raw Hides, 1 Bocks Iron & Heters & fire Tongs, 1 Candlestick & Snuffers, 1 Gunn, 4 Bottles, 1 Teapot & Pech Bowl & Coffee Pott &tc, 2 Vials, 1 Wheel & four Paires of Cards, 1 pare of sheres, 1 Dozn Knives & forks, 1 parcel of Earthen Ware, 2 potts & Skillet & Ladle & flesh fork, 6 Pewter Plates & Gold, 3 Dishes, 5 Bacons, 15 Spoons, 1 Candle Mould &tc, set of Carpenter’s toolts, a Parcel of Old Iron Ware, a Parcel of Woden ware, 7 Bells, 3 locks, 1 saddal Bridle, 1 slay & Harnes, small tubs…. ( WB-1:197)
James may have farmed land on Tomahawk Creek adjacent to land owned by Francis Callaway and Capt. Lynche in Bedford County. Francis Callaway, a witness who provided security for James’s estate, transferred 150 acres on the creek to Winiford Page, most likely James Bramlett’s widow, and her (second?) husband, Robert Page, of Goochland Co., Va., for £15 in 1761 (DB-A-1:502-503). They later sold this land to James Bramlett’s brother Ambrose Bramlett on March 27, 1765 (DB-2:539). “Winiford Page” made her mark on the deed. When preparing to move to North Carolina, Ambrose sold the land a few years later to Andrew Thompson on May 24, 1768 (DB-3:149-50). Robert Page was one of the first justices appointed in Bedford County in 1754.
   No child was named in his will; however, James and Winefred may have had a child born after his death in 1758-1759: perhaps Lucy Bramlett. She may be the Lucy Bramblett who married Thomas Lumpkin in Bedford County in 1778. 
   Lucy Bramlett, perhaps child of James and Winefred Bramlett, may have been born circa 1758-1759 after her father died in Bedford Co., Va. Lucy Bramblett married Thomas Lumpkin in 1778 in Bedford County. He was born circa 1750-1759 and died after 1820, perhaps in Bedford County. Lucy may have died before 1798. Lucy and Thomas Lumpkin had a child named Sophia Lumpkin, born circa 1779-1782 and died pre-1817, who married Abraham Buford, son of Henry Buford and nephew of James Buford Sr. who married Elizabeth Bramblett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr.
 Sophia Lumpkin, child of Lucy Bramlett and Thomas Lumpkin, was born circa 1779-1782 and died pre-1817. She married Abraham Buford, son of Henry Buford and nephew of James Buford Sr. and Elizabeth Bramblett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr. Abraham was born Dec. 13, 1778. He died in 1845 in Bedford Co., Va. His will was probated Oct. 9, 1845.
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Chapter 7:
Generation 3
NANCY ANN BRAMLETT and (THOMAS LUMPKIN?)
(Marriage/Children unknown)
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Nancy Ann Bramlett, child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and First Wife Unknown, was born before 1732 in Colonial Virginia. She died sometime after being named as an heir in her brother James Bramlett's 1758 will. She may have been living with James and wife, Winefred, at the time because her mother had died and her stepmother, Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett, was deceased. Elizabeth is not mentioned in a deed of gift William I/Sr. wrote in 1759 to son-in-law Stephen White; so she died before that date. (If Elizabeth were still living at that time, William I/Sr. would have made arrangements for her as well.) Nancy Ann's nephew William Bramblett III, son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., signed/witnessed as surety for a marriage of Ann Bramlett and Thomas Lumpkin on Oct. 25, 1798, in Bedford County. Earlier, Thomas Lumpkin had married Lucy Bramblett, probably daughter of James and Winefred and the niece of Anna and Rev. William Jr., on March 4, 1778. Robert Alexander, then county clerk, signed the marriage bond as surety/witness. (Alexander probably was not a relative; county clerks commonly signed marriage records if relatives or friends were not available to act as witnesses for brides and grooms of legal age. Lucy's father, if he indeed was James Bramlett who died in 1758, was not available to witness her marriage bond.) (One theory suggests Lucy Bramlett, born circa 1758-1759, may be the only child of Winefred and James Bramblett, perhaps born after her father died in 1758 in Bedford County. No children are named in James's will, so Lucy would not have had a sibling to witness her marriage bond, either. (Winefred second married Robert Page, and they most likely reared Lucy.) No other information is yet available about Nancy Ann. Thomas Lumpkin, born circa 1750-1759, died circa 1820, probably in Bedford County.
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Chapter 8:
Generation 3
AMBROSE BRAMLETT and JANE “JEAN” “JANNY” WOODSON WHITE
(Children: Theodosia, Lydia, Jesse H., William, Stephen H., John, Lunsford Meredith, Sarah, Mary Ann, Elizabeth)
Col. Ambrose Bramlett served as an officer during the French & Indian War & American Revolution
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
COL. AMBROSE BRAMLETT, child of Elizabeth Callaway and William Bramlett I/Sr., was born after 1732, perhaps in or by 1736, in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. He died in Wilkes Co., Ga., in late February/early March 1804. He wrote his will on Nov. 13, 1803, and it was proved March 5, 1804, in Wilkes County. He married Jane "Jean" "Janny" Woodson on Nov. 28, 1768, in Pittsylvania Co., Va. Janny was born circa 1745 in Cumberland or Henrico Co., Va., the daughter of Elizabeth Hughes and Sanburne Woodson. Adam Loving provided surety and John Burch and Charity Burch witnessed the marriage bond. Janny is stepdaughter of Charity Childress, second wife of Sanburne Woodson, and John Burch, second husband of Charity Childress. (The Burches married in 1756 in Cumberland Co., Va.) Janny died after 1818, most likely after 1818 in Days Bend, Autauga Co., Ala. Janny and Ambrose moved to Surry Co., N. C., and later settled in Wilkes Co., Ga. After Ambrose died, Janny married Jesse White circa 1809, probably Wilkes Co., Ga., and moved to Autauga Co., Ala. Jesse was probably born in the 1740s or 1750s. He died after 1809-1810 in Putnam Co., Ala., or after 1817 in Autauga Co., Ala. He may be buried there with Janny.
Ambrose Bramlette's Will and Estate

Ambrose's Life in Colonial Virginia
   William Waller Hening’s Statutes at Large, which notes September 1758 payments “To the Militia of the County of Bedford, and provisions furnished by sundry inhabitants of the said county” during the French & Indian War, indicates “Ambrose Bramlett, Serjeant” received £2, 17s, 4p; and “Ambrose Bramlett, Ensign” received £7, 18s. Also “Amhus Bramlett” received 8 shillings, perhaps for provisions given as a “sundry inhabitant” since no military rank is attached to his name. All three entries may be for the same Ambrose. The name “Amhus” is most likely merely a variant spelling or an abbreviated or quickly written form of Ambrose. No other record of an “Amhus” has surfaced. “William Bramlitt” (most likely Jr. and less likely William I/Sr. because of the latter’s advanced age, 60s in 1758) and “James Bromlet” (died in 1758) also received payments for military service in the Bedford Militia during the French & Indian War. Ambrose also served as a colonel in the North Carolina Militia during the American Revolution. His daughter Theodosia's obituary indicates the family was held by Lord Cornwallis and troops who used their plantation as headquarters during the war.
   Ambrose and Janny's children are Theodosia, Lydia, Jesse Hughes, William, Sarah (“Sally”), Lunsford Meredith, John, Elizabeth (“Eliza”), Stephen Hughes and Mary Ann Bramlette.
Netherland's Mingo Tavern, Nicholasville, Ky., 1793, in A History of Jessamine County

Theodosia Bramlette, adopted child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born Aug. 10, 1766, in Salisbury, Rowan Co., N. C. Her obituary indicates she "lost her parents at an early age." She died Oct. 20, 1853, in Nicholasville, Jessamine Co., Ky., and was buried in lost Netherland Cemetery.
   
Tombstones of Benjamin Netherland and Theodosia Bramlett in Nicholasville, Ky.
Below: Old Jessamine County Jail, the site of Netherlands' former Mingo Tavern

  
   Theodosia married Benjamin Netherland in early 1787 in Surry Co., N. C. Benjamin was born Feb. 29, 1755, in Powhatan Co., Va., the son of Mary Ann Mosby and Capt. John Netherland. Benjamin died Oct. 10, 1838, in Jessamine County, and was buried with military honors in Netherland Cemetery, the garden graveyard of his residence. His grave and others in the cemetery were desecrated when the property was sold to a developer who cleared the residence and garden for construction of a new commercial building. Neighbors were able to save Theodosia's tombstone, which was later installed in the yard of the old county jail, the site of the Netherlands' former home and business at 200 South Main, Nicholasville, Ky. The Netherlands owned and operated Mingo Tavern and were in charge of the local post office at Nicholasville. They also bred race horses and farmed.
Lieut. Benjamin Netherland served as an Officer during the American Revolution
   Both Theodosia and Benjamin experienced the Revolution first hand. She was still at home, unmarried, with her family and he was serving as an American officer in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Kentucky. One of Benjamin’s descendants, Capt. John William Thompkins, summarized his military service for an SAR application:
At the outbreak of the revolutionary war Benjamin was in Cuba on a trading voyage, here he learned that Sir Peter Parker was to make an attack on Charleston, South Carolina. He then filled his boat with Cuban goods, ran the blockade, and helped to defend Fort Moultrie against the British assault. He accomp[an]ied General La Fayette on his journey from Charleston in 1777 so far as Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. He remained in Charlotte, North Carolina until 1781, took part in the battle of G[uil]ford Courthouse, and shortly after drifted into Kentucky. In Kentucky he took part in nearly all Indian battles from 1781 to 1784, was the hero of the battle of Blue Licks. He went with George Rogers Clark on one of his expeditions to punish the Indians, Lieutenant Netherland (at this date) was a member of company commanded by Captain Harbisham, of the regiment commanded by Colonel Harris of the Georgia Line, for two years from 1776.
After the war in 1793 one Benjamin Netherland served as a volunteer soldier with the rank of private in a company of mounted infantry militia in the First Battalion, Second Regiment, First Brigade, Third Division, state of Georgia, for 17 days in the service of the United States (NARA Film M905 Roll 7). His NARA Compiled Military Service Records indicate he was called into service May 30, 1793, and was discharged June 15, 1793.
   Benjamin applied for a pension based on his military service at age 74 on Feb. 7, 1829. Theodosia applied for and received a widow's pension, W.8487, on June 19, 1845.

   Benjamin is featured in Bennett H. Young's History of Jessamine County, Kentucky From Its Earliest Settlement to 1898:
One of the most unique and extraordinary characters in the history of Jessamine county in its early days was Maj. Benjamin Netherland. He was born in Powhatan county, Virginia, in 1755. He went to Cuba as the agent of his father, to dispose of his tobacco crop. There learning that Sir Peter Parker was to make an attack on Charleston, he left his cargo and ran the blockade into Charleston and helped to defend Fort Moultrie against British assault. He accompanied LaFayette on his journey from Charleston in 1777 as far as Mecklenburg county, North Carolina, when the distinguished Frenchman was on his way to Philadelphia to tender his services to Washington in behalf of American liberty.
   He remained at Charlotte, North Carolina until 1781, took part in the battle of Guilford Courthouse, and shortly after this he drifted into Kentucky. In May, 1782, he was at Estill station, and was with the Kentucky troops in the Estill defeat. He took part in nearly all the Indian' battles from 1781 to 1784. He went with George Rogers Clark on his expedition in 1782 to punish the Indians for the wrongs of Blue Licks.
   He was with General Harmar in his defeat, and with General Wayne in his victory at Fallen Timbers in 1794 and was instrumental in punishing the men who had perpetrated the slaughter at Blue Licks. After seven years' absence in Kentucky, he returned to North Carolina in 1788 and married his boyish sweetheart, Miss Theodosia Bramlette, who was a daughter of the distinguished Revolutionary fighter Col. Bramlette. He had lived in Fayette and Madison counties prior to his coming to Jessamine.
   After his marriage he settled on a farm five miles east of Nicholasville, and in 1793 he removed to where Nicholasville now stands, and built a hotel and called it Mingo Tavern — this house he kept until his death in 1838. The house was torn down in 1864.
   He was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Nicholasville, and was prominent in its early history, and his children were the first white people born within its limits. He was the real hero of the battle of Blue Licks. Robert Wickliffe, of Lexington, whose second wife was the only daughter of Col. Todd, who was in command at the battle at Blue Licks, in a political speech in 1848 in Nicholasville said that the majority of men who escaped at Blue Licks owed their preservation to Benjamin Netherland and that Netherland was a fearless man, fruitful in resources and of magnificent courage.
   Major Netherland always retained his old-time dress. He wore a cut-a-way coat, short breeches with knee buckles, and low shoes with silk lacers and silver buckles. His pants were always fastened with red bands, and his long queue was tied with a red ribbon.
   From his entrance into Nicholasville early in 1791 for forty years he was prominent as a leader in all its affairs. He was postmaster for about twenty-three years and always dispensed the village hospitality with a lavish hand. Every man who had fought in the Revolutionary war or in the Indian wars either in Kentucky or in the Northwest, was his friend, and none ever went from his door hungry or uncared for.
   Major Netherland's experience in the battle of the Blue Licks, justified him in his subsequent love of horses. He bred a great many fine race horses in his day, and in a letter written by him to Gen. John McCalla, in 1830, now in my possession, he begs him to come to Nicholasville on the following Sunday to dine with him and promises to show him "the damndest best three colts in the world."
   Major Netherland died October 10, 1838, and was buried in his garden, which is now the lot on which the county jail is built. Mr. Jos. Wallace, a remote kinsman, has, with most commendable love and liberality and true spirit of kinship, erected a headstone over the grave of Major Netherland and that of his wife, who, in 1851, was laid beside her husband. At his death Major Netheriand was accorded a magnificent military funeral. The funeral sermon was preached by Bishop Kavanaugh, who was then the Presiding Elder of the district. Gen. Leslie Combs, Maj. D. B. Price, Gen. John McCalla and Robert Wickliffe were his pall-bearers, and all the leading military companies of the county turned out to do his memory honor. (Louisville: Courier-Journal, 1898, pp. 15-23)

   Theodosia and Benjamin's children are John, Mary Ann, Powhatan, Betsy Ann, Catherine, Shelby, Daughter and Benjamin Netherland Jr.
   John Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born circa 1787 in Kentucky.
   Mary Ann Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born circa 1788 in Surry Co., N. C. She died in 1810 in Kentucky. She married Joel Moss Prewitt. Their child is Benjamin Mosby Prewitt.
   Powhatan Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born circa 1789 in Kentucky.
   Betsy Ann Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born circa 1790 in Jessamine Co., Ky. She married Robert Peace McMurty.
   Catherine Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born in Kentucky.
   Shelby Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born in Kentucky.
   Daughter Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born in Kentucky. She married Isaac Bourne.
   Benjamin Netherland Jr., child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born in Kentucky.

   Lydia Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C.
   Jesse Hughes Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C.
   William Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C.
   Sarah “Sally” Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C., or Wilkes Co., Ga.
   Judge Lunsford Meredith Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C., or Wilkes Co., Ga. He died in 1867 in Pulaski, Giles Co., Tenn., and was buried there in Maplewood Cemetery. He left a Will that was probated Sept. 7, 1867. The will specifically provides for his children, who are all daughters, to bequeath assets "free from the control" of husbands in order "to secure them from want and poverty." Heirs: wife, Mary; daughter Josephine Perkins and her children, Constantine and Bramlett Perkins; unmarried Daughters, including Anna B. Bramlett (defendant in the following court case); and  Lunsford's sister Elizabeth Mitchell.
   Lunsford moved from Wilkes Co., Ga., to Tennessee in 1813. He first married Sarah Slater on June 29, 1815, in Williamson Co., Tenn. She was born Feb. 25, 1799. She died June 15, 1841, and was buried in Maplewood Cemetery. His children are Josephine, Frances P. ("Fannie"), Mary L., Anna Bland, Eliza Jane and Adelaide W. Bramlett. Lunsford second married Mary Crockett on Sept. 14, 1848. She was born circa 1829 in North Carolina, the daughter of Frances Bland Dudley and Samuel Crockett. She died circa 1888. After Lunsford's death she married Charles Nathan Ordway.
Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, Giles County Wills, Inventories, Settlements, Vol. B-C, 1869-1917, pp. 180-183
January 1872 Term Giles County Court -- Regarding Lunsford Meredith Bramlett's Will
Charles N. Ordway & Others vs. Anna B. Bramlett & Others
The following four-page document is from a court case brought by Lunsford's widow, Mary Crockett Bramlett Ordway and her second husband, Charles N. Ordway, seeking judgment against one of Lunsford's children, Anna B. Bramlett, and others. The text of Lunsford's 1867 will, which had been lost or destroyed, was entered into the record of the court proceedings, apparently in an effort to settle/distribute part of the estate to the designated heirs.

[Transcript of Lunsford M. Bramlett Will]

   Hon. Lunsford M. Bramlett was the presiding chancellor when the Chancery Court of Wilson Co., Tenn., convened for the first time on July 25, 1836, at the court house in Lebanon. The court had been created during that year.
   Lunsford is featured in Sketches of the Bench and Bar of Tennessee:
Among the Tennesseans of former times who were once prominent, who performed valuable public service, and whose names are all but unknown to the present generation, is Lunsford M. Bramlett. He was, like many others whose names belong to our history, a native of North Carolina. He was born in Surry County, but exactly when, it is impossible to say. Conflicting accounts of the descent of his father are given, some saying that he was of English origin, and others that he was of Huguenot or Scotch-Irish stock. It is certain that his mother was of the Virginia family of Taylors, and was remotely akin to Zachary Taylor. The future Chancellor probably was born in the last decade of the last century. It appears that soon after his birth the family went to Wilkes County, Georgia, where he was reared. In 1813 he came to Tennessee, and on March 7, 1814, was admitted to the bar at Pulaski. He was a diligent and persevering student of the law, zealous on behalf of his clients and more than ordinarily prone to enter into their feelings. That he was a successful lawyer, and was esteemed by the public and by the profession, is proved by his elevation to the bench at a time when judicial office was carefully bestowed. He became Chancellor in 1836, and served until 1844, He died in 1854. After retiring from the bench he endured the hard fortune that waits on retired Judges, and was unable to regain his practice. In his life he was devoted to the law, and after his death the settlement of his estate seems to have occupied surviving members of the profession for some time. As Chancellor he was distinguished not for brilliancy or readiness of decision, bur for careful and conscientious investigation, and an earnest desire to be just. At the bar he was not an eloquent speaker, but a painstaking and zealous advocate, who by fair means made the best of every case. This is the record, not of a great man, but of an excellent and worthy one, a good lawyer, and a competent and upright Judge. (201)
Works Cited For Lunsford Meredith Bramlett
Caldwell, Joshua William. “Lunsford M. Bramlett." Sketches of the Bench and Bar of Tennessee. Knoxville, Tenn.: Ogden Brothers & Company, 1898.

Ordway, Charles N. and Anna B. Bramlett. “Lunsford M. Bramlett Court Case 1872.” Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, Giles County Wills, Inventories, Settlements. Vol. B-C, 1869-1917, pp. 180-183.
   Eliza Jane Bramlett, child of Sarah Slater and Lunsford Meredith Bramlett, was born in Tennessee. She died May 26, 1852, in Memphis, Shelby Co., Tenn., and was buried in an area that later became an elaborate vault in the Chapel Hill section of Elmwood Cemetery, established by her husband and others in 1853. She married Davidson M. Leatherman circa 1846-1848. He was born Dec. 13, 1813, in Rowan Co., N. C., the son of M. Nancy Partee and Daniel Leatherman, and moved to Giles Co., Tenn., where he met and married Eliza. He died July 25, 1873, at Raleigh Springs, Shelby Co., Tenn., and was buried beside Eliza in Elmwood Cemetery. His obituary in the July 29, 1873, edition of Nashville Union and American indicates "...he married a daughter of Judge Bramlette of this state" who died a few years after the family moved to Memphis and that Davidson Leatherman buried her in a "then unoccupied spot which, under his direction and management was laid off and converted into a beautiful burial ground near this city known as Elmwood Cemetery." He was a founder and first president of the cemetery. Davidson was a lawyer and Tennessee Attorney General for about four years and prominent citizen of Memphis. Davidson and Eliza's known child is Lunsford Leatherman, born circa 1848 in Tennessee. He died sometime after 1879-1880.




 Eliza Jane Bramlett and Davidson M. Leatherman Family Vault at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, courtesy Mary Pepin Moran
Above Left plaque: "Davidson M. Leatherman 1813-1873 A Founder of Elmwood Cemetery. Elected As Its First President Oct. 9, 1872. This Lot, Number One, Was The First To Be Purchased In The Chapel Hill Section." Above Right: Eliza Jane Bramlett Leatherman's marker is attached to the exterior, opposite side of the vault, shown below.
Eliza Jane Bramlett and Davidson M. Leatherman Vault, courtesy Mary Pepin Moran

   Adelaide W. Bramlett, child of Sarah Slater and Lunsford Meredith Bramlett, was born July 28, 1819, in Tennessee. She died Aug. 18, 1842, and was buried in Maplewood Cemetery. She married Andrew Franklin Goff on July 29, 1834, in Giles County. He was born in 1809 in Tennessee, the son of Izabella Miller McEwen and John Goff. He died Dec. 9, 1874, and was buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashvlle. Adelaide's tombstone inscription: "Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Adelaide W., Consort of A. E. Goff and Daughter of L. M. and Sarah S. Bramlett. Born 28th July 1891, and Departed This Life 18th August 1842." Andrew was a major in the First Tennessee Mounted Militia during the Second Seminole War. He second married Rebecca Jane Erwin on July 1, 1843, in Davidson Co., Tenn.


   Josephine Bramlett, child of Sarah Slater and Lunsford Meredith Bramlett, was born June 7, 1826, in Pulaski, Giles Co., Tenn. She died Nov. 9, 1876, in Birmingham, Ala., and was buried in Elyton Cemetery.. She married Constantine Hume Perkins. He was born in 1823 in Alabama, the son of Eliza Mildred Field and Constantine Perkins Sr. Constantine Jr. died there circa 1868. Their children are Bramlett, Constantine Jr., Eliza Jane, Virginia, Anne Elizabeth, Thomas W. and Josephine Bramlett Perkins.
   Anna B. Bramlett, child of Lunsford Meredith Bramlett, was born in Tennessee. She died in Florida. She married a man named Bright.


   John Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C., or Wilkes Co., Ga.

   Elizabeth “Eliza” Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C., or Wilkes Co., Ga. She died after 1867. She married a man named Mitchell. She was named as an heir and lived with her brother Lunsford in Pulaski, Tenn., before his death in 1867.
   Stephen Hughes Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C.
   Mary Ann Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C., or Wilkes Co., Ga.

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Chapter 9:
Generation 3
AGATHA AGGY BRAMLETT and STEPHEN WHITE
(Children: Ambrose, Sarah, William, James, Thomas, Stephen Jr., Susannah, Jesse, Tabia)
Stephen White and Sons served as Soldiers during the American Revolution
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Heartfelt Thanks to Descendants Mary L. Mortimeyer and Frances H. Revesz for providing much of the following about Agatha.
Agatha “Aggy” Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Callaway and William Bramlett I/Sr., probably was born after 1732 in Caroline Co., Va. She died circa 1812-1820 in Adair Co., Ky., and was buried there in White Cemetery. Her tombstone was missing in 1981. She is variously named in different Virginia and Kentucky records as Agatha, Agness, Agge and Aggy. She married Stephen White circa 1752 in Caroline Co., Va. He was born in 1728, possibly in Caroline Co., Va., the son of Susannah Quarles and Thomas White Sr. His parents owned and operated an ordinary in Caroline County. Thomas White (father of Stephen) and “William Bramlit” (father of Agatha) and others served on a jury in Caroline Co., Va., on Nov. 8, 1733, when “John Taliaferro Gent., late Sheriff of this county,” sued Roger Quarles, Thomas Carr Jr., and Richard Maulden for “an action of debt” (OB-1732-1740:108). After Stephen's father died, his mother applied to the county court for the ordinary license so she could operate the business. After their marriage Stephen and Agatha lived in Bedford Co., Va., perhaps moving there circa 1752 when the area was still Lunenburg. They definitely were living in Bedford County before 1759 when Agatha’s father, William Bramlett I/Sr., transferred some property to Stephen in a recorded deed of gift. Thirty years later, circa 1791, the Whites relocated to Fayette Co., Ky., and settled in what is now Adair Co., Ky. Stephen died there at the distinctive age of 102 on Oct. 30, 1830, at the home of his son Thomas White, and was buried there beside Agatha in White Cemetery.
Stephen White’s tombstone: "Born in Virginia & died Oct. 30th 1830, Aged 102 years."
Rubbing of Stephen White’s tombstone shows the wheat/grain design in greater detail, courtesy Mortimeyer and Revesz
The owner of the White farm in 1860, Oscar Pile, donated the cemetery to the White family in a deed recorded in Adair Co., Ky.:
Whereas there is Situated on my farm a Grave Yard & burying ground and whereas it is desired that said grave yard should be held & used only as a burying ground Now for good and valuable consideration I hereby donate & forever set apart said burying ground to be used alone for burying purposes and hereby donate the following parcel of land for that purpose (viz) Beginning at the north corner of said Grave Yard running thence South 110 feet Thence West 40 feet Thence N 110 feet Thence East 40 feet to the beginning. I hereby donate to said White family said Grave Yard for burying purposes & to all other persons to be used & occupied only as a burying ground. Witness my hand this 25th day of April 1860 - Oscar Pile. (DB-R:411)
Mortimeyer and Revesz, authors in 1992 of White Families - John and Stephen of Virginia and Kentucky, who visited the cemetery in 1981, reported cattle roaming free through the pasture where the burial ground is located. Stephen’s tombstone was in good condition at that time, they write; but Agatha’s had disappeared and many others were broken (207). The residence was known as the Estil Ballou farm.
Agatha and Stephen’s Life in Virginia
   Stephen “Might have been apprenticed to a blacksmith as a youth,” according to historian William S. Simpson Jr. in Virginia Baptist Ministers 1760-1790: A Biographical Survey (1999, Vol. III:141). When grown Stephen was a planter and slaveowner, surveyor and Separate Baptist lay minister. No evidence of ordination has been found.
Agatha and Stephen’s Life in Kentucky

End Notes For Agatha and Stephen


1 Thomas White Sr., father of Stephen, was born circa 1700-1710, the son of Elizabeth and Samuel White and grandson of Jane and Robert White, all of England. Thomas Sr. is named in several records in Caroline County during 1725-1740s. He died in or before 1750 when his wife applied for the renewal of his ordinary’s license. She was licensed to operate White’s (Burk’s) Shop until at least 1759. Mortimeyer and Revesz list several possible siblings of Stephen in their 1992 history: Jane, Ursula, Ann, William, James, Thomas White Jr., who all were born between circa 1724 and 1738.

2 In past years, family tradition held that Stephen descends from or is related to Pilgrim William White, a laborer who came to America from England or Ireland on the Mayflower, landing at Plymouth Rock, Mass., in 1607, and his son William White Jr. Some believe Stephen may be related to John White, the first governor of Virginia. There appear to be separate White families in different areas of colonial America who may not be fully researched and may or may not be closely or distantly related to each other. One is the family of Henry White of Buckingham and Bedford counties in Virginia, whose descendant Jacob White married one of Elizabeth Bramlett Buford’s granddaughters, mentioned below. Also, Stephen may or may not be related to Aquilla White who was involved in the unfortunate shooting death of Agatha’s brother Rev. William Bramblett Jr. and perhaps one or two others in 1779 on the Kentucky Frontier. Aquilla, born circa 1745 in Maryland, reportedly descends from Elizabeth and John White and ancestors from England. After the shooting incident in Kentucky, Aquilla returned to his home in Pennsylvania for his family. They were in Fayette County in 1780-1781 and settled on nearly 3,000 acres in present-day Montgomery Co., Ky. Aquilla married Susannah Noland. He was a constable and planter who applied for his Revolutionary War pension in 1811. He died in 1823 at Red River, Montgomery Co., Ky.
   Agatha and Stephen's children are Ambrose, Sarah, William, James, Thomas, Stephen Jr., Susannah, Jesse and Tabia White.
   Ambrose White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1753-1756 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha's brother Ambrose Bramlett. He died May 4, 1839, in Franklin Co., Ky. He first married a woman named Elizabeth in Bedford County. They had three children: Mary, Charlotte, Elizabeth White. He married Cynthia Green in 1822 in Franklin Co., Ky.
   Sarah White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1757-1758 in Bedford Co., Va. She is a namesake of Agatha's sister Sarah "Sallie" Bramlett Callaway Brown. She died in 1814 in Adair Co., Ky. She first married John Field in Bedford Co., Va. John wrote his will on April 15, 1778, in Bedford County, naming wife, Sarah, and two children: Thomas and John. It was probated July 27, 1778. Sarah and her father, Stephen White, were named executors. James White and Edmund Fair witnessed the will (WB-1:305). John and Sarah's children include Thomas, John, Mildred, Sarah, Ackeberry, Clementina Field. Sarah second married William Hurt. Their children include William W., Susannah, James, Alban, Susan Hurt.
   William White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1759-1760 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha's father William Bramlett I/Sr. and Stephen's brother William White. He died in 1814 in Franklin Co., Ky. He first married a woman named Church. He second married Nancy Gale. He third married Ann Lewis. His children include Judy, John S., Mary C., Robert T./L., Permelia B., James G., Susan C., William, Catherine, Sophia Jane, Elizabeth Ann, Agatha L. M. White.
  James White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1761 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha's brother James Bramlett and Stephen's brother James White. He died in 1828 in Bedford County. He married Lucy Terry there on March 6, 1783. Lucy, daughter of Thomas Terry, and James applied for their marriage bond on Feb. 13, 1783, in Bedford County. John Mead signed the  document as surety. Rev. Nathaniel Shrewsbury, father of Milley Shrewsbury, wife of James Bramlette Sr., performed their marriage ceremony. James and Lucy’s children include Jeremiah, Thomas F., Stephen, Mary, Crawford Enoch, Frances B. White.
   Mary White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married William Lowry in 1821 in Bedford Co., Va. They applied for their marriage bond on Jan. 30, 1821. "Enock C. White" (Crawford E., brother of Mary) signed the document as surety.
   Crawford Enoch White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married Elizabeth W. Martin, daughter of George Martin, on Jan. 23, 1827, in Bedford Co., Va. They applied for their marriage bond on Jan. 22, 1827. Abner Martin signed as surety. Frederick Kabler performed their marriage ceremony.
   Frances B. White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married Julius H. Hatcher, on Feb. 24, 1829, in Bedford Co., Va. She married Julius H. Hatcher there on Feb. 24, 1829. They applied for their marriage bond on Feb. 23, 1829. Crawford E. White, brother of Frances, signed as surety. William Harris performed their marriage ceremony.
   Thomas White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1762-1763 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Stephen's father Thomas White Sr. He died in 1844 in Adair Co., Ky. He first married Jane Lusk on March 23, 1783, in Bedford County. They applied for their marriage bond on March 18, 1783. Araba Brown signed as surety. William Johnson performed their marriage ceremony. Thomas White’s second wife is Elizabeth, surname unknown. Thomas had at least nine children: Jabin, Javan, Thomas, Lucinda L., James B., Cynthia, Edmund F., Ambrose, Stephen White.
   Stephen  White Jr., child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1764-1765 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of his father, Stephen White Sr. He died in 1820 in Fayette Co., Ky. He first married Polly Rushton in 1785 in Bedford County. His second wife is Theodosia White. His children include Stephen III, James, Theodosia, John C., Ambrose, Rowland, Thomas C. White.
   Susannah White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1766-1768 in Bedford Co., Va. She died circa 1844 in Howard Co., Mo. She married James Callaway on July 13, 1784, in Bedford County. They applied for their marriage bond on July 12, 1784. Lance Woodward signed as surety. William Johnson performed their marriage ceremony. James and Susannah's eleven children: Charles, Stephen, Agatha, John, Anna, Ambrose, Betsy, Sally, James, Flanders, Signea Callaway.
   Jesse White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1769-1770 in Bedford Co., Va. He died circa 1836 in Adair Co., Ky. He married Frances White. She also died in Adair County. His children include William, Mildred, Janetta, Sanford, Dudley, Harmon B. White.
   Tabia “Taby” White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1771-1773 in Bedford Co., Va. She died sometime after 1790 in Adair Co., Ky. a married Robert Rowland on Aug. 12, 1790, in Bedford County. Stephen White, father of “Taby,” gave consent on the marriage bond, dated Aug. 9, 1790. William Leftwich Jr. signed as surety. Rev. Nathaniel Shrewsbury performed their marriage ceremony. Robert Rowland is the son of Penelope Clark and Henry Rowland. (Henry left a will in Bedford County witnessed in 1773 by Joshua Early. Penelope is the daughter of Judith Adams and Micajah Clark of Albemarle Co.,Va.) Tabia and Robert moved to Adair Co., Ky., shortly after they married. Robert Rowland signed two bonds as security when his brother-in-law Jesse White executed and re-secured his bond as constable of Adair County on Feb. 1, 1808 (CB-B:57) and on Feb. 5, 1810 (CB-B:175).

  
Whites, courtesy Patti Imani
Works Cited Agatha “Aggy” Bramlett White
Imani, Patti. Photographs of Mary J. Waggener and Stephen White and son Frank White and wife, Nancy, and Susie and Jessie W. Martin. 30 September 2000. 2837 28th Ave.. NW, Olympia, WA 98502.

Mortimeyer, Mary L. and Frances H. Revesz. White Families - John and Stephen of Virginia and Kentucky. 1992. Permission to quote all material obtained from the late Mary Mortimeyer.
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Chapter 10:
Generation 3
ELIZABETH BRAMLETT and JAMES BUFORD
(Children: John, William, James Jr., Simeon K., Abraham, Ambrose, Henry, Judith, Elizabeth, Frances)
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Capt. James Buford served as an Officer during the American Revolution
Elizabeth Bramlett, child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Elizabeth Callaway, was born circa 1745 in Colonial Virginia. She died in 1798 in Scott Co., Ky. She married James Buford Sr., son of Judith Early and John Buford, on July 14, 1761, in Bedford Co., Va. James was born in 1740 in Bromfield Parish, Culpeper Co., Va. He died in 1792-1799 in Scott Co., Ky. Both James and Elizabeth were early residents of Liberty, now Bedford, Bedford Co., Va. Elizabeth moved there with her family in 1752. James was living there by 1761. He helped lay out the town of Liberty and served as a presiding magistrate. He recorded a deed as a trustee of Bedford in 1786. James Sr. served as captain of a company in the Virginia State Militia. On March 22, 1777, "Captain James Buford was allowed pay, rations, &tc., for his company to the 15th instant, £997 1s. 9d." James Sr. appointed his son James Jr. as his attorney for business in Virginia, and moved with the rest of his family to Kentucky, according to Mortimeyer and Revesz (331). They cite Mildred Buford Minter's 1924 history Buford Family in America for names of the children. James Sr. and Elizabeth's children, born in Bedford, Va., include John, William, James Jr., Simeon K., Abraham, Ambrose, Henry, Judith, Elizabeth and Frances Buford.
   John Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born circa 1764 in Bedford Co., Va. He died in Kentucky. He married Frances Turpin Benton. John moved to Lincoln (later Garrard) Co., Ky.
   William Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born circa 1768 in Bedford Co., Va. He died circa 1794 in Kentucky, perhaps Crab Orchard. He married Martha Hill Logwood, daughter of Ann Aiken and Thomas Logwood, on Oct. 11, 1783, in Bedford County. She was born circa 1766 in Virginia. She died in 1808 in Bedford, Va. After William Buford died, Martha second married Stephen Hubbard. They had five children: Nancy, Thomas, William, Edmund, Margaret Hubbard. William and Martha's children are Matilda, Lucinda, Parthenia, Parmelia Buford.
   Matilda Buford, child of William and Martha Hill (Logwood) Buford, was born in 1793 in Bedford Co., Va., and died in 1876. She married Jacob Washington White in 1812 in Bedford County. Matilda's guardian, grandfather Thomas Logwood, gave consent for the marriage. Jacob was born circa 1792, the son of Hannah Spiers and Capt. Jacob White, a Revolutionary War veteran. Jacob died in 1829. Matilda and Jacob's children are Celine Catherine, William Allen, Adeline Martha, John Henry, Sarah Frances, Virginia Ann, Parmelia Elizabeth, Mary Starr and Hillary Alexander White. Matilda second married William Thaxton, born 1782 and died 1839.
   Celine Catherine White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born Oct. 18, 1813, in Bedford Co., Va. She died there circa 1853. She married Fountain Melvin Hawkins. He was born 1811 and died 1865. Their children are Matilda, Fannie Lewis, Harvey, Martha, John Henry, Mary Elizabeth, Edward C., Sallie, Spotswood B. Hawkins.
   William Allen White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.
   Adeline Martha White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.
   John Henry White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.
   Sarah Frances White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va. 

  Virginia Ann White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born July 20, 1820, in Bedford Co., Va. She died April 9, 1877, and was buried in Jeter Cemetery, Union, Bedford Co., Va. She married Fielding Harris Jeter circa 1836. He was born Dec. 29, 1810, and died May 2, 1894. He also rests in Jeter Cemetery. Their children include Jacob W., Finley W., Matilda F., Lucy E., Tilman Buford and Thomas Alexander Jeter.
   Thomas Alexander "Pomp" Jeter, child of Virginia Ann White and Fielding Harris Jeter, was born July 16, 1841, in Bedford Co., Va. He died May 16, 1885, and was buried in Beaver Dam Baptist Church Cemetery. He married Lauria Cornelia Mays on Oct. 16, 1872. She was born Feb. 2, 1851, the daughter of Malinda Wright and Joseph W. Mays. Lauria died in early 1876. Their children are Laura E. M. Jeter Davidson, born 1875 and died 1958, and Lula Eastman Jeter.
   Lula Eastman Jeter, child of Laura Cornelia Mays and Thomas Alexander "Pomp" Jeter, was born in 1873 near Chamblissburg in Bedford Co., Va. She died in 1954. She lived with her maternal grandparents after her mother died and then with her father for a year in Liberty, Va., until he died in 1885. Lula married in 1903 George Pleasant Parker, a hardware merchant. He was born in 1863, the son of Rebecca Louise Fitzhugh Walker and Robert William Parker. George died in 1939. He and Lula are both buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Bedford, Va. They had four children: Georgette, Laura Jeter, Virginia Hamilton and Josephine Mays Parker. Lula, a genealogist, historian and author, co-wrote with her White cousin Mary Denham Ackerly Our Kin: The Genealogies of Some of the Early Families Who Made History in the Founding and Development of Bedford County, Virginia, which was published by J. P. Bell, Lynchburg, Va., in 1930, and co-authored and published with Peter Viemeister Parker's Bedford County, Virginia, History in Bedford, Va., in 1938. The latter was reprinted in 1954 by Bedford Democrat. Lula also contributed to a compilation naming Bedford County World War II veterans. She was an active member of Peaks of Otter Daughters of the American Revolution and a graduate of Belmont Seminary and Hollins Institute.
   Parmelia Elizabeth White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.
   Mary Starr White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.
   Hillary Alexander White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.


   James Buford Jr., child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va.

   Simeon K. Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. He first married Mary Barr. He second married Ann Mary Sieher
   Abraham Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born April 13, 1772, in Bedford Co., Va. He died Oct. 3, 1840. He married Mary Moody. She was born 1777 and died 1853. Abraham moved to Bourbon Co., Ky., and Missouri.
   Ambrose Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. He married Nancy Kirtley, daughter of Elizabeth and Francis Kirtley of Orange Co., Va. Ambrose moved to Kentucky and to Missouri in 1827.
   Henry Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va.
   Judith Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. She married Thomas Scruggs on March 1, 1787, in Bedford County.
   Elizabeth Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. Elizabeth married  William Scruggs on Feb. 8, 2784, in Bedford County (DB-7:499).
   Frances Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. She married a cousin, Thomas Buford, son of Mary Welch and William Buford.

   Thomas Buford, grandchild of Elizabeth Bramlett and James Buford, married Elizabeth "Betsy" Shropshire. Their child is Columbia S. Buford, the second wife of Dr. Christopher Columbus Graham.
   Columbia S. Buford, child of Elizabeth "Betsy" Shropshire and Thomas Buford, was born circa 1839 in Kentucky. (Columbia's great-grandmother, Elizabeth Bramlett Buford is the great-aunt of Thomas Elliott Bramlette, whose second wife is Mary E. Graham Adams, daughter of Dr. Christopher Columbus Graham and his first wife, Teresa Sutton.) Columbia and Dr. Graham married in 1861 when she was age 22. She was a resident of Crab Orchard, Ky. She died not long after the marriage, within a year; she and Dr. Graham did not have children who survived.
   Dr. Christopher Columbus Graham, father of Mary E. Graham Adams Bramlette, and second father-in-law of Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Oct. 10, 1784, at Fort Worthington near Danville, Kentucky Territory, the son of Mary Worthington and James Graham, one of the legendary “long hunters” who explored the Kentucky Frontier in 1769-1774. The Grahams went into the territory near the Falls of Ohio in 1778 with Gen. George Rogers Clark, who is buried near Thomas in Cave Hill Cemetery. The next year they were among the founders of Louisville. Dr. Graham attended the wedding of Nancy Hanks and Thomas Lincoln on June 12, 1806. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, serving with Major Holmes when wounded and captured, then exchanged. He received his medical degree from Transylvania in 1819. He attempted to recover some of his escaped slaves in Canada in 1840-1841. He built a four-story brick hotel for 1,000 guests at Harrodsburg Springs in 1842-1843. The property and building, which cost $300,000, was sold to the government for $100,000 in 1852. He also served in the Mexican War in 1846. He was an author of scientific and natural history books and articles; an adventurer and renaissance man: a physician, businessman, silversmith, archeologist and early resident of Harrodsburg and Louisville, finally settling in Danville, Boyle Co., Ky. He died there at age 100 years and four months on Feb. 3, 1885, and was buried in Bellevue Cemetery. His first wife, Teresa Sutton, was born May 8, 1804, the daughter of Sarah “Sallie” Fulkerson and David Sutton. After Teresa died, Dr. Graham second married Columbia S. Buford in 1861.
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Cousins and Co-authors of Our Kin: Lula Eastman Jeter Parker and Mary Denham Ackerly Field

 
A descendant of Elizabeth Bramlett Buford: the late Lula Eastman Jeter Parker (1873-1954), a native and resident of Bedford Co., Va., historian, genealogist and author who was active in documenting local, state, regional, national and family history. She is co-author, with Mary Denham Ackerly Field, of Our Kin: The Genealogies of Some of the Early Families Who Made History in the Founding and Development of Bedford County, Virginia (Lynchburg, Va.: J. P. Bell, 1930) and co-author with Peter Viemeister of Parker's History of Bedford County, Virginia (Bedford: Parker, Bedford: 1938; Bedford: Bedford Democrat, 1954).
   Lula also contributed to a compilation naming Bedford County World War II veterans and was involved in many civic projects in her lifetime. She was an active member of Peaks of Otter D.A.R., a graduate of Belmont Seminary and Hollins Institute. She married George Pleasant Parker, who both are buried Oakwood Cemetery, Bedford, Va., and they are parents of four children. Lula directly descends from parents, Laurie Cornelia Mays and Thomas Alexander Jeter, who also had another daughter, Laura E. M. Jeter Davidson. Thomas Alexander Jeter (1841-1885) is son of Virginia Ann White (1820-1877) and Fielding Harris Jeter (1810-1894), and Laurie Cornelia Mays Jeter (1851-1876) is daughter of Malinda Wright and Joseph W. Mays. Virginia Ann White Jeter is daughter of Matilda Buford (1793-1876) and Jacob Washington White (1792-1829). Matilda Buford, daughter of Martha Hill Logwood Hubbard and William Buford, is listed as under guardianship of Thomas Logwood (grandfather) when she married Jacob Washington White in 1812 in Bedford County. She second married William Thaxton. William Buford (1760s-1794) of Crab Orchard, Ky., is son of Elizabeth Bramblett and Capt. James Buford and grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr. (See their history above.) Jacob Washington White descends from Capt. Jacob White, son of Henry White, the former of Buckingham and Bedford counties and a Revolutionary War veteran who married Hannah Spiers and Nancy Oglesby. (No information about how or if Capt. Jacob White is related to Stephen White, husband of Agatha Bramblett, and his father, Thomas White of Essex/Caroline Co., Va.)
   A White cousin of Lula Eastman Jeter Parker is the late Mary Denham Ackerly Field (1885-1970), a native and resident of Bedford Co., Va., also historian, genealogist, author, who is co-author with Lula of Our KinMary Denham Ackerly Field, who married George Harris Field (1868-1937), is daughter of Mary Conna Blount White (1862-1968) and John Paul Glascow Ackerly Sr. (1850-1927). Mary Conna Blount White Ackerly is daughter of Mary Virginia White (1836-1916) and John Milton White (1831-1920). Mary Virginia White is daughter of Mary Ann Gwatkin (1810-1846) and Henry Milton White (1805-1867). Henry Milton White is son of Hannah Spiers (1700-1780) and Capt. Jacob White (1763-1832), Virginia Militia, Revolutionary War. John Milton White (1831-1920) is son of Caroline Poindexter (1809-1837) and Col. William Allen White (1804-1844) who also is son of Hannah Spiers and Capt. Jacob White.
   Capt. Jacob White, of Buckingham and Bedford counties. who married Hannah Spiers and Nancy Oglesby, reportedly is the son of Henry White. (As noted above, no information about how or if Henry White or Capt. Jacob White is related to Stephen White, husband of Agatha Bramblett, and his father, Thomas White of Essex/Caroline Co., Va.)
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One of Elizabeth Bramlett and James Buford's descendants or relatives may be John R. Buford, 72, born circa 1840, a Virginia military cadet, assigned to Hilliard’s Legion Artillery during the Civil War/War Between the States, who is pictured in a photo of “Confederate Ex-patriots in South America.” John is the second from right, back row. The image appears in Confederate Veteran, Vol. 21, p. 169. The photo was taken Aug. 20, 1912, at the home of Dr. Robert C. Norris, at Villa Americano, Estado de São Paulo, Brazil, South America. Between 10,000 and 20,000 ex-Confederates left America when the South lost the war in 1865, some taking their slaves, to live in Brazil where slavery was legal until 1888. The emperor at the time gave them incentives, including legal slavery, low land prices and low or no taxes, to emigrate. Most settled in and around São Paulo and Rio De Janeiro and present-day Santa Bárbara d'Oeste and Americana. Many who developed homesickness and/or disillusionment about the opportunities for economic success in Brazil eventually returned to the United States. Those who remained, designated as “Confederados,” at the end of their lives left descendants whose families today live and celebrate the Confederacy in many cities throughout Brazil.
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AFTERWORD
Famous watercolor of Gullah Slaves circa 1790 dancing and playing African-derived musical instruments, including shegureh scarf rattle, molo banjo precursor, and gudugudu gourd drum: "The Old Plantation," most likely Roseland Plantation, Beaufort, S.C., owned by John Rose, also the attributed painter, courtesy Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
   As Bramblette descendants and American citizens we should understand from history and experience that some family members and others, especially minorities and immigrants, have not shared and still do not share equally the opportunities and prosperity available to everyone pursuing the American Dream. We live in an unjust society that does not yet protect minorities by ensuring equal opportunity in the workplace and equal salaries on their paychecks, that does not universally protect voting, reproductive, LBGTQ and civil rights. American ethnic and cultural discrimination began in the colonies, was imported, and has been perpetuated ever since. Before the Civil War, many people supported or ignored the practice of slavery, which generally was considered to be socially acceptable. Some Bramblettes were large land and slave owners, including the ancestors of our relative Gov. Thomas Elliott Bramlette of Kentucky. He participated as a Union officer in 1861-1863 and, a proponent of President Abraham Lincoln, he had a front seat at the national spectacle, so to speak, as a political leader in 1863-1867. In public speeches during and after the war, Thomas definitively described THE CAUSE of the Civil War as “a sectional dispute about SLAVERY” (his words; my emphases). The South seceded because it wanted the states' right to and retain and expand slavery, and the North wanted to keep the Union intact while constraining and eventually eliminating slavery. After the war, which resulted in catastrophic death and destruction and did not completely solve the issue, some promoted Jim Crow laws and supported or joined Knights of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). Discovered references to such family activities and family slaves are included in this history, even those former slaves with biological connections to their owners, to embrace and include them -- to open wide the door in the brick wall, lay out the welcome mat -- and to facilitate the difficult task of African American researchers. One such astonishing family discovery involves the Civil Rights icon Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer who joined the struggle for voting rights in the South during the 1960s. The experiences of her grandmother Liza Gober Bramlett as a Mississippi slave influenced Fannie's courageous decision to work for equality against all odds and with dangerous, potentially fatal consequences. Beaten to near death merely for her desire to vote, she stood up over and over again after every subsequent attack and setback, risking everything for what she conceived to be the right. Her efforts with other freedom fighters continue to inspire contemporary proponents of national and universal civil and human rights. We live in a nation founded by European immigrants upon a revolutionary ideology: Freedom from tyranny. Our Continental Congress' Declaration of Independence tells us that we all -- “all men” -- including minorities, are born with “Inalienable Rights” which include “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.” Yet the United States Constitution contains one particular paradoxical conundrum with no clear or easy solution: it hypocritically promoted freedom while protecting slavery. The free labor and trade system of the uncompensated enslaved made many white Americans rich; it built our plantations, towns, cities; and it distinctly defined our country and society as a divided nation from its inception. And, inexplicably, the peculiar institution's racist effects still covertly and overtly negatively affect the social, economic, political and cultural aspects of America as we know it today. Only a few poignant examples of current events...
Shocking: Some high schools in the South today--in 2016--are still segregated according to skin color. Outrageous: It took a white supremacist's attempt to start a race war with the cold blooded massacre of nine Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church members in June 2015 at Charleston, S. C., before the state government would reluctantly remove a specific, racially symbolic, Confederate Battle Flag from the statehouse in Columbia. That disrespected Virginia flag, not used in battle by South Carolina troops, the same banner adopted and hailed by the Emanuel A. M. E. Church murderer, had been directly insulting state residents at the capital for the past 54 years despite ongoing objections by constituents. Typical: Our successful first African-American President has been openly and relentlessly despised, verbally abused, personally, politically and professionally attacked, obstructed and targeted for failure on a daily basis during his entire tenure merely because some in a specific opposing political party do not like the color of his skin. The American people twice selected President Barack Hussein Obama with a majority of millions of votes, and he has turned the country around despite constant opposition. Crazy: Living History--A front runner/presumed GOP nominee in the current presidential campaign--who regularly makes public xenophobic, homophobic, misogynistic, sexist, racist remarks--equally opportunistic bloviations--uses bullying, name calling, hate mongering and vulgarity to incite unrest and violence, to attract a cult-like strain of voter-followers who unwittingly or purposefully still suffer from the lingering negative effects of patriarchy, inherited and adopted ignorance and white supremacy. The historical alternative is our best hope to avoid chaos, to keep our country on the right track toward a more perfect, free union. 
Undeniable family, regional and national embarrassments, white supremacy, white nationalism and slavery are inextricably associated with prejudice, racism, discrimination and oppression. Unfortunately they are part of our history that can not and should not be denied or ignored and need to be neutralized, eliminated by current and future generations. Rallying at political events and promoting candidates on social media are not enough: Such activities help identify problematical issues, but actual change takes place in the voter booth and by society in the community by activists who reject institutional indifference and collective resistance to progress.
#CharlestonStrong #AmericaStrong
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“NOBODY'S FREE UNTIL EVERYBODY'S FREE.” -- Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer, Granddaughter of Liza Gober Bramlett, Former Slave owned by Gobers and Bramletts in Mississippi.
  
Fannie Lou Hamer: Intelligent, Courageous & Proud, Generous
   Although iconic civil rights activist Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer may not be biologically related to the Bramlett family, her mother shared the surname and her grandmother Liza Gober Bramlett, who may  or may not have been related, reportedly gave birth to many children fathered by her slave owners. Fannie did not discuss details of her family relations in public, so not much is known about her mother and grandmother. She was born Oct. 6, 1917, in Montgomery Co., Miss., the 20th child of Lou Ella Bramlett and James Lee “Jim” Townsend. Lou Ella Bramlett is the 23rd child of Liza Gober Bramlett, a former slave owned by Gobers and Bramletts in Mississippi. Fannie grew up ill, disabled and perpetually hungry and exhausted from the mind- and soul- and body-numbing toil of child labor, the never-ending chores of a black sharecropper’s daughter in the unforgiving cotton fields of the Mississippi Delta. She grew up hearing stories about the indignities suffered by her slave ancestors. The experiences of her grandmother Liza, who through coerced integration was forced to bear children of her owners, and Fannie's own forced sterilization, influenced her decision to join the struggle for voting rights in the South during the 1960s and work for equality and freedom. She carried on even after being illegally detained and beaten to near death in a Mississippi jail. She joined the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and became well known in the Civil Rights Movement as a venerated speaker, singer and activist for change. Fannie married Perry “Pap” Hamer. They did not have biological children but adopted Dorothy Jean, Virgie Ree, Lenora and Jacqueline. She died March 14, 1977. She rests at Freedom Farms Cooperative.

For more about Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer’s remarkable life: see Chana Kai Lee’s biography For Freedom’s Sake: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1999) and Chris Myers Asch’s biography The Senator and the Sharecropper: The Freedom Struggles of James O. Eastland and Fannie Lou Hamer (New York: The New Press, 2008). Both document the lack of social justice and the struggle for freedom and civil rights in the toxic racist atmosphere of 19th-century Mississippi. Fannie also discusses civil rights and growing up in the Delta during a 1972 recorded interview with transcript available only on location, Volume 31, at the Center for Oral History and Cultural Heritage, McCain Library, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Miss. Fannie's autobiography, To Praise My Bridges, was published in Jackson, Miss., in 1967. Fannie Lou Hamer Cancer Foundation, Ruleville, Miss., works in her honor and memory for better treatments and  a cure.
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African-American Civil War Soldiers Honored at the Memorial in Washington, D. C.
Fought for Freedom: combatted, sailed, scouted, guarded, picketed, constructed, cooked...
  
Former Bramblette slaves enlisted in the Union Army in 1863-1865 to fight for freedom.
Angel Oak Tree, John's Island, Charleston, S.C.: awe-inspiring existing specimen of America's ancient natural history
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